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Charles Lowell

10 Podcast Episodes

Latest 24 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

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Alternatives to Relay, the GraphQL Stack, and Adulthood with Charles Lowell and Taras Mankovski

Whiskey Web and Whatnot

Just because something is widely used doesn’t always mean it’s your best solution. Frontside Founder Charles Lowell and CEO Taras Mankovski, stumbled into an alt GraphQL stack simply because the nature of a product didn’t mesh with Apollo. After happening upon two up-and-coming technologies, GraphQL modules and Envelope, a solution was born, as was a newfound flexibility with GraphQL stacks.In this episode, Charles and Taras talk with Chuck and Robbie about their accidental developer discovery, the drawbacks of UI libraries, what a Relay alternative looks like, what in the world Pact is, and why adulthood is vastly overrated. Key Takeaways [00:48] - An introduction to the Frontside guys. [02:29] - A whiskey review. [08:46] - How Charles and Taras discovered a less-than-ordinary GraphQL stack. [18:39] - Why JSON:API doesn’t always make sense. [23:11] - Taras’ criteria for a valuable alternative to Relay.  [25:04] - What is Pact?  [28:30] - An NFT chat, and why adulthood is vastly overrated.  [41:45] - Charles’ and Taras’ hobbies outside of the web and the best way to bond with your baby.  [54:38] - A few last-minute mentions.  Quotes[21:04] - “Relay is complex, it’s difficult, and it’s not as magical as other things that I’ve used. So I actually don’t think that the primary benefit is to the clients that consume it, ironically. I think the benefit is to the developers that are trying to understand.” ~ Charles Lowell[56:20] - “The combination of testing and simulation and the developer experience stuff, and the emergence of developer experience as an area of focus is exciting and interesting in the same way that web and Ember was when it started. Just that sense of, we’re discovering something new and there are people who are actively trying to solve a problem.” ~ Taras Mankovski Links Charles on Twitter Taras on Twitter Frontside The Balvenie Doublewood 12 The Singleton of Glendullan Liberty GraphQL Apollo Discord Envelope JSON:API runspired Whiskey Web and Whatnot: Discovering Ember, Adopting Orbit, and Unlocking Optimization with Chris Thoburn (runspired) Ember Data Orbit Relay Pact Swach Blockchain Web3 No JS Rails The Guild Hive GraphQL CodeGen The Sandbox Snoop Dog Second Life Linden Lab Duolingo Casamigos Deno GoJS Backstage Connect with our hosts Robbie Wagner Chuck Carpenter Ship Shape Subscribe and stay in touch Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Whiskey Web and Whatnot Top-Tier, Full-Stack Software ConsultantsThis show is brought to you by Ship Shape. Ship Shape’s software consultants solve complex software and app development problems with top-tier coding expertise, superior service, and speed. In a sea of choices, our senior-level development crew rises above the rest by delivering the best solutions for fintech, cybersecurity, and other fast-growing industries. Check us out at shipshape.io.

1hr

17 Mar 2022

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Episode 218: Kubernetes for developers, with Charles Lowell

Software Defined Talk

"I don't care about networking...and load balancing." There's a lot of new concepts and stuff to learn when it comes to developing applications that will run on kubernetes. In this episode, Coté talks with Charles Lowell about his experience. Also, we imagine measuring the humidity of mayonnaise. If you need some excellent app coding, check out Charle's company, Frontside! They also have a podcast where they discuss recent programming frameworks and idea, and relating coding cool stuff. You may recall that Charles was the co-host of Coté's first podcast empire, DrunkAndRetired.com.Special Guest: Charles Lowell.

52mins

14 Feb 2020

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MJS 097: Charles Lowell

My JavaScript Story

Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max WoodSpecial Guest:  Charles LowellEpisode SummaryIn this episode of My Ruby Story, Charles hosts Charles Lowell, founder and  developer at The Frontside Software based in Austin, TX.Listen to Charles on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode.Links JavaScript Jabber 337: Microstates.js – Composable State Primitives for JavaScript with Charles Lowell & Taras Mankovski Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv PicksCharles Lowell: Yousician App Charles Max Wood: Parade of Homes - St. George, Utah Vrbo.com

56mins

6 Mar 2019

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MJS 097: Charles Lowell

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest:  Charles Lowell Episode Summary In this episode of My Ruby Story, Charles hosts Charles Lowell, founder and  developer at The Frontside Software based in Austin, TX. Listen to Charles on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. Links JavaScript Jabber 337: Microstates.js – Composable State Primitives for JavaScript with Charles Lowell & Taras Mankovski Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Charles Lowell: Yousician App Charles Max Wood: Parade of Homes - St. George, Utah Vrbo.com

56mins

6 Mar 2019

Most Popular

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MJS 097: Charles Lowell

All JavaScript Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest:  Charles Lowell Episode Summary In this episode of My Ruby Story, Charles hosts Charles Lowell, founder and  developer at The Frontside Software based in Austin, TX. Listen to Charles on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. Links JavaScript Jabber 337: Microstates.js – Composable State Primitives for JavaScript with Charles Lowell & Taras Mankovski Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Charles Lowell: Yousician App Charles Max Wood: Parade of Homes - St. George, Utah Vrbo.com

56mins

6 Mar 2019

Episode artwork

JSJ 337: Microstates.js – Composable State Primitives for JavaScript with Charles Lowell & Taras Mankovski

