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Noliwe Rooks

10 Podcast Episodes

Latest 17 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

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Noliwe Rooks on Interdisciplinary Scholarship

The Visible Voices

Professor, Dr, and Chair Noliwe Rooks is an interdisciplinary scholar, She is the chair of and a professor in Africana Studies at Brown University and the founding director of the Segrenomics Lab at the school. Her work explores how race and gender both impact and are impacted by popular culture, social history and political life in the United States. She works on the cultural and racial implications of beauty, fashion and adornment; race, capitalism and education, and the urban politics of food and cannabis production. Follow on Twitter: @nrookie Cutting School The Segrenomics of American Education (2017)Related articlesAfrican American Homeschools as Racial Protectionism The Rise of Homeschooling Among Black Families A revealing look at America’s most controversial charter school system. Success academy Mark Zuckerberg wanted to help Newark schools. Newarkers say they weren’t heard.Historical contextBrown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954) Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) Hair Raising: Beauty, Culture, and African American Women (1996)Related articleSoul Cap, designed for swimmers with natural Black hair, banned from Tokyo Olympics Soul Cap ShopBrown University, Department of Africana Studies Prof. Anani Dzidzienyo in the Brown Daily HeraldProf. Anani Dzidizenyo in the Brown Alumni Monthly

28mins

22 Jul 2021

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BvB@67 - Noliwe Rooks Revisited

The Integrated Schools Podcast

For the second episode in our Brown v. Board at 67: The Stories We Tell Ourselves series, we talk with Dr. Noliwe Rooks (Cornell). Her book, Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education, as well as some of her more recent research around the pushback to school desegregation from communities of color and the decimation of the Black teaching corps following Brown v. Board, provide context in which to understand the full range of outcomes from the court decision. While Dr. Rucker Johnson, in part 1, showed us some of the many benefits of desegregation, Dr. Rooks reminds us of many of the costs, especially to the Black community. She asks us to engage with these stories in order to understand the very real intent behind where we find ourselves today. It is only through changing the stories we tell, that we might envision a different, more equitable future for school integration.Register for the Integrated Schools Book Club in July.  We'll be reading Heather McGhee's The Sum of UsUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. Edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

38mins

11 May 2021

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Wildoak Living: Dr. Noliwe Rooks on Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education

KZYX Public Affairs

April 22, 2021--Johanna “Wildoak” talks with Dr. Noliwe Rooks, W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of Literature at Cornell University, about her most recent book Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education. Also, a look back at Earth Day 2021 from Earth Day 2031.

41mins

26 Apr 2021

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NYC School Closure Updates, and Interviews with Prof. Noliwe Rooks & William Doyle

Talk Out of School

Links and Resources:Noliwe Rooks, Cutting School: The Segrenomics of American EducationWilliam Doyle,  Let the Children Play: For the Learning, Well-being and Life Success of Every Child, co-authored by Pasi SahlbergSegment about Finnish schools in Michael Moore’s documentary, “Where to Invade Next”

55mins

14 Oct 2020

Most Popular

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Ep 19 - Segrenomics, Black Teachers, and Noliwe Rooks (BvB@65)

The Integrated Schools Podcast

For the second episode in our Brown v. Board at 65: The Stories We Tell Ourselves series, we talk with Dr. Noliwe Rooks(Cornell). Her book, Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education, as well as some of her more recent research around the pushback to school desegregation from communities of color and the decimation of the Black teaching corps following Brown v. Board, provide context in which to understand the full range of outcomes from Brown v Board.While Dr. Johnson, in Ep 18, showed us some of the many benefits of desegregation, Dr. Rooks reminds us of many of the costs, especially to the Black community. She asks us to engage with these stories in order to understand the very real intent behind where we find ourselves today. It is only through changing the stories we tell, that we might envision a different, more equitable future for school integration.Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Courtney Mykytyn. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

48mins

24 Apr 2019

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S1-E5: Cutting School, Listening to Communities (Noliwe Rooks)

