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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Brian Leiter. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Brian Leiter, often where they are interviewed.

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Brian Leiter. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Brian Leiter, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Episode 103: Brian Leiter explains why we should think about Marx

Elucidations
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In this episode, we talk to Brian Leiter about why the writings of Karl Marx are helpful for understanding the current situation of the working and middle class in America, the 2016 Presidential election, and related topics!

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Jan 09 2018

50mins

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The Gospel According to Hobby Lobby--With Brian Leiter

Point of Inquiry
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To discuss last week's Supreme Court decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, Point of Inquiry welcomes Dr. Brian Leiter, law professor and philosopher at the University of Chicago. He's the author of several books including Why Tolerate Religion?. He blogs at Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog

Leiter and host Lindsay Beyerstein discuss what the Hobby Lobby decision means for women's health, corporate personhood, and the separation of church and state. 

In 2013, Leiter headlined a daylong symposium with the Center for Inquiry (the organization that produces Point of Inquiry), and you can watch the video here.  

Jul 07 2014

38mins

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Brian Leiter, "Why Tolerate Religion?"

The University of Chicago Law School Faculty Podcast
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Is there a principled reason why religious obligations that conflict with the law are accorded special toleration while other obligations of conscience are not? In Why Tolerate Religion? (Princeton, 2013), Professor Leiter argues there are no good reasons for doing so, that the reasons for tolerating religion are not specific to religion but apply to all claims of conscience. He also argues that a government committed to liberty of conscience is not required by the principal of toleration to grant burden-shifting exemptions to laws that promote the general welfare.

Brian Leiter is Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence and Director, Center for Law, Philosophy, and Human Values at the University of Chicago Law School.

This talk was recorded on November 19, 2013, as part of the Chicago's Best Ideas lecture series.

Feb 20 2014

57mins

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Brian Leiter - Epes Lecture

Campus Lectures, Interviews and Talks
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The Hansford M. Epes Distinguished Lecture Series is delighted to welcome University of Chicago Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence, Director of Law, Philosophy & Human Values Brian Leiter. Leiter will present "The Truth is Terrible: Nietzsche's Idea of an Aesthetic Justification for Existence."

Nov 06 2013

1hr 24mins

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Guest: Brian Leiter

Freethought Radio
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"Why Tolerate Religion?"Guest Brian Leiter

What is the afterlife to a fish? To answer that question, we play the debut of Dan Barker's new song, "Heaven," setting to music the poetry of Rupert Brooke. State/church entanglements in Alabama and Texas are in the news. Then we talk with University of Chicago Law Professor Brian Leiter, author of the new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

- See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.lR5x7Uh9.dpuf

"Why Tolerate Religion?"Guest Brian Leiter

What is the afterlife to a fish? To answer that question, we play the debut of Dan Barker's new song, "Heaven," setting to music the poetry of Rupert Brooke. State/church entanglements in Alabama and Texas are in the news. Then we talk with University of Chicago Law Professor Brian Leiter, author of the new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

- See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.lR5x7Uh9.dpuf

"Why Tolerate Religion?"Guest Brian Leiter

What is the afterlife to a fish? To answer that question, we play the debut of Dan Barker's new song, "Heaven," setting to music the poetry of Rupert Brooke. State/church entanglements in Alabama and Texas are in the news. Then we talk with University of Chicago Law Professor Brian Leiter, author of the new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

- See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.lR5x7Uh9.dpuf

"Why Tolerate Religion?"Guest Brian Leiter

What is the afterlife to a fish? To answer that question, we play the debut of Dan Barker's new song, "Heaven," setting to music the poetry of Rupert Brooke. State/church entanglements in Alabama and Texas are in the news. Then we talk with University of Chicago Law Professor Brian Leiter, author of the new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

- See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.lR5x7Uh9.dpuf

"Why Tolerate Religion?"Guest Brian Leiter

What is the afterlife to a fish? To answer that question, we play the debut of Dan Barker's new song, "Heaven," setting to music the poetry of Rupert Brooke. State/church entanglements in Alabama and Texas are in the news. Then we talk with University of Chicago Law Professor Brian Leiter, author of the new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

