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Michael Hattem

10 Podcast Episodes

Latest 4 Apr 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Michael Hattem, "Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Michael Hattem’s Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution (Yale, 2020) is a fascinating new look at how eighteenth-century Americans thought about the past. Not merely an academic exercise, history was a catalyst of colonial and early republican identity. This historical consciousness was not, Hattem argues, static—on the contrary, as North Americans went from British subjects to rebels to independent Americans, so too did their attitudes toward the past change.Hattem roots his analysis in a broad range of evidence spanning from history books to almanacs, newspaper articles, novels, and museums. How did North Americans think about the colonial past? How did they understand their past in relation to the British past? How immediately relevant was the past to their own political activities? How did thinking about the past foster national unity? All these questions and many more besides find nuanced engagement in Past and Prologue, a book that is sure to appeal to anyone interested in how America came to be. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

55mins

9 Mar 2021

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Michael Hattem, "Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Michael Hattem’s Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution (Yale, 2020) is a fascinating new look at how eighteenth-century Americans thought about the past. Not merely an academic exercise, history was a catalyst of colonial and early republican identity. This historical consciousness was not, Hattem argues, static—on the contrary, as North Americans went from British subjects to rebels to independent Americans, so too did their attitudes toward the past change.Hattem roots his analysis in a broad range of evidence spanning from history books to almanacs, newspaper articles, novels, and museums. How did North Americans think about the colonial past? How did they understand their past in relation to the British past? How immediately relevant was the past to their own political activities? How did thinking about the past foster national unity? All these questions and many more besides find nuanced engagement in Past and Prologue, a book that is sure to appeal to anyone interested in how America came to be. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

55mins

9 Mar 2021

Similar People

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Michael Hattem, "Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Michael Hattem’s Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution (Yale, 2020) is a fascinating new look at how eighteenth-century Americans thought about the past. Not merely an academic exercise, history was a catalyst of colonial and early republican identity. This historical consciousness was not, Hattem argues, static—on the contrary, as North Americans went from British subjects to rebels to independent Americans, so too did their attitudes toward the past change.Hattem roots his analysis in a broad range of evidence spanning from history books to almanacs, newspaper articles, novels, and museums. How did North Americans think about the colonial past? How did they understand their past in relation to the British past? How immediately relevant was the past to their own political activities? How did thinking about the past foster national unity? All these questions and many more besides find nuanced engagement in Past and Prologue, a book that is sure to appeal to anyone interested in how America came to be. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

55mins

9 Mar 2021

Episode artwork

Michael Hattem, "Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in British Studies

Michael Hattem’s Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution (Yale, 2020) is a fascinating new look at how eighteenth-century Americans thought about the past. Not merely an academic exercise, history was a catalyst of colonial and early republican identity. This historical consciousness was not, Hattem argues, static—on the contrary, as North Americans went from British subjects to rebels to independent Americans, so too did their attitudes toward the past change.Hattem roots his analysis in a broad range of evidence spanning from history books to almanacs, newspaper articles, novels, and museums. How did North Americans think about the colonial past? How did they understand their past in relation to the British past? How immediately relevant was the past to their own political activities? How did thinking about the past foster national unity? All these questions and many more besides find nuanced engagement in Past and Prologue, a book that is sure to appeal to anyone interested in how America came to be. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

55mins

9 Mar 2021

Most Popular

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Michael Hattem, "Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Michael Hattem’s Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution (Yale, 2020) is a fascinating new look at how eighteenth-century Americans thought about the past. Not merely an academic exercise, history was a catalyst of colonial and early republican identity. This historical consciousness was not, Hattem argues, static—on the contrary, as North Americans went from British subjects to rebels to independent Americans, so too did their attitudes toward the past change.Hattem roots his analysis in a broad range of evidence spanning from history books to almanacs, newspaper articles, novels, and museums. How did North Americans think about the colonial past? How did they understand their past in relation to the British past? How immediately relevant was the past to their own political activities? How did thinking about the past foster national unity? All these questions and many more besides find nuanced engagement in Past and Prologue, a book that is sure to appeal to anyone interested in how America came to be. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

55mins

9 Mar 2021

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Michael Hattem on the Long Tradition of Fashioning an American Past

Podopticon

It turns out that working and reworking American identity is as old as the creation of the republic itself. As we’ll see in this episode, the thing called “American History” is not a static set of truths to be uncovered, but a story that has had numerous versions told by individuals with their own motivations.This and much more is uncovered in this discussion with Michael Hattem, author of "Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution."In this episode, we’ll discuss, among other things, how the American Revolution stands out from the Russian and the French; we’ll hear how colonists understood the past in relation to the present and how that understanding underwent its own transformation after the Revolution; we’ll talk about the creation of what Hattem calls an “American antiquity;” we’ll trace this and various other American efforts at cultural independence from Britain, including the creation of Columbus as the discoverer of America and the establishment of natural history museums and historical societies–all of which was the work of a network of individuals Hattem calls “cultural nationalists.”Stick around for a conversation with a thoughtful author who helps us better understand the American Revolution, “American History,” and the interplay of the two.   

46mins

12 Feb 2021

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Reflecting on the Work and Legacy of Bernard Bailyn with Michael Hattem

The Rogue Historian

I chat with historian of Early America Michael Hattem, author of the forthcoming Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution, about the work of Bernard Bailyn...and the convo is fascinating. This is the first in a series of discussions concerning major figures in American historiography - enjoy!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-rogue-historian/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-rogue-historian/support

1hr 7mins

24 Aug 2020

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Michael Hattem, on the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument

Gotham Center Podcasts

In this episode of The Gotham Center podcast “Sites and Sounds,” Michael Hattem talks about the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, where the remains of nearly eleven thousand soldiers are buried, captives of the British who often died from unspeakable treatment and torture during the American Revolution. New York was central to the military strategy of both the patriots and loyalists, and the scene of that war’s most important battle. Yet the city is seldom remembered as a major stage in our nation’s struggle for independence. Here, Hattem -- a visiting professor of history at Knox College, finishing a book on the surprisingly tense debates over popular memory of the Revolution during the early years of the republic -- explains why. For more podcasts like this, and for more Gotham Center programming, visit us at GothamCenter.org and sign up to our mail list. Thanks for listening.

26mins

7 Jan 2019

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48. "From GED to PhD” with Michael Hattem

Eat Sleep Write with Adam Scull

Michael Hattam, a PhD student in early American history at Yale University. He never graduated high school and only received a GED when he was 17. After spending his 20s doing various jobs such as data entry and being a messenger in New York City, he enrolled at the Borough of Manhattan Community College in the fall of 2007. After two years there, he transferred to the City College of New York, from where he graduated in 2011. Michael was fortunate enough to be offered admission to Yale University's PhD program in History with a living stipend, full tuition remission, and health care for himself and both his boys, 7 and 6.

22mins

11 Aug 2013

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[BLOCKED] 48. "From GED to PhD” with Michael Hattem

the

Michael Hattam, a PhD student in early American history at Yale University. He never graduated high school and only received a GED when he was 17. After spending his 20s doing various jobs such as data entry and being a messenger in New York City, he enrolled at the Borough of Manhattan Community College in the fall of 2007. After two years there, he transferred to the City College of New York, from where he graduated in 2011. Michael was fortunate enough to be offered admission to Yale University's PhD program in History with a living stipend, full tuition remission, and health care for himself and both his boys, 7 and 6.

22mins

11 Aug 2013