OwlTail

Cover image of Marc Brettler

Marc Brettler

10 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Jul 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Episode140: Marc Brettler And The Jewish Interpretation Of Scripture

What If Project

In today's episode Marc Brettler talks to us about the book he wrote with AJ Levine, "The Bible With And Without Jesus".  Marc is an expert in the Old Testament and today he takes us to school and gives us a glimpse into reading the Bible through the eyes of Jewish people.  Enjoy! SHOW NOTES: Patreon Buy Me A Coffee What If Project Community  Heretic Shop Marc Brettler The Bible With And Without Jesus SPECIAL MUSIC: Derek Webb - Apple Music - Spotify

1hr 1min

8 Mar 2021

Episode artwork

Episode 154: Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Brettler - How Jews & Christians Read the Bible Differently

The Bible For Normal People

It shouldn’t be a surprise to us now that people can read the same text and walk away with vastly different meanings. On this episode of the podcast, we’re talking with Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Brettler who share some reasons why Jews and Christians use and understand the Bible in different ways. Show Notes →Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-bible-for-normal-people/donationsAdvertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

50mins

15 Feb 2021

Similar People

Episode artwork

Marc Brettler & Amy-Jill Levine - The Bible With and Without Jesus

Valley Beit Midrash

Rabbi Dr. Shmuly Yanklowitz, President & Dean of Valley Beit Midrash, interviews Professor Marc Zvi Brettler, Bernice and Morton Lerner Professor in Judaic Studies at Duke University, and Professor Amy-Jill Levine, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School, on the topic of "The Bible With and Without Jesus." DONATE: http://www.bit.ly/1NmpbsPBUY THE BOOK: https://www.harpercollins.com/products/the-bible-with-and-without-jesus-amy-jill-levinemarc-zvi-brettlerFor podcasts of VBM lectures, GO HERE:https://www.valleybeitmidrash.org/learning-library https://www.facebook.com/valleybeitmidrashBECOME A MEMBER: https://www.valleybeitmidrash.org/become-a-memberValley Beit Midrash is proud to host the Jaburg Wilk Learning Season. Learn more about Jaburg Wilk at: http://www.jaburgwilk.com/

18mins

4 Nov 2020

Episode artwork

S1E56 - Dr. Amy-Jill Levine and Dr. Marc Brettler on the Book of Jonah – “A World in Four Short Chapters”

The Rabbi's Husband

Mark is delighted to be joined by Dr. Amy-Jill (AJ) Levine and Dr. Marc Brettler, the editors of the Jewish Annotated New Testament, on today’s episode. AJ is a Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University, and Marc is a Professor in Judaic Studies at Duke University. Both prolific authors, Marc has taught at Yale University, Brown University, Wellesley College and Middlebury College, and AJ has taught at Swarthmore College, Cambridge University, and in 2019 was the first Jew to teach a New Testament course at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome. Together, they have chosen the Book of Jonah, which Mark considers ‘word for word the best book ever written’, to discuss today.Their conversation is a dynamic and thought provoking one that embodies the nature of the book they have chosen. While exploring the complexity of the text, they share questions and interpretations regarding it, delving into such aspects as the prevalence of animals within it, its lessons regarding repentance, its differing meaning for Christians and Jews, and the potential content of a fifth chapter. AJ and Marc share the lessons they have learned about mankind which also relate directly to the Book of Jonah, and they offer a preview of their new book, particularly its demonstration of the differences between Christian and Jewish readings and approaches to biblical texts as well as the mutual respect that can grow out of these differences. Together with Mark, these two learned scholars bring out so many of the ‘endlessly profound lessons and teachings both for children and adults that this great book offers’, rendering this a thoroughly fascinating and informative episode.Episode Highlights: AJ and Marc’s summary of the Book and its meaning for them and all of us The difference in the way Jews and Christians read the story The original short story The prevalence of animals in the story The complex theology of the story What makes this story so complicated Questions the book raises for children and adults What makes some Biblical books so great The meaning of Jonah’s story for Christians The book’s question about repentance Creating a Jonah Chapter 5 The lessons AJ and Marc have learned about mankind Their new book, The Bible With and Without Jesus: How Jews and Christians Read the Same Stories Differently The differences between Jewish and Christian approaches to biblical readings Quotes:“This is a book about care, it’s a book about divine care.”“Part of the Jewish reception history which recognizes the story is a profound meditation on issues of repentance and responsibility, and at the same time it’s rollickingly funny.” “Although the book itself is fictional, there was a real prophet named Jonah.”“You can have more than one reading and they can both be right.”“Jonah may be interested in preserving his people. He’s also just a remarkably whiny, passive-aggressive, self-centered puppet who may want to see this destruction because it makes him look like a great prophet who got it right.”“It’s big, it’s big, it’s big!”“God usually gets a pass on things, right?”“His passive-aggressive arguments don’t seem to work.”“What is the responsibility for having done evil if you repent of your ways?”“I think that humanity has an infinite imagination.”“There are many different ways of reading the same text, and really can learn to respect each other through the same text even read differently.”“The Jewish tradition will always say, ‘But what does this text mean to me?’”Book of Jonah - https://www.sefaria.org/Jonah.1.1-4.11?lang=biLinks:The Rabbi’s Husband homepage: http://therabbishusband.com/Mark’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/markgerson?lang=enThe Jewish Annotated New Testament: https://www.amazon.com/Jewish-Annotated-New-Testament/dp/0195297709