The Radical Bureaucrat

The Radical Bureaucrat: Noliwe RooksAt the beginning of her most recent book, Dr. Noliwe Rooks shares a conversation she had over and over with her white, affluent students at Princeton. They called education “the civil rights issue of our time,” and seemed eager and committed to eradicating educational inequity. Rooks quickly noticed that for all their enthusiasm, few of her students had actually visited the underserved schools and neighborhoods they wanted to help or talked to the parents, students, and educators there. When Rooks brought up this type of engagement, they seemed dismissive of the idea that it was even necessary.In today’s conversation, Dr. Rooks shares how these repetitive conversations reflect broad rhetoric in the education reform movement and historical patterns in the racialized history of education in the U.S. She shares the concept of "segrenomics," economic and business models that require segregation to produce profits. She describes the great lengths that formerly-enslaved people in the rural south took to build schools in their communities, why white philanthropists took all the credit, and how similar patterns echo in today’s education politics. Rooks explores all the reasons why, if we ever hope to serve our most marginalized communities as bureaucrats, we need to engage meaningfully and continuously with community members who’ve been organizing, teaching, and fighting for education resources for decades.Further reading:· Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education by Noliwe M. Rooks. 2017. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34196066-cutting-school· Comparative and International Education Society https://www.cies.us/Referenced in this episode:· Waiting for “Superman,” David Guggenheim, 2010. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1566648/· Dangerous Minds, John N. Smith, 1995. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112792/· Stand and Deliver, Ramón Menéndez, 1988. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0094027/· Race to the Top: 2009 U.S. Department of Education initiative that awarded grants to education reform initiatives. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_to_the_Top· EduColor Collective: http://www.educolor.org/about/· Teach for America: https://www.teachforamerica.org/Show notes by Hannah E. Brown; “Aquarela” do Brasil by Ary Barroso, Performed by Peter Markowski, Luke Maurer, and Abram Guerra; Thanks to Chris Martinie for logo and all of you for your love and support.

59mins

16 Dec 2018

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Dr. Noliwe Rooks, pt. 2 (Ep. 4, 2018)

In Black America

In Black America producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr concludes a conversation with Dr. Noliwe Rooks, Director of American Studies and Associate Professor of African Studies at Cornell University and author of Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation and the End of Public Education.

29mins

31 Dec 2017

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Dr. Noliwe Rooks, pt. 1 (Ep. 3, 2018)

In Black America

In Black America producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr speaks with Dr. Noliwe Rooks, author of Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation and the End of Public Education, and Director of American Studies and Associate Professor of African Studies at Cornell University.

29mins

24 Dec 2017

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Noliwe Rooks on 'Segrenomics', Cutting School.... and the End of Public Education

ChatChat - Claudia Cragg

's speaks here with  about her new book which illustrates the ways that segregation, poverty, and race intertwine to affect America’s education landscape, Rooks () clearly and vigorously maps the systemic disadvantages imposed upon students of color and the poor. “The infrastructure, ideology, progress, and promises [of America’s schools] all fall more than a little short if the goal is equality,” Rooks argues. While the performance gap between students from poor schools and wealthy schools is widely reported, Rooks shows how reform efforts have “focused far less on the structure or system itself and more on the failures of those it is designed to educate.” By closely examining these federally supported and increasingly privatized initiatives over the past 30 years, Rooks finds both a growing racial divide in education and an increasingly lucrative sector of business. She introduces the term , which she defines as “the business of profiting from high levels of racial and economic segregation.” Pointing to the financial success of organizations such as (valued at $400 million dollars in 2016), Rooks questions who actually benefits from charter schools, voucher programs, and virtual schooling. She argues that reform must integrate those who are most often excluded from the process: teachers and members of disenfranchised communities themselves. Poignant and plainly stated, Rooks’s thorough narrative of socioeconomics urges greater criticism and thoughtfulness about education reform in the 21st century.

30mins

27 Nov 2017

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THE DR. VIBE SHOW - NOLIWE ROOKS - ARE BLACKS PREDISPOSED TO BE LESS HEALTHY THAN WHITES - JULY 5 - 2012.mp3

The Dr. Vibe Show

49mins

23 Jul 2012