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Austin Walker Podcasts

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Austin Walker. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Austin Walker, often where they are interviewed.

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Austin Walker. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Austin Walker, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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7: Austin Walker | Living with Purpose & Authenticity

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Austin Walker is a business development group manager at Avanade consulting firm a birth child of Accenture and Microsoft. Previously, he worked in sales at Gartner Research and Advisory Firm. Also, Austin is a co-host for a podcast called Purpenthicity, to support people in living with purpose and authenticity. Along with starting his coaching practice RAW coaching.

In this episode, we cover 1) Austin's career journey and how the feeling of misalignment lead him to go on a path of self-discovery 2) Starting his podcast & coaching business 3) Personal growth principles that are important for Austin: Namely, having mentors, seeking help when needed and being vulnerable 4) Why the Black Lives Matter movement is important for us all to understand and get behind.

Aug 09 2020 · 49mins
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35. Finding Your Purpose and Live an Authentic Life with Austin Walker

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35. Finding Your Purpose and Living an Authentic Life, host William Glass sits down with Austin Walker, co-host of Purpenthicity, a certified life coach, and technology sales executive. We dive not only into Austin’s backstory and where his focus on living a purpose-driven life comes from but discuss his experience as a Black man navigating corporate America and growing up in a predominately white neighborhood. Austin and I discuss where the blend of personal finance, education, and opportunity coincide to incite change.

By day Austin is a sales leader for Avanade, the world’s leading Microsoft service implementation partner, where he liaises with Fortune 500 businesses. He's the son of a Super Bowl Champion and a proud alum of the University of Maryland where he played collegiate football. Austin has a passion for supporting people to be the best versions of themselves and has a strong affinity for purpose-driven people. Living a purpose-driven life is tied closely towards his hyper intentional pursuit of personal growth & learning. He's enrolled in Accomplishment Coaching, a program that trains ontological coaching methodology. In addition, Austin co-hosts a podcast called Purpenthicity.

IG: @Purpenthicity @Austin.Walker.29

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Jul 10 2020 · 1hr 11mins
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Episode 108, Austin Walker, Sales Leader, Podcaster, Authentic & Purposeful Terp for Life

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Austin Walker is a passionate, enthusiastic, and relentlessly optimistic force who strives to make a distinct impact on all whom he encounters. He's the son of a Super Bowl Champion for the Washington Redskins (#httr !) and a proud alumni from the University of Maryland where he played collegiate football. Austin played in 49 of 50 career games as a walk-on who earned a full scholarship for the Terrapins. Austin's college football experience cemented the grit, work ethic, and raw passion that oozes from his spirit.

By day Austin is a sales leader for Avande, the world’s leading Microsoft service implementation partner, where he liaises with Fortune 500 businesses to facilitate the utilization of technology as a competitive differentiator to drive sustained growth. While he enjoys working with senior business leaders to support organization growth, his true passions lie in fostering personal growth and development. Austin has a passion for supporting people to be the best versions of themselves and and a strong affinity for purpose-driven people.

2020 and beyond is dedicated towards purpose identification and alignment for Austin. His sole focus is to uncover the most important question we all must answer, what am I on Earth to accomplish? Living a purpose-driven life will be tied closely towards his hyper intentional pursuit of personal growth and learning. Austin strives to be a resource to support others on their purpose journey. He's currently interviewing to be a public speaking coach for a prominent global communication effectiveness organization and enrolled in Accomplishment Coaching, a program that trains ontological coaching methodology. In addition, creating content for his followers to consume is a priority as Austin seeks to expand his reach. Austin is currently establishing a platform for blogging along with a reoccurring newsletter to coincide with his ongoing podcast production with Purpenthicity.

In this episode I catch up with Austin as he's out on a cross country road trip and encouraging others to utilize the power of their voice in the wake of the George Floyd murder. Follow Austin @austin.walker.29 and catch the Purpenthicity podcast on Apple podcasts & follow @Purpenthicity Email Austin at rawalker29@gmail.com for more info about his coaching services.
Jun 17 2020 · 55mins
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Austin Walker: From Giant Bomb to Waypoint, How to be a Good GM, And Working With the WWE

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For our first episode, we're joined by Austin Walker, host of the popular podcasts Friends at the Table and Waypoint Radio and formerly of Giant Bomb. He's here to talk about his journey from academia to the games industry, the rise of D&D, editorial battles with sales and PR, and much more in this extended conversation with host Jeff Green.