38mins

21 Sep 2020

Most Popular

Episode artwork

32: A Jewish Annotated New Testament with Marc Brettler and Amy-Jill Levine

Jewish History Matters

Join our community on Facebook | Join our mailing list Marc Brettler and Amy-Jill Levine join us to discuss the Jewish Annotated New Testament: what it means to have a “Jewish” version of the New Testament, how we can effectively understand the New Testament as a “Jewish” book within its historical and social context, and why all this matters in terms of scholarly developments as well as the relationship between Judaism and Christianity today. Purchase the Jewish Annotated New Testament on Amazon Marc Brettler is the Bernice and Morton Lerner Professor of Jewish Studies at Duke University’s Department of Religious Studies. He’s published widely on the Bible on topics including metaphor, the nature of biblical historical texts, and gender issues. His many books include the Jewish Study Bible, which he co-edited with Adele Berlin; How to Read the Jewish Bible; The Bible and the Believer: How to Read the Bible Critically and Religiously; and The Creation of History in Ancient Israel; among many others. Amy-Jill Levine is University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies and  Mary Jane Werthan Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt Divinity School and College of Arts and Sciences; she’s also an Affiliated Professor at the Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations at Cambridge. Currently she is teaching at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome. AJ’s books include The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus; The Meaning of the Bible: What the Jewish Scriptures and the Christian Old Testament Can Teach Us (co-authored with Douglas Knight); The New Testament, Methods and Meanings (co-authored with Warren Carter), Short Stories by Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi; Entering the Passion of Jesus; and, most recently The Gospel of Luke (co-authored with Ben Witherington III).   Marc and AJ, as two tremendously prolific scholars of the Jewish Bible and the New Testament, each have deep knowledge of the historical context of the New Testament as well as of how it has been interpreted over the centuries. Together, they edited the Jewish Annotated New Testament in 2011, and they subsequently produced a second, expanded edition in 2017. The Jewish Annotated New Testament has four main components: The text of the New Testament itself (using the New Revised Standard Version translation), introduction to the Gospels and Acts, and to the Epistles and Revelation, introductions to each of the books and extensive annotations to the text, and over 50 essays on topics including the historical and social context of the New Testament, Jewish religious movements of the Second Temple period, Jewish practices and beliefs, the relationship between Jews and Gentiles, and Jewish responses to Jesus of Nazareth, Paul of Tarsus, and Mary the mother of Jesus throughout the centuries. The Jewish Annotated New Testament, as we discuss in this episode, highlights the historical and religious context of the New Testament as a set of Jewish texts—that is to say, texts written about Jews and in many cases by people who were themselves Jews, knowledgeable in Jewish theological traditions and textual interpretation. Throughout history, too many people have forgotten (or consciously ignored) that Jesus was a Jew, as were all of his first followers; or, they have sought to instrumentalize this history for polemical purposes. There has been, of course, a great deal of serious scholarship on the New Testament over the centuries, but the NT has also been at the center of sometimes violent debates between Jews and Christians, too. It thus represents a particularly interesting though sometimes problematic text, especially when we keep in mind that several passages have prompted dangerous anti-Jewish stereotypes and narratives at the heart of centuries of animosity. At the same time, one can point to the changing dynamics of Jewish-Christian relations especially after the Holocaust, in part through Christians, as individuals and as Church communions trying to come to terms both with what the New Testament says about Jews and how those texts have been interpreted. In a certain way, part of what I think is so interesting about the Jewish Annotated New Testament is that it is very much a product of our time: a synthesis of the newest academic scholarship, first of all, and it also represents the possibilities of Jewish-Christian relations today. With this history and context in mind, Marc and AJ have accomplished the remarkable feat of presenting the New Testament in a scholarly, readable, and accessible format for Jews, without any kind of aim of proselytizing—indeed, they are both themselves Jews. It’s also a valuable resource for Christian and indeed for any readers who will want to better understand these texts and their historical and social context, and especially for religious leaders who want to be able to better understand and teach about Judaism, Jesus, his followers and Christian origins in the first and early second centuries of the Common Era. The annotations and essays distill generations of scholarship on the background and meaning of these texts, their contexts, and their reception and ramifications. When necessary, they confront those passages that have been a source for anti-Judaism. As a result, the book presents a useful resource for students, scholars, as well as teachers and religious leaders: In situating the New Testament within its historical context, the volume demonstrates how and why the New Testament matters in terms of our understanding of the development of Judaism in the first and second centuries, and also why and how this context is critical in terms of comprehending the emergence of early Christianity and the parting of the ways between Judaism and Christianity.

