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John D. Rockefeller

29 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Jan 2023 | Updated Daily

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Beating Rockefeller | The Devil and John D. Rockefeller | 4

Business Movers

With the Supreme Court and Royal Dutch/Shell waging war on Standard Oil, John watches the company he’s spent his life building fall apart. But the break-up of Standard nets John more money than he’s ever had, and he spends much of the rest of his life trying to give it away. To listen to Business Movers ad-free, join Wondery+ in the Wondery App. Click here to download the app: https://wondery.app.link/businessmoversSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

36mins

15 Sep 2022

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[S3E8] Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.

Business Books & Co.

Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. is an epic biography of the industrialist by acclaimed author Ron Chernow. Rockefeller was the founder of Standard Oil, a company that was notorious for its monopolization of the oil industry in the late 19th century. An adept businessman and talented strategist, Rockefeller was demonized throughout his career for his sometimes brutal tactics. During the latter half of his life, Rockefeller became America’s foremost philanthropist, establishing a pattern of giving that has been emulated by many later tycoons. In this episode we’ll discuss John D. Rockefeller’s life, work, the economics of the late 19th century oil industry, and the lasting legacy of Standard Oil. Show Notes Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow via Amazon Ron Chernow via Wikipedia Follow us on Twitter @BusinessBooksCo and join our Amazon book club. Edited by Giacomo Guatteri Find out more at http://businessbooksandco.com

1hr 17mins

6 Sep 2022

Similar People

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Episode 89: Channeling History - 22.07.03 - John D. Rockefeller

Channeling History

In this episode of Channeling History, we interview the spirit of the famous industrialist, John D. Rockefeller.  He speaks of his life and his incredible acts of philanthropy.  

58mins

4 Jul 2022

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#248 Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller

Founders

What I learned from reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller by Ron Chernow. [2:15]  Rockefeller trained himself to reveal as little as possible[4:22] Once Rockefeller set his mind to something he brought awesome powers of concentration to bear.[4:44] My whole life has been spent trying to teach people that intense concentration for hour after hour can bring out in people resources they didn’t know they had. —Edwin Land[9:00] When playing checkers or chess, he showed exceptional caution, studying each move at length, working out every possible countermove in his head. "I'll move just as soon as I get it figured out," he told opponents who tried to rush him. "You don't think I'm playing to get beaten, do you?"[9:20] To ensure that he won, he submitted to games only where he could dictate the rules. Despite his slow, ponderous style, once he had thoroughly mulled over his plan of action, he had the power of quick decision.[14:49] When John was child, Bill would urge him to leap from his high chair into his waiting arms. One day he dropped his arms letting his astonished son crash to the floor. Remember, Bill lectured him, never trust anyone completely. Not even me.[15:32] The Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst by David Nasaw (Founders #145) He didn't care what people thought of him and despised society.[16:13] Rockefeller analyzed work, broke it down into component parts, and figured out how to perform it most economically.[18:49] He was a confirmed exponent of positive thinking.[19:10] Rockefeller was the sort of stubborn person who only grew more determined with rejection.[25:14] Rockefeller wasn't one to dawdle in an unprofitable concern. His career had few wasted steps, and he never vacillated when the moment ripened for advancement.[26:20] He's constantly praising adversity in early life as giving him strength to deal with all the stuff he had to deal with later on his life.[26:49] Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power by James McGrath Morris. (Founders #135) He was so industrious that he became a positive annoyance to others who felt less inclined to work.[27:17] Your future hangs on every day that passes.[36:13] If it is of critical importance to your business you have to do it yourself.[36:42] In-N-Out Burger: A Behind-the-Counter Look at the Fast-Food Chain That Breaks All the Rules by Stacy Perman. (Founders #244)[38:36] He would never experience a single year of loss.[39:30] Two quotes from Charlie Munger:The wise ones bet heavily when the world offers them that opportunity. They bet big when they have the odds. And the rest of the time, they don't. It's just that simple. Poor Charlie's Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger. (Founders #90)You should remember that good ideas are rare—when the odds are greatly in your favor, bet heavily. Tao of Charlie Munger: A Compilation of Quotes from Berkshire Hathaway's Vice Chairman on Life, Business, and the Pursuit of Wealth With Commentary by David Clark (Founders #78)[41:03] He's gonna to have a massive advantage over other people who only wanted to book short-term profits.[42:01]  The Clarks were the first of many business partners to underrate the audacity of the quietly calculating Rockefeller, who bided his time as he figured out how to get rid of them.[44:27] He's super frugal on one end of the spectrum. Extremely frugal! Not going to let his business waste a penny. But he's also —on the very other end of the spectrum— willing to spend and to borrow and to go big. I will borrow every single dollar the banks will give me. He is the weird combination of extreme frugality and extreme boldness.[46:08]  Conspiracy: Peter Thiel, Hulk Hogan, Gawker, and the Anatomy of Intrigue by Ryan Holiday (Founders 31)  On that day his partners “woke up and saw for the first time that my mind had not been idle while they were talking so big and loud,” he would say later. They were shocked. They’d seen their empire dismantled and taken from them by the young man they had dismissed. Rockefeller had wanted it more.[47:13] On that day his partners “woke up and saw for the first time that my mind had not been idle while they were talking so big and loud,” he would say later. They were shocked. They’d seen their empire dismantled and taken from them by the young man they had dismissed. Rockefeller had wanted it more.[47:37] He would never again feel his advancement blocked by shortsighted, mediocre men.[48:16] From this point forward, there would be no zigzags or squandered energy, only a single-minded focus on objectives that would make him both the wonder and terror of American business.[48:38] Random Reminiscences of Men and Events by John D. Rockefeller. (Founders #148) We devoted ourselves exclusively to the oil business and its products. That company never went into outside ventures, but kept to the enormous task of perfecting its own organization.[55:02] He always kept plentiful cash reserves. He won many bidding contests simply because his war chest was deeper.[55:46] Alexander the Great: The Brief Life and Towering Exploits of History's Greatest Conqueror--As Told By His Original Biographers by Arrian, Plutarch, and Quintus Curtius Rufus. (Founders #232)[1:05:37] Twenty-nine-year-old John D. Rockefeller demanded that seventy four-year-old Commodore Vanderbilt, the emperor of the railroad world, come to him. This refusal to truckle, bend, or bow to others, this insistence on dealing with other people on his own terms, time, and turf, distinguished Rockefeller throughout his career.[1:11:07] The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance by Ron Chernow. (Founders #139)[1:14:16] This is the investment opportunity of a lifetime and they're running in the opposite direction.[1:23:37] His master plan was to be implemented in a thousand secret, disguised, and indirect ways.[1:26:37] I have ways of making money you know nothing about.[1:30:59] You don't have any ambition to drive fast horses, do you?[1:32:59] Risk Game: Self Portrait of an Entrepreneur by Francis Greenburger. (Founders #243)[1:34:42] He was now living a fantasy of extravagant wealth and few people beyond the oil business had ever even heard of him.[1:35:33] Big Brown: The Untold Story of UPS by Greg Niemann. (Founders #192)[1:36:00] American high society in the 20th century would be loaded with descendants of those refiners who opted for stock.[1:39:02]  Enzo Ferrari: Power, Politics, and the Making of an Automobile Empire by Luca Dal Monte (Founders #98)[1:39:30] Success comes from keeping the ears open and the mouth closed.[1:40:22] Do not many of us who fail to achieve big things, fail because we lack concentration-the art of concentrating the mind on the thing to be done at the proper time and to the exclusion of everything else?[1:42:31] Copy This!: How I turned Dyslexia, ADHD, and 100 square feet into a company called Kinkos by Paul Orfalea. (Founders #181)[1:42:40] Part of the Standard Oil gospel was to train your subordinate to do your job. As Rockefeller instructed a recruit, "Has anyone given you the law of these offices? No? It is this: nobody does anything if he can get anybody else to do it. As soon as you can, get some one whom you can rely on, train him in the work, sit down, cock up your heels, and think out some way for the Standard Oil to make some money.” True to this policy, Rockefeller tried to extricate himself from the intricate web of administrative details and dedicate more of his time to broad policy decisions.[1:49:50] He entered retirement just at the birth of the American automobile industry. The automobile would make John D. Rockefeller far richer in retirement than at work.----Subscribe to listen to Founders Premium — Subscribers can ask me questions directly which I will answer in Ask Me Anything (AMA) episodes ----“I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested, so my poor wallet suffers. ”— GarethBe like Gareth. Buy a book: All the books featured on Founders Podcast

1hr 50mins

28 May 2022

Most Popular

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John D. Rockefeller with Zach Brazao

Give Me a Name

Ben and comedian Zach Brazao (@zachbrazao) go over both the brutal and magnanimous sides of the richest man in American history, John D. Rockefeller.

42mins

25 Jan 2022

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EP20 - Forrest Gump versus John D. Rockefeller - leveraging successful business habits for your ESOP.

The Journey to an ESOP

This episode explores the 10 Rockefeller habits to help companies assess their business on their journey to an esop as to areas to improve as well as providing specific areas to support strengthening their leadership teams.

34mins

17 Jun 2021

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John D. Rockefeller: Robber Baron or Productive Genius?

