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Max Planck Institute

13 Podcast Episodes

Latest 6 Aug 2022 | Updated Daily

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Body Models Driving the Age of the Avatar – with Michael J. Black, Director, Perceiving Systems Department, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems

Unboxing AI: The Podcast for Computer Vision Engineers

In this episode of Unboxing AI, I host Michael J. Black from the Max Planck Institute. We speak about body models, his journeys in industry and academia, representing all human body types and the age of the avatar. Michael explains about the early days of computer vision, his experiences commercializing body models through his startup, Body Labs, and how the metaverse and our avatars will revolutionize our everyday lives. Episode transcript and more at UnboxingAI.show TOPICS & TIMESTAMPS 00:39 Guest Intro 01:41 What are body models and why are they so useful? 04:17 Human interpretability - important or not? 05:32 Real use cases for body models 10:54 History of body model development leading to SMPL 19:21 Body model development beyond SMPL: MANO, FLAME, SMPL-X, and more 22:11 Edge cases: dealing with unique body shapes 24:45 Early days of computer vision 27:37 Working at Xerox PARC 30:00 Shifting to academia 31:30 The vision for Perceiving Systems at MPI-IS 34:15 Innovation and team structure at Perceiving Systems 37:40 Perceiving Systems - similarities to a startup 40:38 Founding Body Labs 45:30 Body Labs' Acquisition by Amazon 47:24 Distinguished Amazon Scholar role 49:03 About Meshcapade 50:05 What is the metaverse? 50:56 The age of the avatar 56:32 Career Tips for Computer Vision Engineers LINKS AND RESOURCES Michael J. Black @ MPI-IS LinkedIn Google Scholar Twitter YouTube Papers at CVPR 2022 BEV OSSO EMOCA Body Models SMPL FLAME MANO SMPL-X STAR SCAPE About Meshcapade Website GitHub Instagram About Perceiving Systems Overview Video Website GUEST BIO Our guest is Michael J. Black, one of the founding directors of the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, Germany. He completed his PhD in computer science at Yale University, his postdoc at the University of Toronto, and has co-authored over 200 peer-reviewed papers to date. His research focuses on understanding humans and their behavior in video, working at the boundary of computer vision, machine learning, and computer graphics. His work on realistic 3D human body models such as SMPL has been widely used in both academia and industry, and in 2017, the start-up he co-founded to commercialize these technologies was acquired by Amazon. Today, Michael and his teams at MPI are developing exciting new capabilities in computer vision that will be important for the future of 3D avatars, the metaverse and beyond. ABOUT THE HOST I’m Gil Elbaz, Co-founder and CTO of Datagen. In this podcast, I speak with interesting computer vision thinkers and practitioners. I ask the big questions that touch on the issues and challenges that ML and CV engineers deal with every day. On the way, I hope you uncover a new subject or gain a different perspective, as well as enjoying engaging conversation. It’s about much more than the technical processes – it’s about people, journeys, and ideas. Turn up the volume, insights inside.

59mins

14 Jul 2022

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Ralf Jungmann (Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry and LMU)

The Microscopists

#41 — Ralf Jungmann, Professor and group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry and LMU Munich joins Peter O'Toole in this episode of The Microscopists to discuss the most frightening time in his career, how moving back to Germany from the US was the biggest culture shock and why writing grants is so important. Ralf also shares how 80s TV influenced his career, his obsession with the direction of air vents and why data science is the future.Watch or Listen to all episodes of The Microscopists here: http://bit.ly/the-microscopists-pds#TheMicroscopists #microscopy #imageanalysis

1hr 3mins

18 Mar 2022

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The Milky Way Galaxy with Stefan Gillessen, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics

The Cosmic Companion - Astronomy, Space, Technology Advancing Humanity

This week on The Cosmic Companion, we take a look at our home galaxy, the Milky Way. We will be talking with Stefan Gillessen from the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics about his work understanding Sagittarius A*— the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy.  Released under Creative Commons 2.0 2022--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-cosmic-companion/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-cosmic-companion/support Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe

25mins

19 Jan 2022

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Episode 18: Interview with Prof. Joyce Poon from the Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics by Dmitry Zimin

LIGHT WAVE

28mins

23 Sep 2021

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636: 1/2 Birth of a proto-star Solar System like ours. Dominique Segura-Cox, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Astrophysics. Nature Magazine.

