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Eliot Peper

23 Podcast Episodes

Latest 2 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Eliot Peper, VEIL & Paul Greenberg, THE CLIMATE DIET

Writer's Voice with Francesca Rheannon

We talk with Eliot Peper about his cli-fi novel, Veil. It’s about what happens when a tech CEO decides to geo-engineer the climate—in secret. Then, we catch up with author Paul Greenberg about The Climate Diet: 50 Simple Ways to Trim Your Carbon Footprint. It’s just out for Earth Day. Writer’s Voice — in depth conversation with writers of all genres, on the air since 2004. Rate us on iTunes or whatever podcast app you use! Like us on Facebook at Writers Voice with Francesca Rheannon, find us on Vurbl, or on Twitter @WritersVoice. Eliot Peper A few years ago, climate fiction, or cli-fi, was a sparsely-populated genre. But the growing angst about the climate climate crisis is finding expression in a plethora of new novels. One of the finest is Veil by Eliot Peper. It tackles the conundrum we face because of our failure to tackle climate change on time and to scale: should we geo-engineer the climate to slow the crisis, despite unknown risks? And if so, who should decide? This forms the core of Peper’s novel Veil. In the novel, Peper gives voice to all sides of the question. Should one tech CEO acting alone be allowed to cool the planet? What if his actions cause millions to starve because the monsoon rains fail, possibly as a result? Should the big global powers — many of which got us into the problem in the first place — make the decision? Or should those small, poor countries, like Fiji and other island states be the deciders? All these questions are explored withIn a plot that unfolds like a spellbinding thriller. Kim Stanley Robinson said of Veil, “This is the best kind of science fiction.” In addition to Veil, Eliot Peper is the author of several other novels, including Borderless, Bandwidth, Cumulus, and the Uncommon Series. He is the co-creator of the award-winning True Blue website and the game, Machine Learning President. Read an excerpt from Veil Paul Greenberg Americans need to go on a diet. Not a diet to slim their waistlines—although plenty of us need to do that, too—but a Climate Diet, one that trims CO2 emissions from the atmosphere and gets our companies and governments to do the same. It’s all laid out in 50 diet rules in Paul Greenberg’s new book, The Climate Diet. Greenberg is an award-winning food and environmental writer, author of such books as Four Fish and The Omega Principle. Read the NYT Op-Ed by Paul Greenberg and Carl Safina Next week on Writer’s Voice We talk with bestselling novelist Lisa Scottline about her first historical novel Eternal. And Julia Fine tells us about The Upstairs House, a genre-bending novel about new motherhood. Don’t miss it! The post Eliot Peper, VEIL & Paul Greenberg, THE CLIMATE DIET appeared first on Writer's Voice.

57mins

27 Apr 2021

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Independent Bookstore Day! Eliot Peper, author

The Bookshop Podcast

Hi,This is the third interview I’m releasing today to celebrate Independent Bookstore Day. Eliot Peper is a novelist based in Oakland, CA. You can find Eliot Peper’s books at your local indie bookshop and order them through  bookshop.org or wherever books are sold. He is the author of Veil, Breach, Borderless, Bandwidth, Cumulus, Neon Fever Dream, and the Uncommon Series, and his books have earned praise from Seth Godin, Kim Stanley Robinson, Malka Older, Cory Doctorow, Tim O'Reilly, Amal El-Mohtar, and Ev Williams, as well as the New York Times Book Review, BBC, Popular Science, Businessweek, San Francisco Magazine, Newsweek, io9, Boing Boing, Publisher's Weekly, and Ars Technica.Eliot publishes a blog and sends a monthly newsletter documenting his journey as a reader and writer. Enjoy!Here are the links for this episode:Eliot PeperEliot Peper Books – Bookshop.orgAri Popper - SciFutures The Bookshop Podcast episodeLittle Brother, Cory Doctorow So You Want to Publish a Book? Anne TrubekLittle Big, John CrowleyEliot Peper - Twitter Support the show (https://paypal.me/TheBookshopPodcast?locale.x=en_US)