All JavaScript Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Panel: Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Joe Eames AJ O’Neil Chris Ferdinandi  Special Guests: Charles Lowell (New Mexico) & Taras Mankovski (Toronto) In this episode, the panel talks with two special guests Charles and Taras. Charles Lowell is a principle engineer at Frontside, and he loves to code. Taras works with Charles and joined Frontside, because of Charles’ love for coding. There are great personalities at Frontside, which are quite diverse. Check out this episode to hear about microstates, microstates with react, Redux, and much more! Show Topics: 1:20 – Chuck: Let’s talk about microstates – what is that? 1:32 – Guest: My mind is focused on the how and not the what. I will zoom my mind out and let’s talk about the purposes of microstates. It means a few things. 1.) It’s going to work no matter what framework you are using. 2.) You shouldn’t have to be constantly reinventing the wheel. React Roundup – I talked about it there at this conference.  Finally, it really needs to feel JavaScript. We didn’t want you to feel like you weren’t using JavaScript. It uses computer properties off of those models. It doesn’t feel like there is anything special that you are doing. There are just a few simple rules. You can’t mutate the state in place. If you work with JavaScript you can use it very easily. Is that a high-level view? 7:13 – Panel: There are a lot of pieces. If I spoke on a few specific things I would say that it enables programming with state machines. 7:42 – Panel: We wanted it to fell like JavaScript – that’s what I heard. 7:49 – Aimee: I heard that, too. 7:59 – Guest. 8:15 – Aimee: Redux feels like JavaScript to me. 8:25 – Guest: It’s actually – a tool – that it feels natural so it’s not contrived. It’s all JavaScript. 8:49 – Panel. 9:28 – Guest: Idiomatic Ember for example. Idiomatic in the sense that it gives you object for you to work with, which are simple objects. 10:12 – Guest: You have your reducers and your...we could do those things but ultimately it’s powerful – and not action names – we use method names; the name of the method. 11:20 – Panel: I was digging through docs, and it feels like NORMAL JavaScript. It doesn’t seem like it’s tied to a certain framework or library platform? 11:45 – Guest: Yes, we felt a lot of time designing the interfaces the API and the implementation. We wanted it to feel natural but a tool that people reach for. (Guest continues to talk about WHY they created microstates.) Guest: We wanted to scale very well what you need when your needs to change. 13:39 – Chuck: I have a lot of friends who get into React and then they put in Redux then they realize they have to do a lot of work – and that makes sense to do less is more. 14:17 – Guest: To define these microstates and build them up incrementally...building smaller microstates out of larger ones. Guest continued: Will we be able to people can distribute React components a sweet array of components ready for me to use – would I be able to do the same for a small piece of state? We call them state machines, but ultimately we have some state that is driving it. Would we be able to distribute and share? 16:15 – Panel: I understand that this is tiny – but why wouldn’t I just use the native features in specific the immutability component to it? 16:42 – Guest: I’m glad you asked that question. We wanted to answer the question... Guest: With microstates you can have strict control and it gives you the benefit of doing sophisticated things very easily. 18:33 – Guest: You mentioned immutability that’s good that you did. It’s important to capture – and capturing the naturalness of JavaScript. It’s easy to build complex structures – and there is an appeal to that. We are building these graphs and these building up these trees. You brought up immutability – why through it away b/c it’s the essence of being a developer. If you have 3-4-5 levels of nesting you have to de-structure – get to the piece of data – change it – and in your state transition 80% of your code is navigating to the change and only 20% to actually make the change. You don’t have to make that tradeoff. 21:25 – Aimee: The one thing I like about the immutability b/c of the way you test it. 21:45 – Guest: There a few things you can test.  23:01 – Aimee: You did a good job of explaining it. 23:15 – Guest: It makes the things usually hard  easy! With immutability you can loose control, and if that happens you can get so confused. You don’t have a way to have a way to navigate to clarity. That’s what this does is make it less confusing. It gives you order and structure. It gives you a very clear path to do things you need to do. If there is a property on your object, and if there is a way to change it... 25:29 – Guest: The only constant is change no matter what framework you are working on. 24:46 – Chuck: We are talking about the benefits and philosophy. What if I have an app – and I realize I need state management – how do I put microstates into my app? It’s using Angular or React – how do I get my data into microstates? 26:35 – Guest: I can tell you what the integration looks like for any framework. You take a type and you passed that type and some value to the create function so what you get is a microstate. (The Guest continues diving into his answer.) 28:18 – Guest: That story is very similar to Redux, basically an event emitter. The state changes on the store. Maybe this is a good time to talk about the stability benefits and the lazy benefits because microstates is both of those things. Stability – if I invoke a transition and the result is unchanged – same microstate – it doesn’t emit an event. It recognizes it internally. It will recognize that it’s the same item. Using that in Ember or Redux you’d have to be doing thousands of actions and doing all that computation, but stability at that level. Also, stability in the sense of a tree. If I change one object then that changes it won’t change an element that it doesn’t need to change. 31:33 – Advertisement: Sentry.io 32:29 – Guest: I want to go back to your question, Chuck. Did we answer it? 32:40 – Chuck: Kind of. 32:50 – Guest. 32:59 – Guest: In Angular for example you can essentially turn a microstate... 33:51 – Guest: You could implement a connect, too. Because the primitive is small – there is no limit. 34:18 – Chuck summarizes their answers into his own words. 34:42 – Guest: If you were using a vanilla React component – this dot – I will bind this. You bind all of these features and then you pass them into your template. You can take it as a property...those are those handlers. They will perform the transition, update and what needs to be updated will happen. 35:55 – Chuck: Data and transitions are 2 separate things but you melded them together to feel like 1 thing. This way it keeps clean and fast. 36:16 – Guest: Every framework helps you in each way. Microstates let’s you do a few things: the quality of your data all in one place and you can share. 38:12 – Guest: He made and integrated Microstates with Redux tools. 38:28 – Guest talks about paths, microstates to trees. 39:22 – Chuck. 39:25 – Panel: When I think about state machines I have been half listening / half going through the docs. When I think of state machines I think about discreet operations like a literal machine. Like a robot of many steps it can step through. We have been talking about frontend frameworks like React - is this applicable to the more traditional systems like mechanical control or is it geared towards Vue layered applications? 40:23 – Guest: Absolutely. We have BIG TEST and it has a Vue component. 41:15 – Guest: when you create a microstate from a type you are creating an object that you can work with. 42:11 – Guest: Joe, I know you have experience with Angular I would love to get your insight. 42:33 – Joe: I feel like I have less experience with RX.js. A lot of what we are talking about and I am a traditionalist, and I would like you to introduce you guys to this topic. From my perspective, where would someone start if they haven’t been doing Flux pattern and I hear this podcast. I think this is a great solution – where do I get started? The official documents? Or is it the right solution to that person? 43:50 – Guest: Draw out the state machine that you want to represent in your Vue. These are the states that this can be in and this is the data that is required to get from one thing to the other. It’s a rope process. The arrow corresponds to the method, and... 44:49 – Panel: It reminds me back in the day of rational rows. 44:56 – Guest: My first job we were using rational rows. 45:22 – Panelist: Think through the state transitions – interesting that you are saying that. What about that I am in the middle – do you stop and think through it or no? 46:06 – Guest: I think it’s a Trojan horse in some ways. I think what’s interesting you start to realize how you implement your state transitions. 48:00 – (Guest continues.) 48:45 – Panel: That’s interesting. Do you have that in the docs to that process of stopping and thinking through your state transitions and putting into the microstate? 49:05 – Guest: I talked about this back in 2016. I outlined that process. When this project was in the Ember community. 49:16 – Guest: The next step for us is to make this information accessible. We’ve been shedding a few topics and saying this is how to use microstates in your project. We need to write up those guides to help them benefit in their applications. 50:00 – Chuck: What’s the future look like? 50:03 – Guest: We are working on performance profiling. Essentially you can hook up microstates to a fire hose. The next thing is settling on a pattern for modeling side effects inside microstates. Microstates are STATE and it’s immutable. 52:12 – Guest: Getting documentation. We have good README but we need traditional docs, too. 52:20 – Chuck: Anything else? 52:28 – Guest: If you need help email us and gives us a shot-out. 53:03 – Chuck: Let’s do some picks! 53:05 – Advertisement for Charles Max Wood’s course! Links: Kendo UI Frontside Redux Microstates Microstates with React Taras Mankovski’s Twitter Taras Mankovski’s GitHub Taras Mankovski’s LinkedIn Taras Mankovski’s Frontside Bio Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio Schedule Once Ruby on Rails Angular Get A Coder Job YouTube Talks Email: cowboyd@frontside.io Working with State Machines Twitch TV BigTest Close Brace REEF The Developer Experience YouTube Video Sponsors: Kendo UI Sentry.io – 2 months free – DEVCHAT/code Get A Coder Job Picks: Aimee ShopTalk Episode 327 Professional JavaScript for Web Developers Technical Debt Stripe Taras Twitch Channel Big Test Frontside Charles Lowell Chalkboards Sargent Art Chalk Chris Close Brace LaCroix Water Chris’s Git Hub Joe The Developer Experience Bait and Switch Good Bye Redux Recording Dungeon and Dragons AJ UtahJS Conf Start with Why The Rust Book VanillaJS w/ Chris Zero to One Charles Podwrench.com -  beta getacoderjob.com

