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Neal Spackman Podcasts

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8 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Neal Spackman. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Neal Spackman, often where they are interviewed.

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8 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Neal Spackman. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Neal Spackman, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Planetary Regeneration Podcast | Episode 9: Neal Spackman

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Planetary Regeneration Podcast | Episode 9: Neal Spackman by Gregory Landua
Jan 16 2020 · 1hr 23mins
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Even the driest deserts can be regenerated. Here’s how! With Neal Spackman of the Al Baydha project: 141

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I had the pleasure of catching up again with Neal Spackman, one of the primary designers and organizers of the Al Baydha project in Saudi Arabia.
The Al Baydha project began in 2009 with a long list of lofty ambitions. Among them they aimed to improve the local economy, act as a model for sustainable development in the Arabian Peninsula, reduce dependence on government handouts for the community, and store and harvest rainwater in the landscape through the restoration of the savannah ecosystem which had been desertified in only a few decades. This is the second interview I’ve done with Neal on his work in Saudi Arabia and this time around we got to go in even greater depth on the details and context of the project that informed the design and decision making process. If you’re interested in dryland and desert regeneration, I highly recommend taking the time to listen to the first episode, even though this one stands well on its own.
This time around, we revisit the history of the region and how government policies had major impacts on the lives of the nomadic bedouin people and in turn their relationship with the ecology of Al Baydha. Neal walks me through the planning and design process that preceded the work and how the cultural context of the project played a big role in setting the goals for a more sustainable economy for the area. We also dig into the biggest takeaways from 10 years of the largest desert regeneration attempt yet made in Saudi Arabia.
From there Neal even gets into his new projects and how his return to academia has informed a new approach to degraded land restoration as well as how farming can be leveraged as an ecological asset. Neal makes a lot of great recommendations toward the end for resources including books and videos that helped to inspire and inform these ambitious projects, so be sure to check out the resources section under this episode on the website.
Resources:
More information in the Al Baydha Project from Wikipedia
Sustainable Design Masterclass YouTube channel
The Climate Analog Tool by Andrew Millison
Cradle to Cradle. Book link
The Negev: Challenges of a desert book
Natural Capitalism Book
Restoration Agriculture
Regenerative Agriculture
Dec 06 2019 · 53mins

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Desert regeneration and showcasing examples of permaculture success with Neal Spackman of the Al Baydah project and Sustainable Design Masterclass: 020

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My guest today is Neal Spackman, Neal is best known for his work on the Al Baydah project in Saudi Arabia, and as the co-founder of the Sustainable Design Masterclass. Neal has been working for nearly a decade in one of the most arid regions of the world in a severely desertified region of saudi arabia to regenerate the landscape there through permaculture methods focusing on water harvesting techniques. As a former student of Geoff Lawton, Neal began work on the project with no prior experience with either permaculture or dryland restoration, but in a remarkably short time he and his team have completely transformed the way the land both sequesters water and builds topsoil, and has even reached the point where the trees no longer need any water from drip irrigation in a desert that receives only a few centimeters of rainfall a year.
In this interview Neal talks in detail about the intricacies and challenges that they face on his land restoration project, the social and economic factors that add a human element to the designs, and how he went from a complete beginner to running one of the most prominent and successful desert restoration projects in the world.
We also talk about the incredible information and interviews that he hosts through the Sustainable Design Masterclass and the inspirational stories of people who are running profitable businesses by regenerating the earth.
Resources:
http://www.albaydha.org/ https://www.sustainabledesignmasterclass.com/
Jun 09 2017 · 1hr 1min
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Episode 002 - Neal Spackman: How to Make it Rain in the Desert

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SUBSCRIBE: WWW.EARTHREPAIRRADIO.COM
In this episode I sit down with the near legendary Neal Spackman.
Neal talks about his work on large scale reforestation on the Arabian Peninsula with the Al Baydha project, and how to increase rainfall using in desert environments. The Al Baydha project lies in an area receiving 0-2 inches of rainfall annually. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia brought Neal in to help establish a productive Permaculture system in this hyper-arid environment in an effort to settle nomadic Bedouin populations in an economically and ecologically sustainable way.

Neal's Links:
http://www.sustainabledesignmasterclass.com/the-sustainable-design-masterclass http://www.twovisionspermaculture.com/ https://permacultureglobal.org/users/1234-neal-spackman http://www.albaydha.org/

More on Al Baydha:
Al Baydha is a 700 square kilometer area approximately 40 kilometers south of Makkah, with a settled population of nearly 5000 inhabitants. Citizens of Al Baydha face an impending collapse of their culture and way of life due to an imbalance between themselves and their environment. Economically, their two main activities are animal husbandry and cutting wood to be sold in Makkah, both of which depend entirely on the local ecology. Between their animals’ grazing and the woodcutting, Al Baydha has experienced large-scale degradation and rapid deforestation.

