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Amanda Palmer

63 Podcast Episodes

Latest 5 Feb 2023 | Updated Daily

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02 Trashy Breakups: Bad Habit | Amanda Palmer and Neil Gaiman

Trashy Divorces

This one is a breakup that wasn't: in May 2020, musician Amanda Palmer took to Patreon to announce the apparent end of her marriage to fantasy author Neil Gaiman, but the split was short lived and they're (probably) happily back together now. Stacie walks us through how Amanda became "The Most Hated Woman On The Internet" and the author of a must-read memoir for anyone trying to get a creative project off the ground. As with everything, it's complicated!SponsorsKiwiCo. Redefine learning with play! Get 30% off your first month plus free shipping on any crate line with code trashy at kiwico.com.Dipsea. Get 30 days of full access to steamy stories for free when you go to dipseastories.com/trashy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

30mins

13 Jul 2022

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Ep 97 - Authenticity: Lessons We Can Learn from Amanda Palmer, Musician and Co-Founder of The Dresden Dolls

Master Your Roles

Take a deep dive into being more expressive and authentic in all that you do. We'll cover peak performance, creating a role list, and how a creativity-driven approach to planning your week will unleash your authenticity. Visit www.masteryourroles.com

22mins

15 Jun 2022

Similar People

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May 25, 2022 Ralph Waldo Emerson, Miss Amanda Palmer, George Orwell, The Ripley Garden, Potted History by Catherine Horwood, and Louisa Yeomans King

