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7 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Saul Levmore. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Saul Levmore, often where they are interviewed.

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7 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Saul Levmore. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Saul Levmore, often where they are interviewed.

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One of Chicago’s Best Ideas was the Coase Theorem, which reminds us daily that people can bargain around law or even before legal intervention is sought. But do we have too much law and too little bargaining around it? The number of cases and judges has grown dramatically over time and many problems are outsourced to the legal system, rather than being handled person-to-person. In this talk, I will consider conventional explanations for the astonishing growth of the legal system, and then suggest that it is not entirely good news. We have become addicted to law, and like most addictions, this one is difficult to undo and likely to grow.

Saul Levmore is William B. Graham Distinguished Service Professor of Law. This Chicago's Best Ideas talk was presented on November 5, 2019.

Nov 15 2019

1hr 7mins

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Saul Levmore, "If the Common Law was Efficient, Why Did It Decline?"

The University of Chicago Law School Faculty Podcast
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One of the University of Chicago Law School’s best known ideas or outputs over the last fifty years is that the common law (made by judges and often passed down and adapted over many years) is efficient. It was an idea advanced by Richard Posner, with respect to tort law, in his time as a professor here, but it is also reflected in his and other judicial opinions which students across the country meet in almost every non-constitutional course. What does this idea really mean, and is it plausible or even correct? If yes, why did the common law decline in influence? Statutes and regulations have far more impact on our present-day lives than does the common law. Judges are now known and evaluated for their constitutional decisions rather than for what they do in contracts and torts and other areas that are often described as common-law subjects. Could the common law solve our current concerns about climate change and autonomous vehicles?

Saul Levmore is the William B. Graham Distinguished Service Professor of Law.

This Chicago's Best Ideas lecture was presented on October 15, 2018.

Oct 23 2018

1hr 3mins

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Saul Levmore, "Carrots and Sticks in Law (and Life)"

The University of Chicago Law School Faculty Podcast
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One of the great Chicago Ideas is the equivalence of positive and negative incentives. The government can motivate you by rewarding some behavior or by penalizing your failure to behave in the preferred manner. Private parties rarely have the authority to hit you with sticks, so they must usually begin with carrots, or positive inducements, unless law offers torts or other negative inducements in the background. But things quickly get more complicated. Rewards might draw people to an activity, and penalties might cause them to stay away, so that the carrots and sticks are not equivalent. How does law reflect these secondary effects? When is it a good idea to mix positive and negative rewards? Should we pay people not to commit crimes? Why didn’t any lawmakers try to pay people not to enter into same-sex marriages? Why not just impose higher taxes on people who do not engage in public service? This first lecture of the year in our Chicago’s Best Ideas series introduces some of these ideas and then takes them in surprising directions.

Saul Levmore is the William B. Graham Distinguished Service Professor of Law.

Jan 05 2017

1hr 5mins

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Saul Levmore, "What Do Lawmakers Do?"

The University of Chicago Law School Faculty Podcast
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Lawmakers respond to constituents, seek higher office, have lofty goals, and even learn from their mistakes. But do they actually make the world a better place? In this lecture, the first of this year’s Chicago’s Best Ideas series, Professor Levmore examines some aspects of lawmaking that do not make their way into the law school curriculum. First, lawmakers may be forward-looking, but they have tools that are backward looking, or retroactive, and this combination can help us understand why some lawmaking is quite durable, while some of it falls apart both physically (like crumbling bridges) and conceptually (like conventional views about sex and marriage). Second, lawmakers might be rewarded when they innovate successfully, but they are penalized harshly for making changes that backfire. This trade-off helps us understand where we do or do not observe experiments and progress, ranging from Uber to health-care.

Saul Levmore is the William B. Graham Distinguished Service Professor of Law.

This Chicago's Best Ideas lecture was recorded on October 13, 2015.

Nov 05 2015

1hr 2mins

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Saul Levmore, "How Does Law Work? Concentration and Distribution Strategies"

The University of Chicago Law School Faculty Podcast
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Two of the best ideas of the last half-century describe strategies for using legal remedies to solve social problems. One is the concentration of liability on a well-situated problem solver, or “least cost-avoider,” who can always contract out the work to be done (thus reflecting Chicago’s Very Best and Biggest Idea, the Coase Theorem). But another is the opposite of the first, for it involves the distribution, or spreading, of legal responsibility across many potential problem solvers, who might cooperate or work alone. Comparative negligence and Superfund liability for environmental harms reflect this strategy.

This Chicago’s Best Ideas talk explores this tug-of-war, or evolutionary pattern, involving the two opposing strategies. How does law know which to use? Most important, what is the likely evolution of law as citizens call on Big Government to solve their big problems, like climate change or access to health care, and how does technological change alter the likely balance between these two strategies?

Saul Levmore is the William B. Graham Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded on October 21, 2014, as part of the Chicago's Best Ideas lecture series.

Nov 07 2014

56mins

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Conversation with Martha Nussbaum and Saul Levmore on their new book, "American Guy: Masculinity in American Law and Literature"

Campus Events
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If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

University of Chicago Law School faculty members Saul Levmore and Martha Nussbaum discuss a new book they have co-edited, “American Guy: Masculinity in American Law and Literature.” Levmore is the William B. Graham Distinguished Service Professor of Law, and Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics in the Law School, Department of Philosophy, Divinity School, and the College.

American Guy: Masculinity in American Law and Literature
“American Guy” examines American norms of masculinity and their role in the law, bringing a range of methodological and disciplinary perspectives to the intersection of American gender, legal, and literary issues. The collection opens with a set of papers investigating “American Guys”—the heroic nonconformists and rugged individualists who populate much of American fiction. Diverse essays examine the manly men of Hemingway, Dreiser, and others in their relation to the law, while also highlighting the underlying tensions that complicate this version of masculinity. A second set of papers examines “Outsiders”—men on the periphery of the American Guys who proclaim a different way of being male. These essays take up counter-traditions of masculinity ranging from gay male culture to Philip Roth’s portrait of the Jewish lawyer.

Oct 13 2014

10mins

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Saul Levmore and Martha Nussbaum - Hearsay Culture Show #154 - KZSU-FM (Stanford)

Center for Internet and Society
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A talk show on KZSU-FM, Stanford, 90.1 FM, hosted by Center for Internet & Society Resident Fellow David S. Levine. The show includes guests and focuses on the intersection of technology and society. How is our world impacted by the great technological changes taking place? Each week, a different sphere is explored. This week, David interviews Dean Saul Levmore and Prof. Martha Nussbaum of The University of Chicago Law School, co-editors of The Offensive Internet: Speech, Privacy, and Reputation. For more information, please go to http://hearsayculture.com.

Dec 01 2011

54mins

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