- See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.lR5x7Uh9.dpuf

"Why Tolerate Religion?"Guest Brian Leiter

What is the afterlife to a fish? To answer that question, we play the debut of Dan Barker's new song, "Heaven," setting to music the poetry of Rupert Brooke. State/church entanglements in Alabama and Texas are in the news. Then we talk with University of Chicago Law Professor Brian Leiter, author of the new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

- See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.lR5x7Uh9.dpuf

"Why Tolerate Religion?"Guest Brian Leiter

What is the afterlife to a fish? To answer that question, we play the debut of Dan Barker's new song, "Heaven," setting to music the poetry of Rupert Brooke. State/church entanglements in Alabama and Texas are in the news. Then we talk with University of Chicago Law Professor Brian Leiter, author of the new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

- See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.lR5x7Uh9.dpuf

"Why Tolerate Religion?"Guest Brian Leiter

What is the afterlife to a fish? To answer that question, we play the debut of Dan Barker's new song, "Heaven," setting to music the poetry of Rupert Brooke. State/church entanglements in Alabama and Texas are in the news. Then we talk with University of Chicago Law Professor Brian Leiter, author of the new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

- See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.lR5x7Uh9.dpuf

Aug 05 2013

42mins

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Brian Leiter, “Why Tolerate Religion?” (Princeton UP, 2013)

New Books in Religion
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Religious conviction enjoys a privileged status in our society.This is perhaps most apparent in legal contexts, where religious conviction is often given special consideration. To be more precise, religious conscience is recognized as a legitimate basis for exemption from standing laws, whereas claims of conscience deriving from non-religious commitments generally are not. Why is this? Is there something special about religiously-based claims of conscience? Is there something special about religion such that it gives rise to claims of conscience that deserve special consideration? If so, what?


In his new book, Why Tolerate Religion? (Princeton University Press, 2013) Brian Leiter offers subtle analyses of toleration, conscience, and respect. He argues that religion is indeed to be tolerated, because liberty of conscience is a central moral and political ideal. However, he holds that there’s nothing special about religion that gives special moral or legal weight to the demands it places on the consciences of believers. Contending that all claims of conscience–religious and non-religious–deserve toleration, Leiter argues that legal exemption may be granted on the basis of a claim of conscience–religious or otherwise–only when doing so does not place additional burdens on the non-exempt.

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Jan 03 2013

1hr 7mins

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Brian Leiter, “Why Tolerate Religion?” (Princeton UP, 2013)

New Books in Philosophy
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Religious conviction enjoys a privileged status in our society.This is perhaps most apparent in legal contexts, where religious conviction is often given special consideration. To be more precise, religious conscience is recognized as a legitimate basis for exemption from standing laws, whereas claims of conscience deriving from non-religious commitments generally are not. Why is this? Is there something special about religiously-based claims of conscience? Is there something special about religion such that it gives rise to claims of conscience that deserve special consideration? If so, what?


In his new book, Why Tolerate Religion? (Princeton University Press, 2013) Brian Leiter offers subtle analyses of toleration, conscience, and respect. He argues that religion is indeed to be tolerated, because liberty of conscience is a central moral and political ideal. However, he holds that there’s nothing special about religion that gives special moral or legal weight to the demands it places on the consciences of believers. Contending that all claims of conscience–religious and non-religious–deserve toleration, Leiter argues that legal exemption may be granted on the basis of a claim of conscience–religious or otherwise–only when doing so does not place additional burdens on the non-exempt.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jan 03 2013

1hr 7mins

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Episode 15: Brian Leiter discusses religious toleration

Elucidations
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In this episode, Brian Leiter considers whether claims of religious conscience--as opposed to claims of other matters of conscience--should be given special status under the law.

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Sep 08 2010

36mins

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Episode 3: Brian Leiter discusses Nietzsche on morality

Elucidations
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In this episode, Brian Leiter discusses Nietzsche's critique of morality and his naturalist approach to human psychology.

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Sep 01 2009

30mins

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