1hr 18mins

30 Oct 2018

Episode artwork

JSJ 337: Microstates.js – Composable State Primitives for JavaScript with Charles Lowell & Taras Mankovski

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

Panel: Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Joe Eames AJ O’Neil Chris Ferdinandi  Special Guests: Charles Lowell (New Mexico) & Taras Mankovski (Toronto) In this episode, the panel talks with two special guests Charles and Taras. Charles Lowell is a principle engineer at Frontside, and he loves to code. Taras works with Charles and joined Frontside, because of Charles’ love for coding. There are great personalities at Frontside, which are quite diverse. Check out this episode to hear about microstates, microstates with react, Redux, and much more! Show Topics: 1:20 – Chuck: Let’s talk about microstates – what is that? 1:32 – Guest: My mind is focused on the how and not the what. I will zoom my mind out and let’s talk about the purposes of microstates. It means a few things. 1.) It’s going to work no matter what framework you are using. 2.) You shouldn’t have to be constantly reinventing the wheel. React Roundup – I talked about it there at this conference.  Finally, it really needs to feel JavaScript. We didn’t want you to feel like you weren’t using JavaScript. It uses computer properties off of those models. It doesn’t feel like there is anything special that you are doing. There are just a few simple rules. You can’t mutate the state in place. If you work with JavaScript you can use it very easily. Is that a high-level view? 7:13 – Panel: There are a lot of pieces. If I spoke on a few specific things I would say that it enables programming with state machines. 7:42 – Panel: We wanted it to fell like JavaScript – that’s what I heard. 7:49 – Aimee: I heard that, too. 7:59 – Guest. 8:15 – Aimee: Redux feels like JavaScript to me. 8:25 – Guest: It’s actually – a tool – that it feels natural so it’s not contrived. It’s all JavaScript. 8:49 – Panel. 9:28 – Guest: Idiomatic Ember for example. Idiomatic in the sense that it gives you object for you to work with, which are simple objects. 10:12 – Guest: You have your reducers and your...we could do those things but ultimately it’s powerful – and not action names – we use method names; the name of the method. 11:20 – Panel: I was digging through docs, and it feels like NORMAL JavaScript. It doesn’t seem like it’s tied to a certain framework or library platform? 11:45 – Guest: Yes, we felt a lot of time designing the interfaces the API and the implementation. We wanted it to feel natural but a tool that people reach for. (Guest continues to talk about WHY they created microstates.) Guest: We wanted to scale very well what you need when your needs to change. 13:39 – Chuck: I have a lot of friends who get into React and then they put in Redux then they realize they have to do a lot of work – and that makes sense to do less is more. 14:17 – Guest: To define these microstates and build them up incrementally...building smaller microstates out of larger ones. Guest continued: Will we be able to people can distribute React components a sweet array of components ready for me to use – would I be able to do the same for a small piece of state? We call them state machines, but ultimately we have some state that is driving it. Would we be able to distribute and share? 16:15 – Panel: I understand that this is tiny – but why wouldn’t I just use the native features in specific the immutability component to it? 16:42 – Guest: I’m glad you asked that question. We wanted to answer the question... Guest: With microstates you can have strict control and it gives you the benefit of doing sophisticated things very easily. 18:33 – Guest: You mentioned immutability that’s good that you did. It’s important to capture – and capturing the naturalness of JavaScript. It’s easy to build complex structures – and there is an appeal to that. We are building these graphs and these building up these trees. You brought up immutability – why through it away b/c it’s the essence of being a developer. If you have 3-4-5 levels of nesting you have to de-structure – get to the piece of data – change it – and in your state transition 80% of your code is navigating to the change and only 20% to actually make the change. You don’t have to make that tradeoff. 21:25 – Aimee: The one thing I like about the immutability b/c of the way you test it. 21:45 – Guest: There a few things you can test.  23:01 – Aimee: You did a good job of explaining it. 23:15 – Guest: It makes the things usually hard  easy! With immutability you can loose control, and if that happens you can get so confused. You don’t have a way to have a way to navigate to clarity. That’s what this does is make it less confusing. It gives you order and structure. It gives you a very clear path to do things you need to do. If there is a property on your object, and if there is a way to change it... 25:29 – Guest: The only constant is change no matter what framework you are working on. 24:46 – Chuck: We are talking about the benefits and philosophy. What if I have an app – and I realize I need state management – how do I put microstates into my app? It’s using Angular or React – how do I get my data into microstates? 26:35 – Guest: I can tell you what the integration looks like for any framework. You take a type and you passed that type and some value to the create function so what you get is a microstate. (The Guest continues diving into his answer.) 