The Daily Gardener

Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1803 Birth of Ralph Waldo Emerson, American transcendentalist, essayist, philosopher, and poet. After graduating from Harvard, Ralph decided to go by his middle name, Waldo. He was beloved by his fellow Harvard classmates, and many became his lifelong friends. Waldo served as his class poet.  Waldo met his first wife, Ellen, on Christmas Day six years later. Two years later, he lost her to tuberculosis. Her death eventually made him a wealthy man — although Waldo had to sue his inlaws to get his inheritance. After losing Ellen, Waldo traveled to Europe and visited the Royal Botanical Garden while he was in Paris. The experience was a revelation to him. There Waldo began to see connections between different plant species thanks to Jussieu's natural way of organizing the garden. The American historian and biographer Robert D. Richardson wrote about this period of heightened awareness for Waldo. He wrote, Emerson's moment of insight into the interconnectedness of things in the Jardin des Plantes was a moment of almost visionary intensity that pointed him away from theology and toward science.   When he returned to the states, Waldo became friends with other forward thinkers and writers of his time: William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Thomas Carlyle. In 1835, Waldo married again. His second wife was named Lydia Jackson. Waldo changed her name to Lidian, and he also had many pet names for her, like Queenie and Asia - but she always called him "Mr. Emerson." Around that time, Waldo began to think differently about the world and his perspective on life. As the son of a minister, his move away from religion and societal beliefs was quite impressive. In 1836, Waldo published his philosophy of transcendentalism in an essay he titled "Nature." He wrote: Nature is a language and every new fact one learns is a new word;  but it is not a language taken to pieces and dead in the dictionary, but [a] language put together into a most significant and universal sense.  I wish to learn this language, not that I may know a new grammar, but that I may read the great book that is written in that tongue.   Waldo also advised, Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.   As Waldo grew older, he immensely enjoyed gardening. His time in the garden also proved revelatory. Waldo had hired workers to help him in the landscape as a younger man. As a mature man, he recognized the benefits of exercise and a feeling of satisfaction from doing garden work all by himself. Waldo wrote, When I go into the garden with a spade and dig a bed, I feel such an exhilaration and [good] health that I discover that I have been defrauding myself all this time in letting others do for me what I should have done with my own hands.   He also quipped, All my hurts my garden spade can heal. In the twilight of his life, Ralph Waldo Emerson was invited to join a group of nine intellectuals on a camping trip in the Adirondacks. The trip had one mission: to connect with nature. Waldo's traveling companions included Harvard's naturalist Louis Agassiz, the great botanist James Russell Lowell, and the American naturalist Jeffries Wyman. They had a marvelous time. It was Ralph Waldo Emerson who wrote, The landscape belongs to the person who looks at it.   And another Waldo quote is a personal favorite, The Earth laughs in flowers.   Finally, here's a little prayer Waldo wrote to thank God for the gifts of nature. For flowers that bloom about our feet; For tender grass, so fresh, so sweet; For song of bird, and hum of bee; For all things fair we hear or see, Father in heaven, we thank Thee!   1909 On this day, Miss Amanda Palmer, a teacher at Wilmington Normal School in Wilmington, North Carolina, shared her experience of taking her students on nature-based field trips. Her report was published in the Atlantic Educational Journal. Amanda wrote, On a field trip, a pupil... gains more of life's lessons than could possibly be learned in the schoolroom. These trips lead the children to ask questions, which the teacher must answer.  My class is composed of children in the fourth year primary. On one trip, trees of the neighborhood were studied. The flowers commanded our attention on still another trip. [Flowers like] the wild carrot, the yarrow, and wild mustard were examined. On one occasion a great mullein, or velvet dock, was brought into school. It was greatly admired by the children. On the next field trip no child had to be told what a mullein was. They, themselves, each saw and knew the mullein. On our trips, we sometimes catch glimpses of shy, wild creatures-a water-snake or, perhaps, a prairie hen. Again we may see only tracks here, the tiny footprints of a field-mouse; there, the path of a snake. On one trip we looked for birds especially, using field glasses. After hearing and seeing many birds, we sat down, about six o'clock in the evening, to listen to the concert--not one for which we were forced to give a silver offering, but a concert free to all. It was the sweetest music ever heard.  On May 25, 1909, we either saw or heard these birds: A phoebe, a pewee, a flicker, a cuckoo, a black and white warbler, a magnolia warbler, a chestnut-sided warbler, a water thrush, a Maryland yellow-throat, a red-start, a catbird, a brown thrasher, a Carolina wren and a hermit thrush. I think it is very instructive to show children the various birds' nests. They have observed, with keenest wonder, the blackbird's nest, the swinging nest of the oriole, the mud-lined nest of the robin, the feather-lined nest of the plain English sparrow, and the horsehair-lined nest of the red-eyed vireo ("vir-ē-ˌō").  