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Dred Scott

56 Podcast Episodes

Latest 8 Feb 2023 | Updated Daily

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Part 3: Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857) Majority Opinion (African American Citizenship)

What SCOTUS Wrote Us

We continue reading the third and final segment of the 1857 opinion of the Court in Dred Scott v. Sandford.  I omit citations to provide a better listening experience. Find the full opinion here: https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/60us393

1hr 26mins

1 Sep 2022

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Part 2: Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857) Majority Opinion (African American Citizenship)

What SCOTUS Wrote Us

We continue reading the 1857 opinion of the Court in Dred Scott v. Sandford where we left off in Part 1 .  I omit citations to provide a better listening experience. Find the full opinion here: https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/60us393

40mins

1 Sep 2022

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Part 1: Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857) Majority Opinion (African American Citizenship)

What SCOTUS Wrote Us

Audio of the 1857 opinion of the Court in Dred Scott v. Sandford. For the next several episodes, I'll be reading an opinion from 1857 that has long since been overturned and relegated to the trash heap of bad Supreme Court decisions - Dred Scott v. Sandford. In the Dred Scott decision, the Taney Court held that African Americans, slave or free, were not citizens of the United States. I've decided to read this opinion over several episodes for two reasons: one is that it is incredibly lengthy and the other is that its contents shock the conscience. By this, I mean that its contents are so racist and offensive that both the listener and the reader are likely to need a little time to recover in-between each segment. I do want to warn those listening, especially those listening with African ancestry, that this opinion is incredibly insulting and no longer has any place in United States constitutional law save for its historical evidence of the stain of slavery. I omit citations to provide a better listening experience. Find the full opinion here: https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/60us393 Music by Epidemic Sound

1hr 12mins

31 Aug 2022

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Dred Scott, the Worst Ruling Ever

History As It Happens

The U.S. Supreme Court, one of our bedrock judicial institutions, has been on the wrong side of history time and again. But as the arbiter of the Constitution, the Supreme Court is indispensable to the functioning of democracy. In this episode, esteemed constitutional scholar Akhil Amar discusses some of the court's most notorious rulings, starting with Dred Scott in 1857. And as the current court appears poised to overturn Roe v. Wade, Amar draws parallels between Roe and Dred Scott that explain why the robed justices have never been beyond the reach of criticism for, in the eyes of the critics, botching the Constitution.

47mins

31 May 2022

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The Infamous Dred Scott US Supreme Court Decision

Think About It with Jayden Miller

The Dred Scott case, also known as Dred Scott v. Sandford, was a decade-long fight for freedom by a Black enslaved man named Dred Scott. The case persisted through several courts and ultimately reached the U.S. Supreme Court, whose decision incensed abolitionists, gave momentum to the anti-slavery movement and served as a stepping stone to the Civil War.

40mins

4 Apr 2022

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Why is everyone googling "Dred Scott" - Professor Josh Blackman on Ketanji Brown Jackson's SCOTUS confirmation hearings

The Smerconish Podcast

Michael offers his analysis of the senate confirmation hearings this week of Supreme Court Nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson, and then speaks with South Texas College of Law, Houston, Professor Josh Blackman, author of "An Introduction to Constitutional Law: 100 Supreme Court Cases Everyone Should Know." Original air date 23 March 2022.

33mins

23 Mar 2022

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Dred Scott’s descendant, Lynne Jackson, has a lot to teach us about racial reconciliation

The Gloria Purvis Podcast

“Our word isn’t racism. It’s relationship.” Those are the words of Lynne Jackson, the great great grand-daughter of Dred Scott. Lynne joins the Gloria Purvis Podcast to discuss the Dred Scott decision and its ripple effects today. In 1852, Dred sued the state of Missouri for his freedom, invoking the law “once free always free” after living in the free state of Illinois. Ultimately, his case was denied by Chief Justice Roger Taney, who ruled by the changing political tide and pervading racism of the time.Lynne Jackson founded the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation to commemorate her ancestor’s story, to continue education around racial justice, and to reconcile the descendants of formerly enslaved people with the descendants of slave-owners.  Jackson herself was able to meet the descendants of Roger Taney. And together they have spoken before colleges and legislatures, testifying to the impact of Scott’s historical case as it altered the course of U.S. history and continues to ring through the generations. “I was just grateful that we had come to a point in our country where we could have of these two families speak together and know each other and respect each other,” says Jaconson, “And have a moment where we could say we aren't our ancestors and we want to see a better day for all of our children in our country.”In addition to modeling racial reconciliation between families today, The Dred Scott Heritage Foundation raised $250,000 to commission the only statue of Dred Scott and his wife Harriet, which stand outside the Old Courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri.  There still is no postage stamp for Dred Scott. The Foundation started a Dred Scott Stamp Campaign to solicit required petitions and you can help by going to their website, www.dredscottlives.org and checking out the campaign. Lynne Jackson is available for speaking engagements and can be reached through the website at info@thedredscottfoundation.org or 314-532-5613. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

41mins

8 Mar 2022

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When the Supreme Court Got It Wrong: Civil Rights and Dred Scott

Civics 101

In 1846, Dred and Harriet Scott were living in St. Louis, Missouri with their two daughters. They were enslaved and launched a not uncommon petition: a lawsuit for their freedom. Eleven years later Chief Justice Roger B. Taney would issue an opinion on their case that not only refused their freedom but attempted to cement the fate of all Black individuals in the United States.  This episode is a broadcast special that aired across the nation on NPR, and is two parts: our episode on how the Supreme Court works, and part one of our series on landmark civil rights cases: Dred Scott v Sandford. 

50mins

1 Mar 2022

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Dred Scott North continued

Bagland Podcast

in Dred Scott North pt we discuss, why MN is setting a new precedent, Foundational Blacks sponsoring the Motherland? Like, share, and subscribe on youtube: Baglandpodcast

1hr 54mins

21 Feb 2022

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S5 Ep01 Dred Scott: A Fight for Freedom

Your History Your Story

On April 6th 1846 the “Dred Scott Case” first went to trial in St. Louis, Missouri’s Old Court House. The case involved an enslaved couple, Dred and Harriet Scott, who filed suit against their owner to gain their freedom.  They did this based on the fact that they had once lived in “free territory” and should therefore have been emancipated based on the doctrine of “once free, always free”, previously recognized by Missouri courts. Little did the Scott’s know, that eleven years and several court cases later, the question of their freedom would be brought before the US Supreme Court and would result in the horrendous “Dred Scott Decision”.  That decision would serve as a major catalyst for the turbulent events leading up to the American Civil War. In this episode of Your History Your Story, our guest is Lynne Jackson, the great, great granddaughter of Dred and Harriet Scott and the President & Founder of the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation.  Lynne will be sharing the fascinating story of her courageous ancestors who persevered in their pursuit of freedom.  Picture(s): Courtesy of Lynne Jackson Music: "With Loved Ones" Jay Man

1hr

17 Jan 2022

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