28:18 – Guest: That story is very similar to Redux, basically an event emitter. The state changes on the store. Maybe this is a good time to talk about the stability benefits and the lazy benefits because microstates is both of those things. Stability – if I invoke a transition and the result is unchanged – same microstate – it doesn’t emit an event. It recognizes it internally. It will recognize that it’s the same item. Using that in Ember or Redux you’d have to be doing thousands of actions and doing all that computation, but stability at that level. Also, stability in the sense of a tree. If I change one object then that changes it won’t change an element that it doesn’t need to change. 31:33 – Advertisement: Sentry.io 32:29 – Guest: I want to go back to your question, Chuck. Did we answer it? 32:40 – Chuck: Kind of. 32:50 – Guest. 32:59 – Guest: In Angular for example you can essentially turn a microstate... 33:51 – Guest: You could implement a connect, too. Because the primitive is small – there is no limit. 34:18 – Chuck summarizes their answers into his own words. 34:42 – Guest: If you were using a vanilla React component – this dot – I will bind this. You bind all of these features and then you pass them into your template. You can take it as a property...those are those handlers. They will perform the transition, update and what needs to be updated will happen. 35:55 – Chuck: Data and transitions are 2 separate things but you melded them together to feel like 1 thing. This way it keeps clean and fast. 36:16 – Guest: Every framework helps you in each way. Microstates let’s you do a few things: the quality of your data all in one place and you can share. 38:12 – Guest: He made and integrated Microstates with Redux tools. 38:28 – Guest talks about paths, microstates to trees. 39:22 – Chuck. 39:25 – Panel: When I think about state machines I have been half listening / half going through the docs. When I think of state machines I think about discreet operations like a literal machine. Like a robot of many steps it can step through. We have been talking about frontend frameworks like React - is this applicable to the more traditional systems like mechanical control or is it geared towards Vue layered applications? 40:23 – Guest: Absolutely. We have BIG TEST and it has a Vue component. 41:15 – Guest: when you create a microstate from a type you are creating an object that you can work with. 42:11 – Guest: Joe, I know you have experience with Angular I would love to get your insight. 42:33 – Joe: I feel like I have less experience with RX.js. A lot of what we are talking about and I am a traditionalist, and I would like you to introduce you guys to this topic. From my perspective, where would someone start if they haven’t been doing Flux pattern and I hear this podcast. I think this is a great solution – where do I get started? The official documents? Or is it the right solution to that person? 43:50 – Guest: Draw out the state machine that you want to represent in your Vue. These are the states that this can be in and this is the data that is required to get from one thing to the other. It’s a rope process. The arrow corresponds to the method, and... 44:49 – Panel: It reminds me back in the day of rational rows. 44:56 – Guest: My first job we were using rational rows. 45:22 – Panelist: Think through the state transitions – interesting that you are saying that. What about that I am in the middle – do you stop and think through it or no? 46:06 – Guest: I think it’s a Trojan horse in some ways. I think what’s interesting you start to realize how you implement your state transitions. 48:00 – (Guest continues.) 48:45 – Panel: That’s interesting. Do you have that in the docs to that process of stopping and thinking through your state transitions and putting into the microstate? 49:05 – Guest: I talked about this back in 2016. I outlined that process. When this project was in the Ember community. 49:16 – Guest: The next step for us is to make this information accessible. We’ve been shedding a few topics and saying this is how to use microstates in your project. We need to write up those guides to help them benefit in their applications. 50:00 – Chuck: What’s the future look like? 50:03 – Guest: We are working on performance profiling. Essentially you can hook up microstates to a fire hose. The next thing is settling on a pattern for modeling side effects inside microstates. Microstates are STATE and it’s immutable. 52:12 – Guest: Getting documentation. We have good README but we need traditional docs, too. 52:20 – Chuck: Anything else? 52:28 – Guest: If you need help email us and gives us a shot-out. 53:03 – Chuck: Let’s do some picks! 53:05 – Advertisement for Charles Max Wood’s course! Links: Kendo UI Frontside Redux Microstates Microstates with React Taras Mankovski’s Twitter Taras Mankovski’s GitHub Taras Mankovski’s LinkedIn Taras Mankovski’s Frontside Bio Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio Schedule Once Ruby on Rails Angular Get A Coder Job YouTube Talks Email: cowboyd@frontside.io Working with State Machines Twitch TV BigTest Close Brace REEF The Developer Experience YouTube Video Sponsors: Kendo UI Sentry.io – 2 months free – DEVCHAT/code Get A Coder Job Picks: Aimee ShopTalk Episode 327 Professional JavaScript for Web Developers Technical Debt Stripe Taras Twitch Channel Big Test Frontside Charles Lowell Chalkboards Sargent Art Chalk Chris Close Brace LaCroix Water Chris’s Git Hub Joe The Developer Experience Bait and Switch Good Bye Redux Recording Dungeon and Dragons AJ UtahJS Conf Start with Why The Rust Book VanillaJS w/ Chris Zero to One Charles Podwrench.com -  beta getacoderjob.com