I have [recently] added... a catbird's nest and a barn swallow's nest. [And when I was] in Haddonfield, N. J., I learned where a hummingbird's nest was. It will be [added to] the school's collection.   And then Amanda ends with this recommendation. [The following nature books are] helpful and interesting: The Audubon Leaflets, The Home Nature Study Library, and Julia Rogers' Among Green Trees.   Wilmington Normal School (where Amanda taught) was the first school in Wilmington, North Carolina, to admit African-American students. The school operated from 1868 to 1921.   1939 On this day, George Orwell, English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic, wrote that his hens had laid two hundred eggs in the previous two weeks. When George returned to his home in Wallington after the Spanish Civil War, he recorded the activity of his chickens as he recovered from his war injuries and another bout of lung issues. George noted everything about his chickens: their daily egg production, their behavior, and what they ate and required in terms of care. George's diary begins in April, three years after arriving at Wallington, We have now twenty-six hens, the youngest about eleven months. Yesterday seven eggs (the hens have only recently started laying again.)  Everything greatly neglected, full of weeds, etc., ground very hard & dry, attributed to heavy falls of rain, then no rain at all for some weeks. . . .  Flowers now in bloom in the garden: polyanthus, aubretia, scilla, grape hyacinth, oxalis, a few narcissi.  Many daffodils in the field...These are very double & evidently not real wild daffodil but bulbs dropped there by accident. Bullaces & plums coming into blossom.  Apple trees budding but no blossom yet.  Pears in full blossom.  Roses sprouting fairly strongly.   Well, there you go - a little update from George Orwell about his garden over 90 years ago. And before I forget, there's a fabulous book from 2021 called Orwell's Roses by Rebecca Solnit, and when it debuted, it received all kinds of critical acclaim. It was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for non-fiction, and the writer, Margaret Atwood, raved that it was an exhilarating romp through Orwell's life and times — and also the life and times of roses. And Harper's said that it was "A captivating account of Orwell as a gardener, lover, parent, and endlessly curious thinker." And then the publisher wrote this, In the spring of 1936, a writer planted roses.” So begins Rebecca Solnit’s new book, a reflection on George Orwell’s passionate gardening and the way that his involvement with plants, particularly flowers, illuminates his other commitments as a writer and antifascist, and on the intertwined politics of nature and power.   1988 On this day, the Ripley Garden at the Smithsonian was dedicated. Tucked in between the Arts and Industries Building and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Ripley Garden is home to rare and unusual trees and shrubs as well as annuals and perennials - many in elevated beds, Which is terrific for folks of all different abilities and also for little children, it gets the garden up to eye level. And it's lovely for people like me with rheumatoid arthritis or arthritis in general because you don't have to stoop Over to see the flowers, It's all brought up to at least waist level, and you can examine Many of the specimens very closely. And also just want to say that this garden is immaculately maintained. The garden was the inspiration of Mary Livingston Ripley. She was a lifelong plant scholar, collector, gardener, and wife of the Smithsonian's eighth Secretary. Mary came up with the idea for a "fragrant garden" in a location slated to become a parking lot. In 1978, she rallied the Women's Committee of the Smithsonian Associates to support the garden. That group was an organization Mary founded in 1966 to raise money for Smithsonian projects. Ten years later, on this day in 1988, the Women's Committee recognized their founder and friend, Mary Livingston Ripley, by naming the garden after her. In 1996, Mary Livingston Ripley's obituary shared some fascinating details about her life. During the twenty years her husband worked at the Smithsonian, [Mary] frequently accompanied him on scientific expeditions to exotic reaches throughout the Far East.  She volunteered her time to fundraising and gardening exhibits at the museum. Mary was an avid gardener at her homes in Washington and in Litchfield. She was the person behind the Smithsonian's huge collection of orchids. She was also adept at skinning birds and turning over rocks in search of insects. Today, a lovely woman named Janet Draper is the horticulturist for the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden - a position she has relished since 1997. You can see her work on the Smithsonian Gardens Twitter feed. It's one of my favorite feeds on Twitter to follow. So check that out. And also, I'm a friend of Janet's on Facebook. So I get to see all her posts about the incredible flowers and rare specimens planted in that garden. The garden posts are just absolutely astounding. Janet is a wonderful person, and I met her during the Garden Bloggers Fling in DC several years ago. So I would be remiss not to mention the wonderful and dedicated Janet Draper in conjunction with the Ripley Garden.