Hosted by USgamer: https://www.usgamer.net/

Jun 10 2020 · 2hr 1min
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Final Fantasy VII Remake, ACNH, Horizon's Gate (ft. Austin Walker)

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We break quarantine to hang out with Austin Walker (Waypoint Radio, Friends at the Table) and discuss some of the biggest games of the month - Final Fantasy VII Remake, which captures at least some of the magic of the original, and Animal Crossing New Horizons, which has been softening our brains into mush for almost a month now. We wrap up with some discussion of an indie RPG called Horizon's Gate, the PS5, and  videogame journalism as an institution.

BAD END is proud to be part of SUPERCULTURE, a network of podcasts and websites dedicated to the underobserved. Tweet us @superculturenet

Special thanks to our Patreon subscribers, and shout out to Wesley Martin and Alyse Stanley for donating at the Bad End Patron tier! Become a contributor at patreon.com/badend

5:59 - Why are so many videogame journalists into wrestling?

13:50 - FFVII Remake

1:00:19 - Animal Crossing New Horizons

1:23:10 - Will the next generation of videogame console tech bring a significant creative leap?

1:34:53 - Horizon's Gate

1:38:40 - Waypoint, Kill Screen, and videogame journalism

Intro/Outro music is "TABOO" by SEIHO

Apr 16 2020 · 2hr 9mins
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34 | 1 Kings 21 Line by Line Bible study with Austin Walker

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#BibleStudy #ExpositoryPreaching #AustinWalker

1 Kings Overview First and Second Kings were originally one book, called in the Hebrew text, “Kings,” from the first word in 1:1. The Greek translation of the OT, the Septuagint (LXX), divided the book in two, and this was followed by the Latin Vulgate (Vg.) version and English translations. The division was for the convenience of copying this lengthy book on scrolls and codexes and was not based on features of content. Modern Hebrew Bibles title the books “Kings A” and “Kings B.” The LXX and Vg. connected Kings with the books of Samuel, so that the titles in the LXX are “The Third and Fourth Books of Kingdoms” and in the Vg. “Third and Fourth Kings.” The books of 1 and 2 Samuel and 1 and 2 Kings combined are a chronicle of the entire history of Judah’s and Israel’s kingship from Saul to Zedekiah. First and Second Chronicles provides only the history of Judah’s monarchy. Kings concentrates, then, on the history of the sons of Israel from 971 to 561 B.C. First Kings 1:1–11:43 deals with Solomon’s accession and reign (971–931 B.C.). The two divided kingdoms of Israel and Judah (931–722 B.C.) are covered in 1 Kin. 12:1; 2 Kin. 17:41. The author arranged the material in a distinctive way in that the narration follows the kings in both the N and the S. For each reign described, there is the following literary framework. Every king is introduced with: 1) his name and relation to his predecessor; 2) his date of accession in relationship to the year of the contemporary ruler in the other kingdom; 3) his age on coming to the throne (for kings of Judah only); 4) his length of reign; 5) his place of reign; 6) his mother’s name (for Judah only); and 7) spiritual appraisal of his reign. This introduction is followed by a narration of the events that occurred during the reign of each king. The details of this narration vary widely. Each reign is concluded with: 1) a citation of sources; 2) additional historical notes; 3) notice of death; 4) notice of burial; 5) the name of the successor; and 6) in a few instances, an added postscript (i.e., 1 Kin. 15:32; 2 Kin. 10:36). Second Kings 18:1–25:21 deals with the time when Judah survived alone (722–586 B.C.). Two concluding paragraphs speak of events after the Babylonian exile (2 Kin. 25:22–26, 27–30). Three theological themes are stressed in Kings. First, the Lord judged Israel and Judah because of their disobedience to His law (2 Kin 17:7–23). This unfaithfulness on the part of the people was furthered by the apostasy of the evil kings who led them into idolatry (2 Kin. 17:21, 22; 21:11), so the Lord exercised His righteous wrath against His rebellious people. Second, the word of the true prophets came to pass (1 Kin. 13:2, 3; 22:15–28; 2 Kin. 23:16; 24:2). This confirmed that the Lord did keep His Word, even His warnings of judgment. Third, the Lord remembered His promise to David (1 Kin. 11:12–13, 34–36; 15:4; 2 Kin. 8:19). Even though the kings of the Davidic line proved themselves to be disobedient to the Lord, He did not bring David’s family to an end as He did the families of Jeroboam I, Omri, and Jehu in Israel. Even as the book closes, the line of David still exists (2 Kin. 25:27–30), so there is hope for the coming “seed” of David (see 2 Sam. 7:12–16). The Lord is thus seen as faithful, and His Word is trustworthy. About your Teacher Austin Walker was born in North London in 1946. He studied firstly at the University of Aberystwyth, Wales. Following graduation from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, he returned to the UK in 1971 and subsequently became pastor of Maidenbower Baptist Church in Crawley, Sussex. He retired in March 2018 after over forty years of pastoral ministry and oversight. Very happily married to Mai for forty nine years, they have four married children and ten grandchildren.