1hr 18mins

30 Oct 2018

Episode artwork

JSJ 337: Microstates.js – Composable State Primitives for JavaScript with Charles Lowell & Taras Mankovski

JavaScript Jabber

Panel:  Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Joe Eames AJ O’Neil Chris Ferdinandi  Special Guests: Charles Lowell (New Mexico) & Taras Mankovski (Toronto)In this episode, the panel talks with two special guests Charles and Taras. Charles Lowell is a principle engineer at Frontside, and he loves to code. Taras works with Charles and joined Frontside, because of Charles’ love for coding. There are great personalities at Frontside, which are quite diverse. Check out this episode to hear about microstates, microstates with react, Redux, and much more!Show Topics:1:20 – Chuck: Let’s talk about microstates – what is that?1:32 – Guest: My mind is focused on the how and not the what. I will zoom my mind out and let’s talk about the purposes of microstates. It means a few things. 1.) It’s going to work no matter what framework you are using. 2.) You shouldn’t have to be constantly reinventing the wheel. React Roundup – I talked about it there at this conference. Finally, it really needs to feel JavaScript. We didn’t want you to feel like you weren’t using JavaScript. It uses computer properties off of those models. It doesn’t feel like there is anything special that you are doing. There are just a few simple rules. You can’t mutate the state in place. If you work with JavaScript you can use it very easily. Is that a high-level view?7:13 – Panel: There are a lot of pieces. If I spoke on a few specific things I would say that it enables programming with state machines.7:42 – Panel: We wanted it to fell like JavaScript – that’s what I heard.7:49 – Aimee: I heard that, too.7:59 – Guest.8:15 – Aimee: Redux feels like JavaScript to me.8:25 – Guest: It’s actually – a tool – that it feels natural so it’s not contrived. It’s all JavaScript.8:49 – Panel.9:28 – Guest: Idiomatic Ember for example. Idiomatic in the sense that it gives you object for you to work with, which are simple objects.10:12 – Guest: You have your reducers and your...we could do those things but ultimately it’s powerful – and not action names – we use method names; the name of the method.11:20 – Panel: I was digging through docs, and it feels like NORMAL JavaScript. It doesn’t seem like it’s tied to a certain framework or library platform?11:45 – Guest: Yes, we felt a lot of time designing the interfaces the API and the implementation. We wanted it to feel natural but a tool that people reach for.(Guest continues to talk about WHY they created microstates.)Guest: We wanted to scale very well what you need when your needs to change.13:39 – Chuck: I have a lot of friends who get into React and then they put in Redux then they realize they have to do a lot of work – and that makes sense to do less is more.14:17 – Guest: To define these microstates and build them up incrementally...building smaller microstates out of larger ones.Guest continued: Will we be able to people can distribute React components a sweet array of components ready for me to use – would I be able to do the same for a small piece of state? We call them state machines, but ultimately we have some state that is driving it. Would we be able to distribute and share?16:15 – Panel: I understand that this is tiny – but why wouldn’t I just use the native features in specific the immutability component to it?16:42 – Guest: I’m glad you asked that question. We wanted to answer the question...Guest: With microstates you can have strict control and it gives you the benefit of doing sophisticated things very easily.18:33 – Guest: You mentioned immutability that’s good that you did. It’s important to capture – and capturing the naturalness of JavaScript. It’s easy to build complex structures – and there is an appeal to that. We are building these graphs and these building up these trees. You brought up immutability – why through it away b/c it’s the essence of being a developer. If you have 3-4-5 levels of nesting you have to de-structure – get to the piece of data – change it – and in your state transition 80% of your code is navigating to the change and only 20% to actually make the change. You don’t have to make that tradeoff.21:25 – Aimee: The one thing I like about the immutability b/c of the way you test it.21:45 – Guest: There a few things you can test. 23:01 – Aimee: You did a good job of explaining it.23:15 – Guest: It makes the things usually hard  easy! With immutability you can loose control, and if that happens you can get so confused. You don’t have a way to have a way to navigate to clarity. That’s what this does is make it less confusing. It gives you order and structure. It gives you a very clear path to do things you need to do. If there is a property on your object, and if there is a way to change it...25:29 – Guest: The only constant is change no matter what framework you are working on.24:46 – Chuck: We are talking about the benefits and philosophy. What if I have an app – and I realize I need state management – how do I put microstates into my app? It’s using Angular or React – how do I get my data into microstates?26:35 – Guest: I can tell you what the integration looks like for any framework. You take a type and you passed that type and some value to the create function so what you get is a microstate.