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation Potted History by Catherine Horwood  This book came out in 2021. It's one of my favorites. This is a revised edition, and the subtitle is: How Houseplants Took Over Our Homes. This is a great little garden history book, and it's all about houseplants. Now houseplants are crazy popular, and that's one of the reasons why Catherine revised this book. It was over a decade ago when the first edition came out, and so this is the second edition. As Catherine mentions, a surprising amount has changed in the story of plants in the home since this book first appeared. Now, what has caused this massive expansion in popularity? Well, in addition to the pandemic, which turned so many people toward gardening and growing houseplants. That trend had already started but was definitely nudged along by the pandemic. Catherine believes three factors have contributed to this overwhelming demand for houseplants. First, improved propagation techniques lead to increased availability and lower prices, which is fantastic. For me, our local Hy-Vee grocery store has a beautiful floral section. I find it quite interesting that the houseplant area is right at the east entrance of my store - that's the side that I always like to go in, of course, because the houseplants are there. But I am entirely fascinated that houseplants are impulse buys these days and are positioned at the front of the store. And while cut flowers are offered, they are not as close to the entrance as houseplants - they're a little further in the store.  Another factor behind the houseplant craze is changing lifestyles - particularly of millennials. Millennials are definitely into houseplants. When I took my daughter to college this past fall, her roommate took up half of the windowsill with her houseplants, and then my daughter's houseplants took up the other half of the windowsill. But as a wise gardener - and knowing that my daughter's room was facing north plus knowing Emma would forget about plant care - 99.9% of the houseplants I sent along with Emma were permanent stems or fake. That said, I did have two super tough live plants in the mix. One of them was moss in a closed terrarium environment. Yes, I am a gardener, and yes, I love houseplants — but I'm also a realist. The other factor causing the phenomenal growth of houseplants is social media. Just the other day. I saw someone post a picture of their living room on Twitter, and it was filled with houseplants. Somewhere in the back of this jungle, you could just see one lone chair, and the caption was, "Is this too many houseplants?" Even I was like, yes - that is too many houseplants. So crazy. There is no doubt that social media has encouraged this trend of houseplants, bringing plants indoors and turning your home into a conservatory. In the introduction, Catherine tells of a man named Sir Hugh Platt. He was a garden writer, and he published one of the first books on gardening techniques. He was also the first person to write a little section about having a garden within doors. Sir Hugh Platt would have loved an idea house that I saw a couple of years ago. Sponsored by one of our local nurseries, the home is updated in the spring and fall with all of these wonderful decor ideas. One particular year, they took one of the bedrooms upstairs and turned it into an indoor potting shed. Fantastic idea. The upstairs bath doubled as a place to wash your hands or water some plants. The little potting bench in the middle of the room was so cute. They also repurposed a bookshelf to serve as their system for organizing all their garden paraphernalia, their garden books, and their garden supplies. A beautiful display of different containers and pots - and tons of terracotta - made me go wild for this room idea. So, if you love this craze of indoor houseplants, you will love Catherine's book of houseplant history and the fascinating stories behind some of our most beloved houseplants. And what better time of year to read about houseplants than right now? This week, most gardeners are starting to move their houseplants back outside for summer, where there'll be deliriously happy before they have to come back in for the winter. And if you are giving someone the gift of a houseplant, then, by all means, order a few copies of Catherine's book to include that along with the present. Talk about amping up a houseplant gift! Sizewise, this is a little book. I love it by the chair in my garden library. And the cover is so pleasant. It's beautifully illustrated with just a single little houseplant. It is just so stinking cute. It's 176 pages of houseplant history. So who wouldn't love that? You can get a copy of Potted History by Catherine Horwood and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $8.   Botanic Spark 1905 On this day, Louisa Yeomans King wrote in her diary recorded in the book The Flower Garden Day by Day: MAY 25. Species lilacs are wonderfully interesting. If there is room, get a few of these;  if there is no room, get one or two,  and if there is room for but one, get Syringa sweginzowi superba, or Syringa oblata for its crimson leaves in October, the only lilac to color so.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