100s more resources available at https://exposittheword.com/

Audio used with permission from Austin Walker

Jan 08 2020 · 1hr 3mins
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21 | 1 Kings 13 Line by Line Bible study with Austin Walker

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#BibleStudy #ExpositoryPreaching #AustinWalker

1 Kings Overview First and Second Kings were originally one book, called in the Hebrew text, “Kings,” from the first word in 1:1. The Greek translation of the OT, the Septuagint (LXX), divided the book in two, and this was followed by the Latin Vulgate (Vg.) version and English translations. The division was for the convenience of copying this lengthy book on scrolls and codexes and was not based on features of content. Modern Hebrew Bibles title the books “Kings A” and “Kings B.” The LXX and Vg. connected Kings with the books of Samuel, so that the titles in the LXX are “The Third and Fourth Books of Kingdoms” and in the Vg. “Third and Fourth Kings.” The books of 1 and 2 Samuel and 1 and 2 Kings combined are a chronicle of the entire history of Judah’s and Israel’s kingship from Saul to Zedekiah. First and Second Chronicles provides only the history of Judah’s monarchy. Kings concentrates, then, on the history of the sons of Israel from 971 to 561 B.C. First Kings 1:1–11:43 deals with Solomon’s accession and reign (971–931 B.C.). The two divided kingdoms of Israel and Judah (931–722 B.C.) are covered in 1 Kin. 12:1; 2 Kin. 17:41. The author arranged the material in a distinctive way in that the narration follows the kings in both the N and the S. For each reign described, there is the following literary framework. Every king is introduced with: 1) his name and relation to his predecessor; 2) his date of accession in relationship to the year of the contemporary ruler in the other kingdom; 3) his age on coming to the throne (for kings of Judah only); 4) his length of reign; 5) his place of reign; 6) his mother’s name (for Judah only); and 7) spiritual appraisal of his reign. This introduction is followed by a narration of the events that occurred during the reign of each king. The details of this narration vary widely. Each reign is concluded with: 1) a citation of sources; 2) additional historical notes; 3) notice of death; 4) notice of burial; 5) the name of the successor; and 6) in a few instances, an added postscript (i.e., 1 Kin. 15:32; 2 Kin. 10:36). Second Kings 18:1–25:21 deals with the time when Judah survived alone (722–586 B.C.). Two concluding paragraphs speak of events after the Babylonian exile (2 Kin. 25:22–26, 27–30). Three theological themes are stressed in Kings. First, the Lord judged Israel and Judah because of their disobedience to His law (2 Kin 17:7–23). This unfaithfulness on the part of the people was furthered by the apostasy of the evil kings who led them into idolatry (2 Kin. 17:21, 22; 21:11), so the Lord exercised His righteous wrath against His rebellious people. Second, the word of the true prophets came to pass (1 Kin. 13:2, 3; 22:15–28; 2 Kin. 23:16; 24:2). This confirmed that the Lord did keep His Word, even His warnings of judgment. Third, the Lord remembered His promise to David (1 Kin. 11:12–13, 34–36; 15:4; 2 Kin. 8:19). Even though the kings of the Davidic line proved themselves to be disobedient to the Lord, He did not bring David’s family to an end as He did the families of Jeroboam I, Omri, and Jehu in Israel. Even as the book closes, the line of David still exists (2 Kin. 25:27–30), so there is hope for the coming “seed” of David (see 2 Sam. 7:12–16). The Lord is thus seen as faithful, and His Word is trustworthy. About your Teacher Austin Walker was born in North London in 1946. He studied firstly at the University of Aberystwyth, Wales. Following graduation from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, he returned to the UK in 1971 and subsequently became pastor of Maidenbower Baptist Church in Crawley, Sussex. He retired in March 2018 after over forty years of pastoral ministry and oversight. Very happily married to Mai for forty nine years, they have four married children and ten grandchildren.