(The Guest continues diving into his answer.)28:18 – Guest: That story is very similar to Redux, basically an event emitter. The state changes on the store.Maybe this is a good time to talk about the stability benefits and the lazy benefits because microstates is both of those things.Stability – if I invoke a transition and the result is unchanged – same microstate – it doesn’t emit an event. It recognizes it internally. It will recognize that it’s the same item. Using that in Ember or Redux you’d have to be doing thousands of actions and doing all that computation, but stability at that level.Also, stability in the sense of a tree. If I change one object then that changes it won’t change an element that it doesn’t need to change.31:33 – Advertisement: Sentry.io32:29 – Guest: I want to go back to your question, Chuck. Did we answer it?32:40 – Chuck: Kind of.32:50 – Guest.32:59 – Guest: In Angular for example you can essentially turn a microstate...33:51 – Guest: You could implement a connect, too. Because the primitive is small – there is no limit.34:18 – Chuck summarizes their answers into his own words.34:42 – Guest: If you were using a vanilla React component – this dot – I will bind this. You bind all of these features and then you pass them into your template. You can take it as a property...those are those handlers. They will perform the transition, update and what needs to be updated will happen.35:55 – Chuck: Data and transitions are 2 separate things but you melded them together to feel like 1 thing. This way it keeps clean and fast.36:16 – Guest: Every framework helps you in each way.Microstates let’s you do a few things: the quality of your data all in one place and you can share.38:12 – Guest: He made and integrated Microstates with Redux tools.38:28 – Guest talks about paths, microstates to trees.39:22 – Chuck.39:25 – Panel: When I think about state machines I have been half listening / half going through the docs. When I think of state machines I think about discreet operations like a literal machine. Like a robot of many steps it can step through. We have been talking about frontend frameworks like React - is this applicable to the more traditional systems like mechanical control or is it geared towards Vue layered applications?40:23 – Guest: Absolutely. We have BIG TEST and it has a Vue component.41:15 – Guest: when you create a microstate from a type you are creating an object that you can work with.42:11 – Guest: Joe, I know you have experience with Angular I would love to get your insight.42:33 – Joe: I feel like I have less experience with RX.js. A lot of what we are talking about and I am a traditionalist, and I would like you to introduce you guys to this topic. From my perspective, where would someone start if they haven’t been doing Flux pattern and I hear this podcast. I think this is a great solution – where do I get started? The official documents? Or is it the right solution to that person?43:50 – Guest: Draw out the state machine that you want to represent in your Vue. These are the states that this can be in and this is the data that is required to get from one thing to the other. It’s a rope process. The arrow corresponds to the method, and...44:49 – Panel: It reminds me back in the day of rational rows.44:56 – Guest: My first job we were using rational rows.45:22 – Panelist: Think through the state transitions – interesting that you are saying that. What about that I am in the middle – do you stop and think through it or no?46:06 – Guest: I think it’s a Trojan horse in some ways. I think what’s interesting you start to realize how you implement your state transitions.48:00 – (Guest continues.)48:45 – Panel: That’s interesting. Do you have that in the docs to that process of stopping and thinking through your state transitions and putting into the microstate?49:05 – Guest: I talked about this back in 2016. I outlined that process. When this project was in the Ember community.49:16 – Guest: The next step for us is to make this information accessible. We’ve been shedding a few topics and saying this is how to use microstates in your project. We need to write up those guides to help them benefit in their applications.50:00 – Chuck: What’s the future look like?50:03 – Guest: We are working on performance profiling.Essentially you can hook up microstates to a fire hose.The next thing is settling on a pattern for modeling side effects inside microstates. Microstates are STATE and it’s immutable.52:12 – Guest: Getting documentation. We have good README but we need traditional docs, too.52:20 – Chuck: Anything else?52:28 – Guest: If you need help email us and gives us a shot-out.53:03 – Chuck: Let’s do some picks!53:05 – Advertisement for Charles Max Wood’s course! Links: Kendo UI Frontside Redux Microstates Microstates with React Taras Mankovski’s Twitter Taras Mankovski’s GitHub Taras Mankovski’s LinkedIn Taras Mankovski’s Frontside Bio Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio Schedule Once Ruby on Rails Angular Get A Coder Job YouTube Talks Email: cowboyd@frontside.io Working with State Machines Twitch TV BigTest Close Brace REEF The Developer Experience YouTube Video Sponsors: Kendo UI Sentry.io – 2 months free – DEVCHAT/code Get A Coder Job Picks:Aimee ShopTalk Episode 327 Professional JavaScript for Web Developers  Technical Debt Stripe Taras Twitch Channel Big Test Frontside Charles Lowell Chalkboards Sargent Art Chalk Chris Close Brace LaCroix Water Chris’s Git HubJoe The Developer Experience Bait and Switch Good Bye Redux  Recording Dungeon and DragonsAJ UtahJS Conf Start with Why The Rust Book VanillaJS w/ Chris Zero to OneCharles Podwrench.com -  beta getacoderjob.com

