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Tom Wescott

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Latest 9 Oct 2021 | Updated Daily

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Episode 78 : The Great Tom Wescott: Ripperologist, Writer, and One Hell of a Talker!!

Transatlantic History Ramblings

INTERVIEW BEGINS AT: 20:20 In the world of Ripperology Tom Wescott may be among the true greats. His book The Bank Holiday Murders changed how any life long Ripperologists rethink the case...an almost impossible task , His follow up Ripper Confidential was the most anticipated Ripper release in years! We are thrilled to be joined by the one and only Tom Wescott to discuss his books, his upcoming work and some other ramblings.. Tom is one of a kind and I for one would read ANYTHING he decided to write So kick back, enjoy and please rate and share the show..let's keep the audience growing. Thank you all And hey, check out our Merch Store for Shirts. Hoodies, Coffee Mugs, Stickers, Magnets and a whole host of other items https://www.teepublic.com/user/tahistory All of our episodes are listed as explicit due to language and some topics, such as historical crime, that may not be suitable for all listeners.-Opening and closing theme is Random Sanity by British composer DeeZee

2hr 4mins

28 Apr 2021

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TOM WESCOTT - RIPPER CONFIDENTIAL

House of Mystery Radio on NBC

WINNER Best Book of 2017 - Original Jack the Ripper Best Of AwardsFrom the author of The Bank Holiday Murders: The True Story of the First Whitechapel MurdersGroundbreaking history and exciting investigative journalism combine in a work jam-packed with newly unearthed finds and fresh insights that pull us deeper into the world of Jack the Ripper and closer to the man himself. Wescott does not promote a suspect but instead comprehensively investigates the murders of Polly Nichols and Elizabeth Stride, bringing to light new medical evidence, crucial new material on important witnesses, and – revealed for the first time – the name of a woman who may have met Jack the Ripper and survived to tell the tale. Also discussed in this book: Charles Lechmere, recently named as a suspect in the Jack the Ripper documentary, Conspiracy: The Missing Evidence, is restored to his proper place in history as an innocent witness. Walter Sickert, the subject of Patricia Cornwell’s Jack the Ripper books, was not the Ripper, but is revealed here to have been only one of several artists and poets who may have been acquainted with victim Mary Kelly. Bruce Robinson’s Jack the Ripper book, They All Love Jack, controversially endorsed the myth that fruiterer Matthew Packer sold grapes to Liz Stride which were later found on her hand. Around this was constructed an intricate police conspiracy. In Ripper Confidential the truth is exposed and these events are proved beyond doubt to have never taken place. Was Elizabeth Stride a Ripper victim? For the first time, all the myths are cleared away and the facts are looked at in great detail. The contemporary investigators speak out from the past and tell us what they thought of one of the Ripper’s most enigmatic and controversial clues – the chalk-written message on the wall in Goulston Street. Did the Ripper write it and what might it actually have said? A comprehensive look is taken at Berner Street witness, Israel Schwartz. Why did he disappear within weeks from the written record? Was or was he not a legitimate witness? This and much more is discussed, and for the first time it’s revealed why he did not give evidence at the inquest, why the two best known versions of his story are inconsistent, and – most crucially – that he was not the last person to see Liz Stride with a man who was probably her killer. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/houseofmysteryradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

53mins

23 Feb 2020

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TOM WESCOTT - BANK HOLIDAY MURDERS

House of Mystery Radio on NBC

WINNER - Indie Reader Award for Best True Crime BookWINNER - Independent Publisher (IPPY) Bronze Medal Award for Best History Book 2014FINALIST - Indie Excellence Award for Best True Crime Book (second place)*Jack the Ripper stalked the streets of London’s East End from August through November of 1888 in what is dubbed the ‘Autumn of Terror’. However, the grisly ripping of Polly Nichols on August 31st was not the first unsolved murder of the year. The April murder of Emma Smith and the August murder of Martha Tabram both occurred on bank holidays. They baffled the police and press alike and were assumed by the original investigators to have been the first murders in the series. Were they correct? In this provocative work of literary archeology, author Tom Wescott places these early murders in their proper historical context and digs to unearth new evidence and hard facts not seen in over 125 years. The Bank Holiday Murders is the only book of its kind. It eschews the tired approach of unsatisfying ‘final solutions’ in favor of solid research, logical reasoning and new information. The clues followed are not drawn from imagination but from the actual police reports and press accounts of the time. The questions asked by Wescott are ones first suggested by the original investigators but lost to time until now. The answers provided are compelling and sometimes explosive. Among the revelations are:The true history of the 'Eddowes Shawl' or 'Ripper Shawl' discussed in the new book 'Naming Jack the Ripper' by Russell Edwards. New information linking the murders of Smith & Tabram to the same killer(s).Proof that the police did not believe key witnesses in either case. Proof that at least one of these witnesses was working with the murderer.New evidence connecting many of the victims that may lead to their actual slayers.Information on Emily Horsnell, the ACTUAL first Whitechapel murder victim.The hidden truth of ‘Leather Apron’ and its role in unraveling the Ripper mystery.Proof of a corrupt police sergeant who thwarted the investigation. Was he protecting the Ripper?Much more.The Bank Holiday Murders: The True Story of the First Whitechapel Murders brings us closer than ever to the actual truth behind the Jack the Ripper story and is sure to appeal to fans of Paul Begg, Stewart P. Evans, Philip Sugden, Donald Rumbelow, Ann Rule, Patricia Cornwell (Chasing the Ripper) as well as readers of Victorian true crime, true life mysteries and historical cold cases in generaSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/houseofmysteryradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1hr 12mins