25mins

25 May 2022

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Amanda Palmer on spending the pandemic in New Zealand, her early love of The Beatles, The Stray Cats and The Cure, her recent discovery of 1920's Jazz great Bix Beiderbecke and why the internet should be a public utility.

The Sound of Success with Nic Harcourt

Amanda Palmer is a best-selling author, feminist songwriter, community leader, pianist, and ukulele enthusiastic!She began her career with the highly regarded theatrical punk cabaret duo, the Dresden Dolls, before moving on to diverse solo work such as the groundbreaking crowdfunded "Theater is Evil" album, which debuted at the top of the billboard 200 in 2012 and remains the top funded original music project on Kickstarter.In 2013, she presented her Ted talk, The Art of Asking, which has been viewed over 20 million times, later expanding it into the New York times bestselling memoir. "The Art of Asking: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help". Amanda was an early adopter of the Patreon platform to fund her artwork with an average of 15,000 patrons micro supporting her creations each month. In 2019, she released her album. "There Will Be No Intermission" and spent the next year touring the record with its themes and songs of life, death, abortion, and miscarriage.Amanda joins Nic to talk about the two years she spent in New Zealand riding out the pandemic, her thoughts on the evolution of Social Media and some musical guilty pleasures, including Katy Perry and Shakira.

58mins

12 May 2022

Most Popular

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Let’s Discuss Amanda Palmer’s Substack vs. Mitch Horowitz’s Medium - Idea Diary Ep.201

Idea Diary

In Episode 201 of Idea Diary - Today, I ramble about the differences why you would want to start a Medium account vs a Substack account. You could have both! SubStack Check Out: Amanda Palmer https://amandapalmer.substack.com Medium Check Out: Mitch Horowitz https://mitch-horowitz-nyc.medium.com SHOW MERCH: Get Your Own Idea Diary https://www.amazon.com/dp/0991338839 Idea Diary is a guided journal that keeps your ideas chronicled and archived. This bright teal hardcover book is an idea organizational system, as well as gorgeous book decor! If you liked today's show, you can always BUY ME COFFEE: https://gumroad.com/l/VazlaO JOIN MY MONTHLY MEMBERSHIP: https://gumroad.com/l/GJyXzO Thank you so much for listening today! #BusinessLifestyle #AmandaPalmer #MitchHorowitz "Idea Diary" is a business lifestyle podcast about creative entrepreneurship. "Idea Diary" focuses on building creative businesses, and chronicles how Valerie Aiello uses multiple skills to create products, illustrations, film, music, and businesses. SHOW DISCLAIMER: EVERY INDIVIDUAL’S OBSTACLES AND SOLUTIONS ARE UNIQUE. THESE TIPS ARE SUGGESTIONS ONLY TO IMPLEMENT IN YOUR SUITABLE OWN WAY. THIS IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE. THIS IS NOT FINANCIAL ADVICE. — Valerie Aiello is a multi-hyphenate brand expert from Austin, Texas. — Website: https://www.valerieaiello.com — Subscribe to follow my business journey! Gumroad: https://gumroad.com/valerieaiello Medium: https://medium.com/@valerieaiello Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/valerieaiello LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/valerieaiello/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/valerieaiello Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/valerieaiello Instagram: http://instagram.com/valerieaiello/--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/valerieaiello/support

11mins

21 Jan 2022

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Black Obsidian Sound System: Lisa Amanda Palmer with Nzinga Sounds

FACT Liverpool

Black Obsidian Sound System: Lisa Amanda Palmer with Nzinga Sounds is the second of two episodes of podcasts produced by Sable Radio with FACT and Liverpool Biennial to accompany the exhibition ‘The Only Good System is a Sound System’ by artist collective Black Obsidian Sound System. This episode is a conversation between writer and Deputy Director of the Stephen Lawrence Foundation, Lisa Amanda Palmer, and veteran DJ duo Nzinga Sounds, as they talk about their formation, experiences of being Black women in sound system culture, and their role in the wider Black arts movement in the eighties and nineties. For more information about FACT’s programme, head to fact.co.uk See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

44mins

20 Aug 2021

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Seizing Darkness with Musician Amanda Palmer

Awaken

What role does darkness play in the journey toward enlightenment? In this episode, hear about the power of darkness and what it means to embrace it. Musician, songwriter, and best-selling author Amanda Palmer shares the story of her childhood, the trajectory of her life as a street performer to musician, and how embracing her own darkness set her free. Amanda begins by considering a painting of the powerful, fierce guardian Yama Dharmaraja. This fearsome deity wears a crown of skulls and a garland of freshly severed heads, is surrounded by flames, and stands astride a buffalo and human corpse. While ominous, this is actually a depiction of wisdom—one that destroys egos and fiercely protects Buddhist teachings.Visit the podcast webpage to see the art that inspired this episode, read a transcript, donate, and more:https://rubinmuseum.org/mediacenter/approaching-the-mandala-with-amanda-palmer-awaken-podcastAbout the podcast:AWAKEN is a 10-episode series from the Rubin Museum of Art hosted by acclaimed musician and performance artist Laurie Anderson that explores the dynamic path to enlightenment and what it means to "wake up." Each episode dives into the personal stories of guests who share how they've experienced a shift in their awareness, and as a result, their perspective on life. From deep introspection to curious life-changing moments, awakening can take many forms, from the mundane to the sacred. Taking inspiration from the exhibition "Awaken: A Tibetan Buddhist Journey Toward Enlightenment," each story uses artworks as a jumping off point as we hear from authors, artists, wisdom bearers, and Buddhist teachers, because every journey is different.

