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Robin Dunbar Podcasts

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Robin Dunbar. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Robin Dunbar, often where they are interviewed.

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Robin Dunbar. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Robin Dunbar, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Episode 100: Dr. Danilo Bzdok & Dr. Robin Dunbar

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One of the most pervasive recommendations these days centers on the benefits related to socially distancing ourselves from others. And while this may be a meaningful recommendation, an unfortunate consequence seems to be increasing social isolation.

Social isolation begets loneliness, and loneliness is pervasive in modern society. Research reveals profound relationships between levels of loneliness and risk for various health conditions. Important for our current experience with COVID-19 is the relationship between social isolation and immune dysfunction.

In today’s podcast, we interview Dr. Danilo Bzdok and Dr. Robin Dunbar, who authored a new review entitled The Neurobiology of Social Distance. It’s a fascinating exploration of the importance of our social integration and our maintenance of social capital.

Here is the abstract from this publication:

"Never before have we experienced social isolation on such a massive scale as we have in response to COVID-19. Yet we know that the social environment has a dramatic impact on our sense of life satisfaction and well-being. In times of distress, crisis, or disaster, human resilience depends on the richness and strength of social connections, as well as active engagement in groups and communities. Over recent years, evidence emerging from various disciplines has made it abundantly clear: loneliness may be the most potent threat to survival and longevity. Here, we highlight the benefits of social bonds, choreographies of bond creation and maintenance, as well as the neurocognitive basis of social isolation and its deep consequences for mental and physical health."

This podcast is very special for us because this is the 100th episode of the The Empowering Neurologist, we are joined by Dr. Austin Perlmutter, and this is a fundamentally important topic that we get to explore with two of the most highly respected researchers in this field on the planet. Enjoy.

Jul 19 2020 · 58mins
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What makes us human? | Robin Dunbar (Emeritus Professor of Evolutionary Psychology | Magdalen College, Oxford University)

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What makes us human? — Being human in a digital context Robin Dunbar (Emeritus Professor of Evolutionary Psychology | Magdalen College, Oxford University) In this first episode, Tracey Camilleri talks to Prof Robin Dunbar of ‘Dunbar number’ *fame. He is Emeritus Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at Magdalen College, Oxford University. Robin brings his years of research and discovery about what make us human and how these insights can help leaders make better ‘human-shaped’ decisions. The conversations ranges across topics from the importance of triggering the endorphin system – through mechanisms such as laughter - and its positive effect on productivity, to more pragmatic advice on how leaders can better facilitate virtual meetings and maintain the ‘musical flow’ of conversation to arrive at more satisfaction and connection for their teams. * Dunbar's number (150) is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships — relationships in which an individual knows who each person is and how each person relates to every other person.


Learn more about Robin Dunbar https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Dunbar

Music : Dan Phillipson | Out in Front


Visit the Thompson Harrison website https://www.thompsonharrison.com/

Connect with Tracey Camilleri on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/tracey-camilleri-20694ab/

Connect with Sam Rockey on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/samanthajrockey/


When you're ready to #BeHeard, contact the podcast specialists at SolidGold.co.za

Apr 30 2020 · 25mins
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Philematology (KISSING) with Robin Dunbar

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Why do we kiss? What makes a good kiss or a bad kiss? How many microbes do we exchange? Is it good for us? One of the world’s most accomplished researchers on kissing, social behavior and relationships, Dr . Robin Dunar of Oxford University reluctantly agrees to be interviewed and explains how kissing may have evolved, how discos are research labs and friends are people you can invite yourself to have a beer with. Also: how to deal with the loneliness of isolation, autism and intimacy, why your cheerfulness may impact people you don’t even know and … Alie’s first kiss. 

Dr. Dunbar’s books are available here

A donation went to: www.alaseniorliving.org

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Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris

Theme song by Nick Thorburn

Support the show: http://Patreon.com/ologies

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Apr 07 2020 · 1hr 6mins
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ROBIN DUNBAR - How our Ancient Brains cope with Modern Society

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My guest on today's episode is Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at Oxford University Robin Dunbar

With the modern world having such an impact on our mental health and relationships, many are now asking whether human beings are in fact designed to thrive in the environment of large scale societies. Robin Dunbar has spent decades studying this and many other aspects of how primates and human beings have evolved and adapted.

I find out from Robin the effect that large scale societies have had on individuals and the negative result of being anonymous, the different way that men and women interact, and the importance of developing close relationships within your own community for your own longevity.

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Apr 06 2020 · 1hr 21mins
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Robin Dunbar

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Maintaining friendships is one of the most cognitively demanding things we do, according to Professor of Evolutionary Psychology Robin Dunbar. So why do we bother?

Robin has spent his life trying to answer this deceptively simple question. For most of his twenties, he lived with a herd of five hundred gelada monkeys in the Ethiopian highlands. He studied their social behaviour and concluded that an ability to get on with each other was just as important as finding food, for the survival of the species. Animals that live in large groups are less likely to get eaten by predators. When funding for animal studies dried up in the 1980s, he turned his attention to humans. and discovered there’s an upper limit to the number of real friends we can have, both in the real world and on social media.
Nov 25 2019 · 26mins
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Robin Dunbar on why we have friends

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Maintaining friendships is one of the most cognitively demanding things we do, according to Professor of Evolutionary Psychology Robin Dunbar. So why do we bother? Robin has spent his life trying to answer this deceptively simple question. For most of his twenties, he lived with a herd of five hundred gelada monkeys in the Ethiopian highlands. He studied their social behaviour and concluded that an ability to get on with each other was just as important as finding food, for the survival of the species. Animals that live in large groups are less likely to get eaten by predators. When funding for animal studies dried up in the 1980s, he turned his attention to humans. and discovered there’s an upper limit to the number of real friends we can have, both in the real world and on social media.
Producer: Anna Buckley
Jul 23 2019 · 27mins
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Evolutionary psychology, Professor Robin Dunbar, Oxford – WOAE031

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World renowned professor of evolutionary psychology, Robin Dunbar, explains his famous theory of social group size which suggests there is a limited number of relationships that humans (and other primates) can maintain. We also discuss some of his other findings related to social bonding and the release of endorphins activated by laughing, singing, and dancing together. Professor Dunbar is with the Department of Experimental Psychology at Oxford University and he’s a Fellow of Magdalen College.

https://mechrissyg.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/woae031-robin-dunbar.mp3

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Mar 31 2017 ·
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What Does Research Say About Social Bonding? Featuring Dr. Robin Dunbar.

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Dr.Robin Dunbar earned his PhD at Bristol University, before going to Cambridge to complete an Advanced Research Fellowship. He has held research and teaching posts at Stockholm University, University College London, and Liverpool University before returning to Oxford in 2007. Dr.Dunbar's research seeks to understand the mechanisms that foster social bonding in primates and humans.

Learn more about author and host, Sarah Raymond Cunningham, at sarahcunningham.org

Mar 14 2017 · 26mins
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(32 mins) Robin Dunbar: The Science of Love and Betrayal

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THE FABER PODCAST

From the frontline of cutting-edge scientific research, Professor Robin Dunbar’s new book ‘The Science of Love and Betrayal’ is a brilliant and sparkling exploration of the extraordinary nature of romantic love. The book tackles some of the most fundamental questions of human behaviour, including – why do we as a species pairbond when few other mammals do? What are the evolutionary advantages of monogamy over promiscuity? And much more.

https://curatedaudio.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/robin-dunbar_-the-science-of-love-and-betrayal.mp3
Oct 13 2013 ·