100s more resources available at https://exposittheword.com/

Audio used with permission from Austin Walker

Jan 08 2020 · 51mins
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19. 1 Kings 12:1-24 Line by Line Bible study with Austin Walker

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#BibleStudy #ExpositoryPreaching #AustinWalker

1 Kings Overview First and Second Kings were originally one book, called in the Hebrew text, “Kings,” from the first word in 1:1. The Greek translation of the OT, the Septuagint (LXX), divided the book in two, and this was followed by the Latin Vulgate (Vg.) version and English translations. The division was for the convenience of copying this lengthy book on scrolls and codexes and was not based on features of content. Modern Hebrew Bibles title the books “Kings A” and “Kings B.” The LXX and Vg. connected Kings with the books of Samuel, so that the titles in the LXX are “The Third and Fourth Books of Kingdoms” and in the Vg. “Third and Fourth Kings.” The books of 1 and 2 Samuel and 1 and 2 Kings combined are a chronicle of the entire history of Judah’s and Israel’s kingship from Saul to Zedekiah. First and Second Chronicles provides only the history of Judah’s monarchy. Kings concentrates, then, on the history of the sons of Israel from 971 to 561 B.C. First Kings 1:1–11:43 deals with Solomon’s accession and reign (971–931 B.C.). The two divided kingdoms of Israel and Judah (931–722 B.C.) are covered in 1 Kin. 12:1; 2 Kin. 17:41. The author arranged the material in a distinctive way in that the narration follows the kings in both the N and the S. For each reign described, there is the following literary framework. Every king is introduced with: 1) his name and relation to his predecessor; 2) his date of accession in relationship to the year of the contemporary ruler in the other kingdom; 3) his age on coming to the throne (for kings of Judah only); 4) his length of reign; 5) his place of reign; 6) his mother’s name (for Judah only); and 7) spiritual appraisal of his reign. This introduction is followed by a narration of the events that occurred during the reign of each king. The details of this narration vary widely. Each reign is concluded with: 1) a citation of sources; 2) additional historical notes; 3) notice of death; 4) notice of burial; 5) the name of the successor; and 6) in a few instances, an added postscript (i.e., 1 Kin. 15:32; 2 Kin. 10:36). Second Kings 18:1–25:21 deals with the time when Judah survived alone (722–586 B.C.). Two concluding paragraphs speak of events after the Babylonian exile (2 Kin. 25:22–26, 27–30). Three theological themes are stressed in Kings. First, the Lord judged Israel and Judah because of their disobedience to His law (2 Kin 17:7–23). This unfaithfulness on the part of the people was furthered by the apostasy of the evil kings who led them into idolatry (2 Kin. 17:21, 22; 21:11), so the Lord exercised His righteous wrath against His rebellious people. Second, the word of the true prophets came to pass (1 Kin. 13:2, 3; 22:15–28; 2 Kin. 23:16; 24:2). This confirmed that the Lord did keep His Word, even His warnings of judgment. Third, the Lord remembered His promise to David (1 Kin. 11:12–13, 34–36; 15:4; 2 Kin. 8:19). Even though the kings of the Davidic line proved themselves to be disobedient to the Lord, He did not bring David’s family to an end as He did the families of Jeroboam I, Omri, and Jehu in Israel. Even as the book closes, the line of David still exists (2 Kin. 25:27–30), so there is hope for the coming “seed” of David (see 2 Sam. 7:12–16). The Lord is thus seen as faithful, and His Word is trustworthy. About your Teacher Austin Walker was born in North London in 1946. He studied firstly at the University of Aberystwyth, Wales. Following graduation from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, he returned to the UK in 1971 and subsequently became pastor of Maidenbower Baptist Church in Crawley, Sussex. He retired in March 2018 after over forty years of pastoral ministry and oversight. Very happily married to Mai for forty nine years, they have four married children and ten grandchildren.