1hr 18mins

30 Oct 2018

Episode artwork

RRU 028: “Microstates.js – Composable State Primitive” with Taras Mankovski & Charles Lowell

React Round Up

Panel: Charles (Chuck) Max Wood Lucas Reis Special Guests: Charles Lowell & Taras MankovskiIn this episode, the panel talks with two special guests Charles and Taras. Charles Lowell is a principle engineer at Frontside, and he loves to code. Taras works with Charles and joined Frontside, because of Charles’ love for coding. There are great personalities at Frontside, which are quite diverse. Check out this episode to hear about microstates, microstates with react, OM, Redux, and much more!Show Topics:2:32 – Chuck: Why do we need it (microstates) and why do we need another state library?2:42 – Charles answers Chuck’s question. Charles goes to explain that if you need to increment the number, you don’t need to do it with microstates.3:41 – Another suggestion is given on this topic.5:13 – The application isn’t hard in-of-itself.6:45 – Chuck makes comments, and asks: It seems to be more like object-oriented approach?7:44 – Objects compose much more easily. When you are dealing with pure functional code you are de-structuring and restructuring. Check-out LENSES.9:53 – Taras makes comments. What were your inspirations for microstate?10:27 – Charles: The personal journey it started for me started back in 2015. When I was working primarily in Ember.” Charles makes a reference to OM, check it out!15:40 – Charles: “We had a goal in mind, and we kept that goal on mind and kept ‘dipping into the candy jar.’ We had to learn about the functional mumbo-jumbo. The goal was never to use those things. Whatever tools we needed from the functional world, we borrowed from freely.”16:50 – Chuck asks a question.17:00 – Taras answers chuck’s question.19:58 – Charles (guest) keeps the conversation going and goes into detail about how to handle different scenarios with different tools.21:00 – Question: How do you think microstate enters into this situation?21:45 – The design of microstate is that it gives you a solution that is flexible. Other options aren’t as comprehensive like where you can use it; for example Redux.23:49 – Another way to say it is...check-out this timestamp to hear other ideas about this topic.24:53 – Digital Ocean’s Advertisement25:28 – Conversation is back into swing.Question: There is a very interesting design with people who are not developers. What are the benefits or do they play together?26:41 – As a frontend shop, there is a very clean mapping between state machine and type. The type corresponds to the state transitions, among others. For every state you have a class, and you have a method for every transition. It’s a great design tool.29:07 – We don’t talk about states very often, right now, but in the near future we will. The valuable goals for us are to give people tools that will work correctly for them. To help people be more productive that is a great goal. One thing from people, I’ve learned, is to ask yourself ‘what needs to change?’33:03 – Now you are touching on the subject of teaching. What about mentoring with microstates?33:26 – Success (to one of the panelists) is defined of how confident a person is with X program or tool. If they have ease, then they are on the right path. With mentoring in microstates the design speaks its purpose, the transitions are clear, so the panelist feels that he doesn’t really have to go into a lot of detail explaining the features.36:25 – In the React community... 39:12 – Curious: Would we really be able to distribute state like how we distribute components? What is out-of-reach now, is that we have the state machine for the autocomplete component.40:27 – Chuck: Is there a way to test microstates?41:28 – Shameless plug...check it out!42:31 – Anything else? Microstates and Microstates with React.42:48 – If anyone is interested in this, then we are interested in talking with these people and/or companies.43:29 – Let’s go to Picks!43:31 – Advertisement for Charles Max Wood’s course!Links: Kendo UI OM Frontside Redux Microstates Microstates with React Taras Mankovski’s Twitter Taras Mankovski’s GitHub Taras Mankovski’s LinkedIn Taras Mankovski’s Frontside Bio Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio Schedule Once Ruby on Rails Angular Get A Coder Job Sponsors: Kendo UI Digital Ocean Get A Coder Job Picks:Charles (Chuck) Framework Summit – Chuck will be talking at this conference in UT. Ebook – Finding a Job. Prelaunch in August. Final version launches on Labor Day. Lucas Take care of your health! Martial Arts and Jujitsu Nutrition Charles (guest) Fantasy Land JS - Tom Harding Funcadelic.JS Taras (guest) BigTest Special Guests: Charles Lowell and Taras Mankovski.