1. Deforestation

The deforestation has progressed enough that now the people must supplement their animals’ feed with imported barley and hay. As the deforestation continues, there will come a turning point where they can no longer afford to keep their flocks, and then they will have to move to the cities to seek work. If this happens, over the next two or three generations the local heritage will be lost.

Further, deforestation exacerbates the deadly floods of the rainy season, and leads to the loss of fertile desert soil through erosion.

2. Harvesting Water

The Al Baydha Project is implementing an alternative economic system that preserves the people’s heritage, enables them to stay on their land, and reestablishes balance between them and their environment. Moreover the people are being taught every aspect of the system so they can be self sufficient and continue once the project is over.

The foundation of the Al Baydha Project is a water system that uses low-tech earthworks to change flash floods into rivers. This system replenishes aquifers, enables desert agriculture, and eliminates the damage caused by flash floods to human and animal life, as well as to infrastructure. Because its main components are earthworks, the water system is simple to learn, and requires only the cost of labor, some machinery work for moving heavy rocks, and 3-5 years of irrigation. If correctly implemented the system can last for hundreds of years.

3. Desert Agriculture

The agricultural system of the Al Baydha Project builds on the water system to establish food forests that provide forage for the people’s flocks, as well as fruit, fuel, timber, honey, meat, medicine, herbs, mulch, and shade for the people. Rather than planting one or two crops, the project will plant entire ecosystems that can thrive without human intervention, but in which every plant is beneficial to people.
Feb 28 2017 · 59mins

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TSH - 110 - Supercast - Neal Spackman, Grant Schultz

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On this episode of The Sample Hour, I am joined by "The Mad Scientist of Permaculture" Mr Grant Schultz and Neal Spackman. I had a lot of fun talking to these two gentleman. We cover a wide variety of topics, including starting adult pinewood derby leagues, operating inside the system and what each of us wants to accomplish this year. Be sure to follow Neal's work at the Al Baydha Project and to follow his project's instagram and Facebook accounts. Follow Grant's work at Versaland and subscribe to his youtube page as well. Save $100 off the Profitable Urban Farming Course by clicking
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May 03 2016 ·
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TSH - 105 - Greening The Desert - Neal Spackman

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On this episode of The Sample Hour, I am joined by Neal Spackman. I had a lot of fun picking Neal's brain on this podcast. Neal and I discuss his current work at the Al Baydha Project, failed UN projects, USAID, depleting aquifer systems and how we can implement Neal's work here.
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Mar 22 2016 ·
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Greening Saudi Arabia - Seeing Progress, Plant Species, Lessons Learned, and No Regrets, an Update with Neal Spackman (PVP116)

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Neal Spackman is regreening a portion of the desert that gets 3 inches of rain a year on average, but lately they aren’t even meeting the average. Greening the site by using true cost water accounting, meaning that they only use the equivalent of water that falls onto the site to establish the vegetation. With minimal rainfall, no pre-existing plant life and 100 plus degree summer temperatures, it is no easy task. Throw in the economic and social challenges of the village that he is working with and the task becomes even harder. But despite those challenges, progress is being made, and the sounds of crickets are now being heard. Life is coming back.

We heard his story originally in Episode 78, permaculturevoices.com/78, and today we get an update and find out how much life is coming back.

Learn more at permaculturevoices.com/116

Feb 19 2016 · 1hr 7mins
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078 - 100 Degrees and 3 Inches of Rain. Greening Saudi Arabia with Neal Spackman.

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This is an interview with Neal Spackman. And while you probably haven’t heard of Neal the work that Neal is doing to regreen an area of the Saudi Arabian desert is monumental. The work that he is doing is every bit as great as the work that Geoff Lawton has done. And I mean that. We are talking about regreening a portion of the desert that gets 3 inches of rain a year on average, but lately they aren’t even meeting the average. Greening the site by using true cost water accounting, meaning that they only use the equivalent of water that falls onto the site to establish the vegetation. With minimal rainfall, no pre-existing plant life and 100 plus degree summer temperatures, it is no easy task. Throw in the economic and social challenges of the village that he is working with and the task becomes even harder. But despite those challenges, progress is being made, and the sounds of crickets are now being heard. Life is coming back. The upside potential here is huge. And as Neal says, “"There was some real risk, but in the end I didn't think I was going to end off any worse than I was.... And the potential opportunity was exponentially greater than what I was doing at the time."

Show Notes: permaculturevoices.com/78

Oct 03 2014 · 1hr 45mins