23 Feb 2020

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Jack the Ripper: New Clues & Theories w/ Tom Wescott - A True Crime History Podcast

Most Notorious! A True Crime History Podcast

One of the world's most preeminent Ripperologists, Tom Wescott, author of "The Bank Holiday Murders" and "Ripper Confidential" is my guest on this week's episode of Most Notorious.His extensive research into Jack the Ripper/Whitechapel murders give his a unique perspective into this truly iconic true crime cold case. Focusing on some of the more intriguing peripheral players in the events, including a suspicious prostitute named "Pearly Poll", he offers a fresh take and new theories on who might have murdered the "Canonical Five" (and likely more) in Victorian-era London.Become a Most Notorious patron at: www.patreon.com/mostnotoriousLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr 8mins

21 Nov 2019

Most Popular

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RIPPER CONFIDENTIAL -- TOM WESCOTT IS OUR SPECIAL GUEST AUTHOR

True Crime Uncensored with Burl Barer & Mark Boyer

Groundbreaking history and exciting investigative journalism combine in a work jam-packed with newly unearthed finds and fresh insights that pull us deeper into the world of Jack the Ripper and closer to the man himself. Wescott does not promote a suspect but instead comprehensively investigates the murders of Polly Nichols and Elizabeth Stride, bringing to light new medical evidence, crucial new material on important witnesses, and – revealed for the first time – the name of a woman who may have met Jack the Ripper and survived to tell the tale. Also discussed in this book: Charles Lechmere, recently named as a suspect in the Jack the Ripper documentary, Conspiracy: The Missing Evidence, is restored to his proper place in history as an innocent witness.

54mins

5 Oct 2018

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Ripper Confidential Part 2 with Tom Wescott: The Murder of Elizabeth Stride

Rippercast- Your Podcast on the Jack the Ripper murders

Rippercast is please to bring to you Part 2 of our interview with Tom Wescott, author of Ripper Confidential: New Research on the Whitechapel Murders.In this episode Tom Wescott discusses the murder of Elizabeth Stride.

1hr 25mins

27 Aug 2017

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East End Conference 2017- Tom Wescott: Reading Between the Lines

Rippercast- Your Podcast on the Jack the Ripper murders

Rippercast is pleased to bring to you presentations from the 2017 East End Conference which took place in the East End of London over the 5th and 6th of August, 2017.Tom Wescott: Reading Between the LinesAuthor of 'The Bank Holiday Murders' and 'Ripper Confidential'. Podcast artwork by Andrew Firth

34mins

8 Aug 2017

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Ripper Confidential: One on one with Tom Wescott- Part 1

Rippercast- Your Podcast on the Jack the Ripper murders

Rippercast is pleased to welcome back author Tom Wescott to discuss his new book 'Ripper Confidential: New Research on the Whitechapel Murders'. In this episode we discuss the murder of Mary Ann Nichols on the 31st of August, 1888. Part one of a two part interview.

1hr 3mins

9 May 2017

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THE BANK HOLIDAY MURDERS-Tom Wescott

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers

Jack the Ripper stalked the streets of London’s East End from August through November of 1888 in what is dubbed the ‘Autumn of Terror’. However, the grisly ripping of Polly Nichols on August 31st was not the first unsolved murder of the year. The April murder of Emma Smith and the August murder of Martha Tabram both occurred on bank holidays. They baffled the police and press alike and were assumed by the original investigators to have been the first murders in the series. Where they correct? In this provocative work of literary archeology, author Tom Wescott places these early murders in their proper historical context and digs to unearth new evidence and hard facts not seen in over 125 years. The Bank Holiday Murders is the only book of its kind. It eschews the tired approach of unsatisfying ‘final solutions’ in favor of solid research, logical reasoning and new information. The clues followed are not drawn from imagination but from the actual police reports and press accounts of the time. The questions asked by Wescott are ones first suggested by the original investigators but lost to time until now. The answers provided are compelling and sometimes explosive. Among the revelations are: • New information linking the murders of Smith & Tabram to the same killer(s). • Proof that the police did not believe key witnesses in either case. • Proof that at least one of these witnesses was working with the murderer. • New evidence connecting many of the victims that may lead to their actual slayers. • Information on Emily Horsnell, the ACTUAL first Whitechapel murder victim. • The hidden truth of ‘Leather Apron’ and its role in unraveling the Ripper mystery. • Proof of a corrupt police sergeant who thwarted the investigation. Was he protecting the Ripper? THE BANK HOLIDAY MURDERS: The True Story of the First Whitechapel Murders-Tom Wescott.

1hr 30mins

26 Mar 2015

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The Bank Holiday Murders: One on one with Tom Wescott

Rippercast- Your Podcast on the Jack the Ripper murders

Rippercast welcomes researcher and author Tom Wescott to the show for an in depth discussion of his book 'The Bank Holiday Murders-The True Story of the First Whitechapel Murders'. He details his over-decade long history in researching the Whitechapel Murders; the books, authors and researchers who have most influenced him in his study of the case; and addresses what he believes is the current state of Ripperology and what we can look forward to from him as he continues to write about the personages who populated East London in 1888.

2hr 46mins

30 Mar 2014