33mins

29 Jun 2021

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THERE WILL BE NO INTERMISSION: AMANDA PALMER (2021)

Auckland Writers Festival

Writer, singer, musician and lyricist Amanda Palmer has garnered a vibrant cult following for her creative outputs which include New York Times best-selling memoir and manifesto 'The Art of Asking'. She is supported by a circle of almost 15,000 patrons across the globe who micro-fund her writing and work through the Patreon platform.​​​Slated to finish up an 80-date international tour of her third solo studio album, the searingly stark There Will Be No Intermission, in Wellington in 2020 as Covid struck, she is currently working from the Antipodes​In a conversation with writer and friend Catherine Robertson she canvasses widely around the importance of telling our stories and speaking our truths, writing through grief and discomfort, and the juggle of whānau, community and expression, and offers up some ukulele interludes.AUCKLAND WRITERS FESTIVAL WAITUHI O TĀMAKI 2021

1hr 6mins

14 Jun 2021

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Epilogue: The Art of Asking: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help, by Amanda Palmer

By The Book

Kristen & Jolenta respond to listener questions about The Art of Asking: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help, by Amanda Palmer.Join the By The Book Patreon Community! For $5 per month, you receive a new book summary, including all the rules we live by, each week. For $10 per month, you receive that PLUS a weekly affirmation podcast hosted by Jolenta and Kristen! Learn more at https://www.patreon.com/listentobythebookKristen and Jolenta's new book How to be Fine is available now [amazon.com].You can subscribe to Jolenta and Kristen's show, We Love You (And So Can You) on Stitcher, Apple Podcasts [podcasts.apple.com], or wherever you listen to podcasts.We love hearing from you! CALL us at 302-49B-OOKS. Email us at kristenandjolenta@gmail.com, or tweet us @jolentag, @kristenmeinzer, or @bythebookpod.And if you haven't already, please join our By The Book Facebook community! https://www.facebook.com/groups/116407428966900/?source_id=475465442806687To get By the Book merch, head over to PodSwag.com: https://www.podswag.com/collections/by-the-bookCheck out Kristen's other podcasts! The Pursuit of Happier on Knowable https://knowable.fyi/courses/happiness [knowable.fyi]Innovation Uncovered https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/innovation-uncovered/id1516667844Movie Therapy with Rafer & Kristenhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/movie-therapy-with-rafer-kristen/id1508455193

41mins

20 May 2021

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The Art of Asking: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help, by Amanda Palmer

By The Book

Kristen & Jolenta live by The Art of Asking: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help, by Amanda Palmer. Will they learn to let go of shame and begin asking with gratitude?Join the By The Book Patreon Community! For $5 per month, you receive a new book summary, including all the rules we live by, each week. For $10 per month, you receive that PLUS a weekly affirmation podcast hosted by Jolenta and Kristen! Learn more at https://www.patreon.com/listentobythebookKristen and Jolenta's new book How to be Fine is available now [amazon.com].You can subscribe to Jolenta and Kristen's show, We Love You (And So Can You) on Stitcher, Apple Podcasts [podcasts.apple.com], or wherever you listen to podcasts.We love hearing from you! CALL us at 302-49B-OOKS. Email us at kristenandjolenta@gmail.com, or tweet us @jolentag, @kristenmeinzer, or @bythebookpod.And if you haven't already, please join our By The Book Facebook community! https://www.facebook.com/groups/116407428966900/?source_id=475465442806687To get By the Book merch, head over to PodSwag.com: https://www.podswag.com/collections/by-the-bookCheck out Kristen's other podcasts! The Pursuit of Happier on Knowable https://knowable.fyi/courses/happiness [knowable.fyi]Innovation Uncovered https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/innovation-uncovered/id1516667844Movie Therapy with Rafer & Kristenhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/movie-therapy-with-rafer-kristen/id1508455193

53mins

13 May 2021

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