OwlTail

Cover image of Vandana Singh

Vandana Singh

15 Podcast Episodes

Latest 24 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

Episode artwork

Ep 188: Sponsored Episode: Vandana Singh with Schneider Electric

Diverse: a SWE podcast

On this episode of Diverse, a SWE podcast, host Sam East sits down with Vandana Singh, Senior Vice President of Secure Power North America at Schneider Electric. Listen as they talk about Vandana's professional goals, her work with non-profits and how Schneider Electric has adapted as a majority of their employees have transitioned to working remotely.

35mins

13 Jul 2022

Episode artwork

A sci-fi story of Earth's renewal | Vandana Singh

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

"The world is a living tapestry ... As the weave of life is torn apart in one place, the threads unravel in another," says author and physics professor Vandana Singh, acknowledging humanity's interconnectedness with the planet -- and the uncertain future we face if we don't protect it. Reading an excerpt from her latest work of speculative fiction, Singh shares a hopeful vision for Earth's renewal.

9mins

8 Jun 2022

Similar People

Episode artwork

A sci-fi story of Earth's renewal | Vandana Singh

TED Talks Daily (HD video)

"The world is a living tapestry ... As the weave of life is torn apart in one place, the threads unravel in another," says author and physics professor Vandana Singh, acknowledging humanity's interconnectedness with the planet -- and the uncertain future we face if we don't protect it. Reading an excerpt from her latest work of speculative fiction, Singh shares a hopeful vision for Earth's renewal.

9mins

8 Jun 2022

Episode artwork

A sci-fi story of Earth's renewal | Vandana Singh

TED Talks Daily

"The world is a living tapestry ... As the weave of life is torn apart in one place, the threads unravel in another," says author and physics professor Vandana Singh, acknowledging humanity's interconnectedness with the planet -- and the uncertain future we face if we don't protect it. Reading an excerpt from her latest work of speculative fiction, Singh shares a hopeful vision for Earth's renewal.

9mins

8 Jun 2022

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Sunshine Saturday: Magical Success Story by Vandana Singh

Shangrila With ILA ANANT ACHARYA

In this Magical story by Vandana she shares her experience how LOA and the signature workshop by Mohit has helped her to become an Independent Girl who can travel to Shirdi Saibaba Mandir alone with approval from her family members.

5mins

20 Feb 2021

Episode artwork

The SF Universes of Vandana Singh

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge talk about the creative science in the short stories of Vandana Singh's collection "Ambiguity Machines" Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1hr 1min

13 Oct 2020

Episode artwork

Episode 499: Ten Minutes with Vandana Singh

The Coode Street Podcast

Ten minutes with... is a special series presented by Coode Street that sees readers and booklovers from around the world talk about what they're reading right now and what's getting them through these difficult times. Only recently back from several months in India, Vandana Singh joins Gary to talk about what experiencing lockdown was like near Delhi and the hardships of day workers suddenly laid off and walking long distances back to their villages, the challenges to a speculative fiction writer of unexpectedly living in a 'bad science fiction novel' and some of the comforts of reading poetry, a novel set in remote Nagaland, 'magical realism' in the stories of Gogu Shyamala, and even Harry Potter. Books mentioned include: Ambiguity Machines and Other Stories by Vandana Singh When the River Sleeps by Easterine Kire Father May Be an Elephant and Mother Only a Small Basket, But... by Gogu Shyamala

14mins

28 Aug 2020

Episode artwork

Of Love and Other Monsters by Vandana Singh

Umbrella Genre

originally published in 2007. Who are the monsters? The aliens? The humans? The ones we love? An exploration of gender and thought through the lens of alien beings and self discovery. This episode comes with a warning about discussion of sexual assault. We read through a scene in the text from 42:56 to 44:17 and discuss it further until 48:00. Listener discretion is advised.

53mins

2 Sep 2019

Episode artwork

Vandana Singh, "Ambiguity Machines and Other Stories" (Small Beer Press, 2018)