56mins

24 Apr 2021

Similar People

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Eliot Peper talks to reviewer 2 about his Novel 'Veil', a dystopian near future shaped by geoengineering

Reviewer 2 does geoengineering

Eliot Peper is the author of Veil, one of only a handful of novels written about SRM. He talks to Andrew on the show about his interest in the subject, and the creative and business process of being a novelist. This episode is a super interesting foray into a fiction genre of which both of us at reviewer 2 are big fans, (Clare is reading it at the moment). Eliot is a successful writer and has written a number of novels which you can find at his website below.  https://www.eliotpeper.com https://twitter.com/eliotpeper

1hr 15mins

30 Mar 2021

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show #295: eliot peper ponders the big questions

podcast – the drax files radio hour

eliot peper came to “town” [or the club?] to discuss his analog trilogy [bandwidth, borderless and breach]. in a bit over 60 minutes we of course could only scratch the surface of the intersection of big ideas in fiction and imagining them being applied to the “real world”. enjoy the conversation with this profilic and... Read More

22 Feb 2021

Most Popular

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Eliot Peper | Making Sense of the World through Storytelling

Life Profitability

Eliot Peper is the author of nine novels and a practicing independent consultant for several Fortune 100 companies. In his writing, he bends and blends traditional genres to explore the intersection of technology and culture. In this episode, Adii and Eliot discuss the intersection of Eliot’s roles and storytelling, how forgetting can be a superpower, and the importance of labels.

46mins

31 Jul 2020

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52: Author Eliot Peper on geoengineering

Tech Hygiene

In this episode we bring back Eliot Peper whose new book, Veil, explores the future of climate change.

25mins

27 Mar 2020

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Eliot Peper, "Breach" (47North, 2019)

New Books in Science Fiction

The massive corporation at the center of Eliot Peper’s Analog trilogy, which he completed last month with the publication of Breach (47North, 2019) is radically different from most science fictional companies. It aspires to do good.The growth of Commonwealth into a benevolent behemoth is chronicled in the series’ first two novels, Bandwidth and Borderless (which Peper discussed on the New Books Network last fall.) By the end of Borderless, Commonwealth, which controls the near-future version of the internet, has become its own sovereign entity, one whose ownership of the “feed” has given it enough soft power to force nations—through a clause in its terms of service—to implement an international carbon tax.Breach opens 10 years later. By this point, Commonwealth has instituted open borders and replaced national currencies with “feed credits” (if that sounds implausible, see Facebook’s recently unveiled plans to create its own digital currency, Libra). Commonwealth is now considering implementing something that one of the company’s loudest critics, billionaire Lowell Harding, is willing to kill to prevent: progressive membership fees—essentially a wealth tax—that will charge users to access the feed in proportion to their net worth, with profits invested in infrastructure for the poor.Harding calls the plan “worse than the French Revolution” and “f**king Piketty on algorithmic steroids!”Peper brings back the characters from the first two books, giving a star turn to Emily Kim, a hacker turned MMA fighter who has gone into hiding after earlier misdeeds. Between suspenseful fight scenes, characters grapple with heady topics like economic inequality, corporate responsibility and national governance.There’s a message in Peper’s books for today’s internet giants. The companies “that have gained a lot of power in society,” Peper says, “need to look in the mirror and think about how they should actually be making decisions … that will actually result in a future that people want to live in for the long term not just for the next quarterly report.”Rob Wolf is the author of The Alternate Universe and The Escape. He worked for many years as a journalist, writing on a wide range of topics from science to justice reform, and now serves as director of communications for a think tank in New York City. Read his blog or follow him on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-fiction

44mins

4 Jul 2019

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Eliot Peper, "Breach" (47North, 2019)