The Hero Show

“We had vision. We saw the vast possibilities of the oil industry, stood at the center of it, and brought our knowledge and imagination and business experience to bear in a dozen, in twenty, in thirty directions.” —John D. Rockefeller Subscribe in Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you’re listening right now. If you’d like to suggest a heroic figure to be covered on the show, send an email to Jon@ObjectiveStandard.org. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/objectivestandard Twitter: https://twitter.com/ObjStdInstitute LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/objectivestandardinstitute/ Also check out: “Vindicating Capitalism: The Real History of the Standard Oil Company” by Alex Epstein: https://theobjectivestandard.com/2008/05/standard-oil-company/ The Capitalist Manifesto by Andrew Bernstein: https://amzn.to/3qzbKKL

1hr 7mins

15 Jan 2021

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#148 The Autobiography of John D. Rockefeller

Founders

What I learned from Random Reminiscences of Men and Events by John D. Rockefeller. [0:16] These incidents which come to my mind to speak of seemed vitally important to me when they happened, and they still stand out distinctly in my memory. [2:43] That sounds funny, making friends among the eminent dead, but if you go through life making friends with the eminent dead who had the right ideas, I think it will work better in life and work better in education. — Charlie Munger [3:07] On Founders #16 I covered the biography of Rockefeller. Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller. [3:19] Rockefeller prioritized silence and using the element of surprise by not telling people what he was up to. [3:54] The book I read for Founders #31 Conspiracy: Peter Thiel, Hulk Hogan, Gawker, and the Anatomy of Intrigue by Ryan Holiday. [5:02] They woke up and saw for the first time that my mind had not been idle while they were talking so big and loud. [5:35] He's attempting to buy out one of his competitors and he says, “I have ways of making money that you know nothing about.” [6:00] One thing that he mentioned over and over again in this book is the importance of relationships. That relationships make life better. [7:45] Having created an empire of unfathomable complexity, he was smart enough to see that he had to submerge his identity in the organization. [13:01] We went pretty rapidly in those days. We had with us a group of courageous men who recognized the great principle that a business cannot be a great success that does not fully and efficiently accept and take advantage of its opportunities. [15:52] It was a friendship founded on business, which Mr. Flagler used to say was a good deal better than a business founded on friendship, and my experience leads me to agree with him. [18:09] Perhaps they will not be useless if even tiresome stories make young people realize how, above all other possessions, is the value of a friend in every department of life without any exception whatsoever. [20:26] I know of nothing more despicable and pathetic than a man who devotes all the waking hours of the day to making money for money’s sake. [24:35] This casual way of conducting affairs did not appeal to me. [28:07] I grew up watching Michael Jordan play. My generation saw the highlights. They saw the fancy stuff. What I saw was his footwork. I saw the spacing. I saw the timing. I saw the fundamentals of the game. [30:58] Go to sleep on a win and you wake up with a loss: As our successes began to come, I seldom put my head upon the pillow at night without speaking a few words to myself in this wise: “Now a little success, soon you will fall down, soon you will be overthrown. Because you have got a start, you think you are quite a merchant; look out, or you will lose your head — go steady.” These intimate conversations with myself had a great influence on my life. I was afraid I could not stand my prosperity and tried to teach myself not to get puffed up with any foolish notions. [34:58] If the present managers of the company were to relax efforts, allow the quality of their product to degenerate, or treat their customers badly, how long would their business last? About as long as any other neglected business. [38:04] Meet your troubles head-on: I have spoken of the necessity of being frank and honest with oneself about one’s own affairs. Many people assume that they can get away from the truth by avoiding thinking about it, but the natural law is inevitable, and the sooner it is recognized, the better. [38:49] Don’t deceive yourself by trying to take shortcuts. You have to build a strong foundation for your business and for your life. And that takes time. If you do that correctly you're going to gain a level of efficiency that the people that are looking for shortcuts, and cutting corners, are never going to enjoy. [40:48] We were gradually learning how to conduct a most difficult business. [43:08] Focus. Study how the great fortunes were made. It wasn’t a scattershot approach: We devoted ourselves exclusively to the oil business and its products. The company never went into outside ventures but kept to the enormous task of perfecting its own organization. [44:01] Two people can run the same business and have vastly different results: Amp It Up. [50:27] Don’t even think of temporary or sharp advantages. Don’t waste your effort on a thing which ends in a petty triumph unless you are satisfied with a life of petty success. [54:42] Don’t do anything someone else can do. —Edwin Land: The one thing which such a business philosopher would be most careful to avoid in his investments of time and effort or money, is the unnecessary duplication of existing industries. He would regard all money spent in increasing needless competition as wasted. ----“I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested so my poor wallet suffers. ” — GarethBe like Gareth. Buy a book: All the books featured on Founders Podcast

57mins

11 Oct 2020

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Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller

Founders

What I learned from reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller by Ron Chernow. Subscribe to continue listening and gain access to all full episodes. 

27mins

9 Oct 2020

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The Battle Against the Microbes: How Bill Gates and John D. Rockefeller are Losing the War!- Show 481

Medici Medicine

https://medicienterprises.com/2020/08/08/show-481/

59mins

11 Aug 2020

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