OwlTail

Cover image of George Schaller

George Schaller

5 Podcast Episodes

Latest 26 Nov 2022 | Updated Daily

Episode artwork

Episode 8b: George Schaller (Part 2)

Mammalwatching

Charles Foley and Jon Hall's second part of their interview with George Schaller, widely regarded as the planet's greatest living field biologist.Some follow a career in wildlife biology and dream of discovering new species. Others of uncovering new information on our most charismatic animals. While some yearn to make a genuine impact on conservation. George Schaller has made enormous contributions in all of these areas in a career spanning 70 years. His pioneering work with Mountain Gorillas showed the world for the first time that they were a gentle - not savage - species, and it paved the way for Dian Fossey to begin her work. He went on to work with a set of mammalwatching bucket list species from Snow Leopards and Tigers through Giant Pandas and Gobi Bears. In the early 1990s he helped discover the Saola - the "Asian unicorn" - in Laos, and one of the most remarkable species discoveries of the 20th Century. He has also helped set up over 20 protected areas including the 200,000 square mile Changtang Nature Reserve on the Tibetan plateau. He has won countless awards and written 15 books, one of which - on Lions - won the USA's National Book Award. Legendary does not do him justice.For more information visit www.mammalwatching.com/podcastNotes: Here is an article on Schaller's life and career. He has written hundreds of magazine articles and Op Eds, like this one with Peter Zahler (who we interviewed in Episode 6 of this podcast) and there are many more references in his wikipedia entry. Here is short video about his many achievements. His latest book, Into Wild Mongolia, is published by Yale.Here is more information on the Wildlife Conservation Society's work to protect the few Saola that may be left in Laos and Vietnam.Cover art: George Schaller and a Giant Panda.Dr Charles Foley is a mammalwatcher and biologist who, together with his wife Lara, spent 30 years studying elephants in Tanzania. They now run the Tanzania Conservation Research Program at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago.Jon Hall set up mammalwatching.com in 2005. Genetically Welsh, spiritually Australian, currently in New York City. He has looked for mammals in over 100 countries.Produced and edited by José G. Martínez-Fonseca mammalwatcher, photographer and wildlife biologist.Thanks also to Sierra Foley for her editing skills and patience.

32mins

16 Aug 2021

Episode artwork

Episode 8a: George Schaller (Part 1)

Mammalwatching

Charles Foley and Jon Hall's first part of a two part interview with George Schaller, widely regarded as the planet's greatest living field biologist. Some follow a career in wildlife biology and dream of discovering new species. Others of uncovering new information on our most charismatic animals. While some yearn to make a genuine impact on conservation. George Schaller has made enormous contributions in all of these areas in a career spanning 70 years. His pioneering work with Mountain Gorillas showed the world for the first time that they were a gentle - not savage - species, and it paved the way for Dian Fossey to begin her work. He went on to work with a set of mammalwatching bucket list species from Snow Leopards and Tigers through Giant Pandas and Gobi Bears. In the early 1990s he helped discover the Saola - the "Asian unicorn" - in Laos, and one of the most remarkable species discoveries of the 20th Century. He has also helped set up over 20 protected areas including the 200,000 square mile Changtang Nature Reserve on the Tibetan plateau. He has won countless awards and written 15 books, one of which - on Lions - won the USA's National Book Award. Legendary does not do him justice.For more information visit www.mammalwatching.com/podcastNotes: Here is an article on Schaller's life and career. He has written hundreds of magazine articles and Op Eds, like this one with Peter Zahler (who we interviewed in Episode 6 of this podcast) and there are many more references in his wikipedia entry. Here is short video about his many achievements.  His latest book, Into Wild Mongolia, is published by Yale.Here is more information on the Wildlife Conservation Society's work to protect the few Saola that may be left in Laos and Vietnam.Cover art: A local herdsman and George Schaller with a Snow Leopard they are about to radio collar in Mongolia.Dr Charles Foley is a mammalwatcher and biologist who, together with his wife Lara, spent 30 years studying elephants in Tanzania. They now run the Tanzania Conservation Research Program at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago.Jon Hall set up mammalwatching.com in 2005. Genetically Welsh, spiritually Australian, currently in New York City. He has looked for mammals in over 100 countries.Produced and edited by José G. Martínez-Fonseca mammalwatcher, photographer and wildlife biologist.Thanks also to Sierra Foley for her editing skills and patience.

27mins

12 Aug 2021

Similar People

Episode artwork

Episode 45. Wildlife Biology: George Schaller

Science History Podcast

The study of wildlife has a history full of adventures in remote corners of the Earth, discoveries of remarkable behaviors, and achievements in conservation. George Schaller is a pioneer of the field, with seven decades of work spanning from the Arctic to the Tropics. George was born in Germany in 1933 and immigrated to the United States as a teenager. He received a BS degree from the University of Alaska in 1955 and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1962. He then held positions at Stanford University and Johns Hopkins University before working as a research associate for the Rockefeller University and New York Zoological Society’s Institute for Research in Animal Behavior, beginning in 1966. This program evolved into the Center for Field Biology and Conservation, where George worked as the Coordinator. Beginning in 1979, George directed the New York Zoological Society’s International Conservation Program. George’s many awards reflect his impacts on the conservation of wildlife and ecosystems around the world. These awards include the National Geographic Society Lifetime Achievement Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the World Wildlife Fund Gold Medal, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, and many others. He is also known for his many books on wildlife, including The Mountain Gorilla – Ecology and Behavior, published in 1963, The Year of the Gorilla published in 1964, The Tiger: Its Life in the Wild published in 1969, and The Serengeti Lion: A study of Predator-Prey Relations, published in 1972, for which he received the U.S. National Book Award in Science.

1hr 2mins

11 Aug 2021

Episode artwork

The Feral Biologist: A Talk with George Schaller; A Look in the June <i>SciAm</i>

Science Talk

The Wildlife Conservation Society's George Schaller talks about his new book, "A Naturalist and Other Beasts," which covers his 50 years of documenting important large animal species in the field. And Scientific American editor in chief, John Rennie, offers a look at some articles in the June issue. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.SciAm.com/daily, www.wcs.org

26mins

28 May 2008

Most Popular

Episode artwork

George Schaller

George Schaller

George Schaller is a senior conservationist at the Wildlife Conservation Society in the Bronx, New York. He is a legendary zoologist, naturalist, conservationist, and best-selling author, who is recognized as the world's pre-eminent field biologist, studying wildlife throughout Africa, Asia and South America. Schaller has spent years in the most remote and forbidding places on earth studying the natural history of endangered animals fighting for their survival. He has encountered tigers in the wilds of India, mountain gorillas and lions in Africa, jaguars in the swamps of Brazil, and snow leopards in the Himalayas. His splendid writings are presented with style and stunning imagery, including "The Serengeti Lion" (which received the National Book Award) and "The Mountain Gorilla" (the first book that conveyed to the general public the profound intelligence and gentleness of gorillas in the wild). Schaller has helped establish more than 20 parks or animal reserves around the world, including Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and the Chang Tang Nature Reserve. He is the recipient of the National Geographic Society's Lifetime Achievement Award and the World Wildlife Fund's Gold Medal.

15mins

1 Jul 1988