New Books in Literature

The massive corporation at the center of Eliot Peper’s Analog trilogy, which he completed last month with the publication of Breach (47North, 2019) is radically different from most science fictional companies. It aspires to do good.The growth of Commonwealth into a benevolent behemoth is chronicled in the series’ first two novels, Bandwidth and Borderless (which Peper discussed on the New Books Network last fall.) By the end of Borderless, Commonwealth, which controls the near-future version of the internet, has become its own sovereign entity, one whose ownership of the “feed” has given it enough soft power to force nations—through a clause in its terms of service—to implement an international carbon tax.Breach opens 10 years later. By this point, Commonwealth has instituted open borders and replaced national currencies with “feed credits” (if that sounds implausible, see Facebook’s recently unveiled plans to create its own digital currency, Libra). Commonwealth is now considering implementing something that one of the company’s loudest critics, billionaire Lowell Harding, is willing to kill to prevent: progressive membership fees—essentially a wealth tax—that will charge users to access the feed in proportion to their net worth, with profits invested in infrastructure for the poor.Harding calls the plan “worse than the French Revolution” and “f**king Piketty on algorithmic steroids!”Peper brings back the characters from the first two books, giving a star turn to Emily Kim, a hacker turned MMA fighter who has gone into hiding after earlier misdeeds. Between suspenseful fight scenes, characters grapple with heady topics like economic inequality, corporate responsibility and national governance.There’s a message in Peper’s books for today’s internet giants. The companies “that have gained a lot of power in society,” Peper says, “need to look in the mirror and think about how they should actually be making decisions … that will actually result in a future that people want to live in for the long term not just for the next quarterly report.”Rob Wolf is the author of The Alternate Universe and The Escape. He worked for many years as a journalist, writing on a wide range of topics from science to justice reform, and now serves as director of communications for a think tank in New York City. Read his blog or follow him on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

44mins

4 Jul 2019

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115 - Eliot Peper on The History of Technology and The Future of Society

FUTURE FOSSILS

Eliot Peper (Episode 47) is back on the show this week to talk about the themes around and within his Analog trilogy of very adjacent and believable sci fi novels (Bandwidth, Borderless, and the new “conclusion” Breach): that is, about the complex interactions between people and technology, both the layer cake of deep utilities we take for granted and the new affordances that disruptive tools produce – and how we shape our lives within them.https://www.eliotpeper.com/“One of the most fun things for me as a novelist about writing fiction is that it is very much about the questions, rather than the answers…if the answer’s obvious, I don’t need to write a book about it.”“You can’t really tell history without the history of technology.”“Congress writes laws about what’s going on, not what might be going on ten years from now. Policymaking is largely a reactionary measure.”“We haven’t figured out the new societies we want to build, given the new realities we’ve already invented.”“If you start thinking about the entire internet as an AI, then Google is not a company that is building what could be in the future some kind of AI program. Rather, Google and its status as a corporation, all of the corporate hierarchies that exist within it, and all of the people working on teams there, are actually just one part of that AI.”“I’m not a big believer in unitary self as an idea. I think we are all made up of MANY selves. We have these competing elements within us, and part of what it means to be human is to stitch these together into a coherent narrative. And we do that on the fly all the time.”“Your solution is going to create new problems, and the best way to best way to deal with that knowingly is to try to keep an open mind, try to maintain your beginner’s mind, maintain your state of awareness about the world and continually challenge your own assumptions.”“We are living in an age of acceleration – and yet, we have ALWAYS been confronted by a universe that defies our limited ability to make sense of it.”“My hope is that by using it like reasonable, mutually respectful people, we can turn the digital world into a place that is still gonna have some of the nasty stuff, but is gonna have a lot of the good stuff.”Mentioned: Kevin Kelly, Geoffrey West, Douglas RushkoffTheme Music: “God Detector” by Evan “Skytree” Snyder (feat. Michael Garfield)https://skytree.bandcamp.com/track/god-detector-ft-michael-garfieldAdditional Music: “On Higher Ground” by Michael Garfieldhttps://michaelgarfield.bandcamp.com/track/on-higher-groundSupport this show on Patreon to join the book club and for secret episodes:https://patreon.com/michaelgarfield Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/futurefossils. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

58mins

6 Jun 2019

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Addendum 2: The Human Element (with Eliot Peper)

Bestseller: A Self-Publishing Podcast by Reedsy

What is the best way to market a book in the Internet age? Technology may have changed, but the answer hasn't -- for over 2,000 years.

37mins

19 Mar 2019

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