100s more resources available at https://exposittheword.com/

Audio used with permission from Austin Walker

Jan 08 2020 · 54mins
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7 | 1 Kings 7 Line by Line Bible study with Austin Walker

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#BibleStudy #ExpositoryPreaching #AustinWalker

1 Kings Overview

First and Second Kings were originally one book, called in the Hebrew text, “Kings,” from the first word in 1:1. The Greek translation of the OT, the Septuagint (LXX), divided the book in two, and this was followed by the Latin Vulgate (Vg.) version and English translations. The division was for the convenience of copying this lengthy book on scrolls and codexes and was not based on features of content. Modern Hebrew Bibles title the books “Kings A” and “Kings B.” The LXX and Vg. connected Kings with the books of Samuel, so that the titles in the LXX are “The Third and Fourth Books of Kingdoms” and in the Vg. “Third and Fourth Kings.” The books of 1 and 2 Samuel and 1 and 2 Kings combined are a chronicle of the entire history of Judah’s and Israel’s kingship from Saul to Zedekiah. First and Second Chronicles provides only the history of Judah’s monarchy. Kings concentrates, then, on the history of the sons of Israel from 971 to 561 B.C. First Kings 1:1–11:43 deals with Solomon’s accession and reign (971–931 B.C.). The two divided kingdoms of Israel and Judah (931–722 B.C.) are covered in 1 Kin. 12:1; 2 Kin. 17:41. The author arranged the material in a distinctive way in that the narration follows the kings in both the N and the S. For each reign described, there is the following literary framework. Every king is introduced with: 1) his name and relation to his predecessor; 2) his date of accession in relationship to the year of the contemporary ruler in the other kingdom; 3) his age on coming to the throne (for kings of Judah only); 4) his length of reign; 5) his place of reign; 6) his mother’s name (for Judah only); and 7) spiritual appraisal of his reign. This introduction is followed by a narration of the events that occurred during the reign of each king. The details of this narration vary widely. Each reign is concluded with: 1) a citation of sources; 2) additional historical notes; 3) notice of death; 4) notice of burial; 5) the name of the successor; and 6) in a few instances, an added postscript (i.e., 1 Kin. 15:32; 2 Kin. 10:36). Second Kings 18:1–25:21 deals with the time when Judah survived alone (722–586 B.C.). Two concluding paragraphs speak of events after the Babylonian exile (2 Kin. 25:22–26, 27–30). Three theological themes are stressed in Kings. First, the Lord judged Israel and Judah because of their disobedience to His law (2 Kin 17:7–23). This unfaithfulness on the part of the people was furthered by the apostasy of the evil kings who led them into idolatry (2 Kin. 17:21, 22; 21:11), so the Lord exercised His righteous wrath against His rebellious people. Second, the word of the true prophets came to pass (1 Kin. 13:2, 3; 22:15–28; 2 Kin. 23:16; 24:2). This confirmed that the Lord did keep His Word, even His warnings of judgment. Third, the Lord remembered His promise to David (1 Kin. 11:12–13, 34–36; 15:4; 2 Kin. 8:19). Even though the kings of the Davidic line proved themselves to be disobedient to the Lord, He did not bring David’s family to an end as He did the families of Jeroboam I, Omri, and Jehu in Israel. Even as the book closes, the line of David still exists (2 Kin. 25:27–30), so there is hope for the coming “seed” of David (see 2 Sam. 7:12–16). The Lord is thus seen as faithful, and His Word is trustworthy.

About your Teacher

Austin Walker was born in North London in 1946. He studied firstly at the University of Aberystwyth, Wales. Following graduation from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, he returned to the UK in 1971 and subsequently became pastor of Maidenbower Baptist Church in Crawley, Sussex. He retired in March 2018 after over forty years of pastoral ministry and oversight. Very happily married to Mai for forty nine years, they have four married children and ten grandchildren.