52mins

11 Sep 2018

Episode artwork

RRU 028: “Microstates.js – Composable State Primitive” with Taras Mankovski & Charles Lowell

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

Panel: Charles (Chuck) Max Wood Lucas Reis Special Guests: Charles Lowell & Taras Mankovski In this episode, the panel talks with two special guests Charles and Taras. Charles Lowell is a principle engineer at Frontside, and he loves to code. Taras works with Charles and joined Frontside, because of Charles’ love for coding. There are great personalities at Frontside, which are quite diverse. Check out this episode to hear about microstates, microstates with react, OM, Redux, and much more! Show Topics: 2:32 – Chuck: Why do we need it (microstates) and why do we need another state library? 2:42 – Charles answers Chuck’s question. Charles goes to explain that if you need to increment the number, you don’t need to do it with microstates. 3:41 – Another suggestion is given on this topic. 5:13 – The application isn’t hard in-of-itself. 6:45 – Chuck makes comments, and asks: It seems to be more like object-oriented approach? 7:44 – Objects compose much more easily. When you are dealing with pure functional code you are de-structuring and restructuring. Check-out LENSES. 9:53 – Taras makes comments. What were your inspirations for microstate? 10:27 – Charles: The personal journey it started for me started back in 2015. When I was working primarily in Ember.” Charles makes a reference to OM, check it out! 15:40 – Charles: “We had a goal in mind, and we kept that goal on mind and kept ‘dipping into the candy jar.’ We had to learn about the functional mumbo-jumbo. The goal was never to use those things. Whatever tools we needed from the functional world, we borrowed from freely.” 16:50 – Chuck asks a question. 17:00 – Taras answers chuck’s question. 19:58 – Charles (guest) keeps the conversation going and goes into detail about how to handle different scenarios with different tools. 21:00 – Question: How do you think microstate enters into this situation? 21:45 – The design of microstate is that it gives you a solution that is flexible. Other options aren’t as comprehensive like where you can use it; for example Redux. 23:49 – Another way to say it is...check-out this timestamp to hear other ideas about this topic. 24:53 – Digital Ocean’s Advertisement 25:28 – Conversation is back into swing. Question: There is a very interesting design with people who are not developers. What are the benefits or do they play together? 26:41 – As a frontend shop, there is a very clean mapping between state machine and type. The type corresponds to the state transitions, among others. For every state you have a class, and you have a method for every transition. It’s a great design tool. 29:07 – We don’t talk about states very often, right now, but in the near future we will. The valuable goals for us are to give people tools that will work correctly for them. To help people be more productive that is a great goal. One thing from people, I’ve learned, is to ask yourself ‘what needs to change?’ 33:03 – Now you are touching on the subject of teaching. What about mentoring with microstates? 33:26 – Success (to one of the panelists) is defined of how confident a person is with X program or tool. If they have ease, then they are on the right path. With mentoring in microstates the design speaks its purpose, the transitions are clear, so the panelist feels that he doesn’t really have to go into a lot of detail explaining the features. 36:25 – In the React community...  39:12 – Curious: Would we really be able to distribute state like how we distribute components? What is out-of-reach now, is that we have the state machine for the autocomplete component. 40:27 – Chuck: Is there a way to test microstates? 41:28 – Shameless plug...check it out! 42:31 – Anything else? Microstates and Microstates with React. 42:48 – If anyone is interested in this, then we are interested in talking with these people and/or companies. 43:29 – Let’s go to Picks! 43:31 – Advertisement for Charles Max Wood’s course! Links: Kendo UI OM Frontside Redux Microstates Microstates with React Taras Mankovski’s Twitter Taras Mankovski’s GitHub Taras Mankovski’s LinkedIn Taras Mankovski’s Frontside Bio Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio Schedule Once Ruby on Rails Angular Get A Coder Job Sponsors: Kendo UI Digital Ocean Get A Coder Job Picks: Charles (Chuck) Framework Summit – Chuck will be talking at this conference in UT. Ebook – Finding a Job. Prelaunch in August. Final version launches on Labor Day. Lucas Take care of your health! Martial Arts and Jujitsu Nutrition Charles (guest) Fantasy Land JS - Tom Harding Funcadelic.JS Taras (guest) BigTest

52mins

11 Sep 2018