The John Batchelor Show

Image:  Star formation:  LH 95 stellar nursery in the Large Magellanic Cloud    The fascination and joy of the recent article in Nature Magazine, 8 October, 3020, "Four Annular structures in a protostellar disk less than 500,000 years old."  Dominique Segura-Cox, astronomy graduate student at the University of Illinois, and Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, in re: Her discovery of a new class of baby stars using the VLA. A baby star, IRS-63 (class 1 proto-star): bright yellow center, with a scattershot of gas around it.  Theory is that stars and planets are married; what’s interesting about this star: clear lanes of material that had been swept out, made grooves in the disc.  (Constellation: Man Grasping a Snake).  Star didn't even exist 500,000 years ago. Neanderthals staring at sky seeing its birth. Giant dust clouds collapse to make [stars and planets?]  Is 144 parsecs from Earth.  . . . Gap 1 and Gap 2.  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2779-6

14mins

29 Oct 2020

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636: 2/2 Birth of a proto-star Solar System like ours. Dominique Segura-Cox, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Astrophysics. Nature Magazine.

The John Batchelor Show

Image:  The star-forming nebula W51 is one of the largest "star factories" in the Milky Way galaxy. Interstellar dust blocks the visible light emitted by the region, but it is revealed by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, which captures infrared light that can penetrate dust clouds. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech  The fascination and joy of the recent article in Nature Magazine, 8 October, 3020, "Four Annular structures in a protostellar disk less than 500,000 years old."  Dominique Segura-Cox, @maxplanckpress, astronomy graduate student at the University of Illinois, and Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, in re: Her discovery of a new class of baby stars using the VLA. H9w to get from dust to a star? . . .  Something eerily similar about IRS-63 and our own Solar System.    . . .  It may be favorable for life in 5 billion years—when our own Sun has turned into a white dwarf.   https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2779-6

10mins

29 Oct 2020

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Kerstin Göpfrich, Ph.D. (Max Planck Institute for Medical Research )

SPOTL]i[GHT - Nanion Technologies

Meet: Kerstin Göpfrich, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research. Kerstin works on synthetic biology combining DNA nanotechnology and microfluidics to assemble synthetic cells.  You can learn more about Kerstin and her work here

13mins

19 Oct 2020

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Like Fish, Like Human: New Research That Might Shed Light on Longevity—Dario Valenzano–Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, CECAD

Finding Genius Podcast

As a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne, Germany, Dario Valenzano is trying to understand the molecular and genetic bases underlying differences between lifespans and ageing processes of different species, and how we might be able to manipulate our own. In this episode, you will learn: Why the daughters of older fathers have a slighter shorter lifespan than those of younger fathers How the shortest-lived vertebrate known to exist might shed light on human evolution and the development of human disease in late life How microbiota composition in the gastrointestinal tract changes during ageing  Some species live for just a few hours, while others live for thousands of years. Why and how have species evolved such different lifespans, and how might the answer to these questions allow us to increase our own longevity and reduce the risk of many diseases? These questions form the cornerstone of the research being carried out by Valenzano and his group. As a model organism for this research, the team is using the African turquoise killifish, which is the shortest-lived vertebrate known to exist. This fish lives approximately four months both in the lab and in its natural environment. In studying how this species evolved to be so short-lived, they have found that Darwinian selection has little to do with it; rather, Valenzano says its short lifespan came about as a mere accident. For this type of fish, there is little advantage to being long-lived, and without selective pressure to survive for a long time, selection doesn’t act to remove deleterious mutations in late life. Valenzano explains what this might reveal about human evolution, and in particular, late-life weakened selection in humans that fails to remove deleterious mutations which result in diseases like dementia. Valenzano also discusses their research on the microbiome of fish, mice, and humans, which includes a look at how the microbiome changes over time and during the ageing process, and how microbes interact with the immune system during the ageing process.    Tune in for the full conversation and visit https://www.age.mpg.de/science/research-laboratories/valenzano/ to learn more.

42mins

8 May 2020

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Interview of Dr. Hanieh Fattahi with Prof. Gerd Lecuhs from Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light

LIGHT WAVE

23mins

10 Mar 2019

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Interview of Johannes Ehrmaier with Prof. Vahid Sandoghdar from Max Planck Institute for the science of light (MPL)

LIGHT WAVE

25mins

26 Nov 2018

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