100s more resources available at https://exposittheword.com/

Audio used with permission from Austin Walker

Dec 29 2019 · 57mins
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6 | 1 Kings 5 Line by Line Bible study with Austin Walker

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#BibleStudy #ExpositoryPreaching #AustinWalker

1 Kings Overview

First and Second Kings were originally one book, called in the Hebrew text, “Kings,” from the first word in 1:1. The Greek translation of the OT, the Septuagint (LXX), divided the book in two, and this was followed by the Latin Vulgate (Vg.) version and English translations. The division was for the convenience of copying this lengthy book on scrolls and codexes and was not based on features of content. Modern Hebrew Bibles title the books “Kings A” and “Kings B.” The LXX and Vg. connected Kings with the books of Samuel, so that the titles in the LXX are “The Third and Fourth Books of Kingdoms” and in the Vg. “Third and Fourth Kings.” The books of 1 and 2 Samuel and 1 and 2 Kings combined are a chronicle of the entire history of Judah’s and Israel’s kingship from Saul to Zedekiah. First and Second Chronicles provides only the history of Judah’s monarchy. Kings concentrates, then, on the history of the sons of Israel from 971 to 561 B.C. First Kings 1:1–11:43 deals with Solomon’s accession and reign (971–931 B.C.). The two divided kingdoms of Israel and Judah (931–722 B.C.) are covered in 1 Kin. 12:1; 2 Kin. 17:41. The author arranged the material in a distinctive way in that the narration follows the kings in both the N and the S. For each reign described, there is the following literary framework. Every king is introduced with: 1) his name and relation to his predecessor; 2) his date of accession in relationship to the year of the contemporary ruler in the other kingdom; 3) his age on coming to the throne (for kings of Judah only); 4) his length of reign; 5) his place of reign; 6) his mother’s name (for Judah only); and 7) spiritual appraisal of his reign. This introduction is followed by a narration of the events that occurred during the reign of each king. The details of this narration vary widely. Each reign is concluded with: 1) a citation of sources; 2) additional historical notes; 3) notice of death; 4) notice of burial; 5) the name of the successor; and 6) in a few instances, an added postscript (i.e., 1 Kin. 15:32; 2 Kin. 10:36). Second Kings 18:1–25:21 deals with the time when Judah survived alone (722–586 B.C.). Two concluding paragraphs speak of events after the Babylonian exile (2 Kin. 25:22–26, 27–30). Three theological themes are stressed in Kings. First, the Lord judged Israel and Judah because of their disobedience to His law (2 Kin 17:7–23). This unfaithfulness on the part of the people was furthered by the apostasy of the evil kings who led them into idolatry (2 Kin. 17:21, 22; 21:11), so the Lord exercised His righteous wrath against His rebellious people. Second, the word of the true prophets came to pass (1 Kin. 13:2, 3; 22:15–28; 2 Kin. 23:16; 24:2). This confirmed that the Lord did keep His Word, even His warnings of judgment. Third, the Lord remembered His promise to David (1 Kin. 11:12–13, 34–36; 15:4; 2 Kin. 8:19). Even though the kings of the Davidic line proved themselves to be disobedient to the Lord, He did not bring David’s family to an end as He did the families of Jeroboam I, Omri, and Jehu in Israel. Even as the book closes, the line of David still exists (2 Kin. 25:27–30), so there is hope for the coming “seed” of David (see 2 Sam. 7:12–16). The Lord is thus seen as faithful, and His Word is trustworthy.

About your Teacher

Austin Walker was born in North London in 1946. He studied firstly at the University of Aberystwyth, Wales. Following graduation from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, he returned to the UK in 1971 and subsequently became pastor of Maidenbower Baptist Church in Crawley, Sussex. He retired in March 2018 after over forty years of pastoral ministry and oversight. Very happily married to Mai for forty nine years, they have four married children and ten grandchildren.

100s more resources available at https://exposittheword.com/

Audio used with permission from Austin Walker

Dec 29 2019 · 46mins
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