New Books in Science Fiction

Vandana Singh has made a career of studying both hard science and the far corners of creativity. It’s no surprise then that Ambiguity Machines and Other Stories (Small Beer Press, 2018), which was nominated for a Philip K. Dick Award, reflects a fluency in multiple languages—not just English and Hindi, but the idioms of both particle physics and fantastical narratives that reach far beyond what science can (as of yet, at least) describe.“One of the things that really bothers me about how we think about the world is that we split it up into all these different disciplines and fields that have impenetrable walls between them, and one of the reasons I love … writing science fiction is that it allows us to make those walls porous,” Singh says.A reader might think that an expert in both particle physics and climate science might hesitate to write stories that explore impossibilities like time travel or machines “that cannot exist because they violate the known laws of reality” (the subject of the collection’s eponymous tale). But Singh embraces paradox and the simple truth that there’s still much about the universe that we don’t understand.Scientists are supposed to be objective and “check their emotions at the door,” she says. But it “isn't that simple because, after all, the paradox is that we are a part of the universe, studying the universe. And so how can we claim full objectivity?” Singh feels the only way to be authentic is “to acknowledge who I am as a human, as this little splinter of the universe conversing with another little splinter of the universe.”Several of the stories’ characters are, like Singh, female scientists, and their struggles to be taken seriously reflect real-world conditions.“In the physical sciences, it's still pretty tough for women,” says Singh, an assistant professor of physics at Framingham State University. “We have plenty of gender issues in India but the assumption that women can't do as well or don’t have the ability … is not that strong or strident in India.” In the U.S., however, “the negative micro-messaging and sometimes macro-messaging I've come across has been ‘Well a woman, so what do you know?’ You’re automatically assumed to be more touchy-feely and … you must not be as good at science, which is utterly absurd.”For Singh, physics and storytelling are intrinsically linked. “The way that I think about physics is really influenced by the way I think about story, and they're different but they talk to each other,” she says. For instance, she’s used fiction “to explore concepts that help me also conceptualize climate science for the classroom and beyond, and think of or reframe different ways of thinking about climate change and what's happening to our world. … I guess one analogy I could make is binocular vision. I have two ways of seeing the world, and they talk to each other so you get more depth.”Rob Wolf is the author of The Khronos Chronicles. He worked for a decade as a journalist and now serves as director of communications at a non-profit dedicated to justice reform. Follow him on Twitter: @RobWolfBooks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-fiction

42mins

20 Jun 2019

Episode artwork

Vandana Singh, "Ambiguity Machines and Other Stories" (Small Beer Press, 2018)

New Books in Literature

Vandana Singh has made a career of studying both hard science and the far corners of creativity. It’s no surprise then that Ambiguity Machines and Other Stories (Small Beer Press, 2018), which was nominated for a Philip K. Dick Award, reflects a fluency in multiple languages—not just English and Hindi, but the idioms of both particle physics and fantastical narratives that reach far beyond what science can (as of yet, at least) describe.“One of the things that really bothers me about how we think about the world is that we split it up into all these different disciplines and fields that have impenetrable walls between them, and one of the reasons I love … writing science fiction is that it allows us to make those walls porous,” Singh says.A reader might think that an expert in both particle physics and climate science might hesitate to write stories that explore impossibilities like time travel or machines “that cannot exist because they violate the known laws of reality” (the subject of the collection’s eponymous tale). But Singh embraces paradox and the simple truth that there’s still much about the universe that we don’t understand.Scientists are supposed to be objective and “check their emotions at the door,” she says. But it “isn't that simple because, after all, the paradox is that we are a part of the universe, studying the universe. And so how can we claim full objectivity?” Singh feels the only way to be authentic is “to acknowledge who I am as a human, as this little splinter of the universe conversing with another little splinter of the universe.”Several of the stories’ characters are, like Singh, female scientists, and their struggles to be taken seriously reflect real-world conditions.“In the physical sciences, it's still pretty tough for women,” says Singh, an assistant professor of physics at Framingham State University. “We have plenty of gender issues in India but the assumption that women can't do as well or don’t have the ability … is not that strong or strident in India.” In the U.S., however, “the negative micro-messaging and sometimes macro-messaging I've come across has been ‘Well a woman, so what do you know?’ You’re automatically assumed to be more touchy-feely and … you must not be as good at science, which is utterly absurd.”For Singh, physics and storytelling are intrinsically linked. “The way that I think about physics is really influenced by the way I think about story, and they're different but they talk to each other,” she says. For instance, she’s used fiction “to explore concepts that help me also conceptualize climate science for the classroom and beyond, and think of or reframe different ways of thinking about climate change and what's happening to our world. … I guess one analogy I could make is binocular vision. I have two ways of seeing the world, and they talk to each other so you get more depth.”Rob Wolf is the author of The Khronos Chronicles. He worked for a decade as a journalist and now serves as director of communications at a non-profit dedicated to justice reform. Follow him on Twitter: @RobWolfBooks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

42mins

20 Jun 2019

Loading