1hr 8mins

22 Sep 2019

Episode artwork

Psalm 97, with Marc Brettler

First Reading

Righteousness and Justice are the Base of God’s Throne Lectionary Date: June 2, 2019 [7th Sunday of Easter, Year C] This week, Rachel and Tim are joined by Dr. Marc Zvi Brettler, one of the leading scholars in the field of Hebrew Bible. He is Professor Emeritus and former chair of the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University. He has also taught at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Duke University, Yale University, Brown University, Wellesley College, and Middlebury College. He is actively involved in many aspects of Jewish communal life, and has served on the board of Boston’s Leventhal-Sidman Jewish Community Center and Gann Academy—the New Jewish High School. Dr. Brettler is known for helping to build meaningful bridges between Jewish religious life and modern critical scholarship of the Hebrew Bible. He is co-editor of the Jewish Study Bible, which won a National Jewish Book Award. We think this volume should be on every pastor’s bookshelf, and consulted often, along with another of Dr. Brettler’s editorial projects, the Jewish Annotated New Testament. For Christian leaders interested in the shared Scriptures of Judaism and Christianity, these books are must haves. Dr. Brettler has published a slew of other books, both academic and popular. He is a clear and accessible communicator, as you will experience in this week’s First Reading episode. Finally, be sure to visit theTorah.com, which Dr. Brettler helped establish, a great online repository for biblical scholarship from a Jewish perspective.

51mins

20 May 2019

Episode artwork

Professor Marc Brettler: The Bible Says That?

College Commons

In order to uncover the power and mystery of the Bible, we have to read it first. In this episode of the College Commons Podcast, learn some surprising and fascinating places where you can start.Marc Brettler is the Bernice and Morton Lerner Professor of Jewish Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at Duke University. He has also taught at Brandeis University, Yale University, Brown University, Wellesley College and Middlebury College. His has written God is King, The Creation of History in Ancient Israel, The Book of Judges, and Biblical Hebrew for Students of Modern Israeli Hebrew. He is co-author of The Bible and the Believer, and co-editor of the New Oxford Annotated Bible, The Jewish Study Bible, and The Jewish Annotated New Testament, and has contributed to all ten volumes of My People’s Prayer Book. In 2017, he was one of 100 scholars and leaders asked to participate in the “American Values Religious Voices” project. He is currently at work on part of Psalms commentary for JPS, a book on the Jewish reception of critical biblical scholarship, and a co-authored volume with Amy-Jill Levine on passages from the Hebrew Bible that are prominent in early Christianity.He has published and lectured widely on metaphor and the Bible, the nature of biblical historical texts, Psalms, and gender issues and the Bible. He is a member of the American Academy for Jewish Research and the Council of the Society of Biblical Literature, and has written for The Forward and The Jerusalem Report, has appeared on the Television series “Mysteries of the Bible,” was heard on the National Public Radio show “All Things Considered,” and was interviewed on “Fresh Air” by Terry Gross.

24mins

20 Mar 2019

Episode artwork

Episode 13: Marc Brettler - On Being a Jewish Biblical Scholar

The Bible For Normal People

On this episode, Pete and Jared talk with Marc Brettler on the conversation between the insights biblical scholarship, Jewish tradition, and the nature of the Bible.Show Notes →Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-bible-for-normal-people/donationsAdvertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

45mins

19 Jun 2017

Episode artwork

#25—All about the Jewish Annotated New Testament, with Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Brettler [MIPodcast]

Maxwell Institute Podcast

What do Jewish scholars today have to say about the New Testament?The Jewish Annotated New Testament is a landmark piece of scholarship, representing the first time Jewish scholars have annotated and written essays on the complete New Testament. The volume is full of explanatory and contextual footnotes, references to other Jewish works, and a number of essays expanding on the particularly Jewish elements of the Gospels and other Christian writings of the New Testament.Marc Brettler and Amy-Jill Levine co-edited the JANT. In this episode, they join host Blair Hodges to discuss what Jewish scholars have to say about this book of Christian scripture, and to encourage Jews to look more closely at a text they often overlook.About the GuestsAmy-Jill Levine is a professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School. She’s also an affiliated professor at the Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations at Cambridge. Her most recent book is Short Stories by Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi, which will be discussed in a future MIPodcast episode. Marc Brettler is a professor of Biblical Studies at Brandeis University. In addition to the Jewish Annotated New Testament, he also contributed to The Bible and the Believer: How to Read the Bible Critically and Religiously, which was the focus of episode 15 and 16 of the MIPodcast. For more of his work, check out thetorah.com. The post #25—All about the Jewish Annotated New Testament, with Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Brettler [MIPodcast] appeared first on Neal A. Maxwell Institute | BYU.

1hr 6mins

21 Apr 2015

Episode artwork

#15- Reading the Bible critically and religiously, with Marc Brettler [MIPodcast]

Maxwell Institute Podcast

Does academic study of the Bible undermine its value or diminish the religious messages it contains? In 2012, three scholars—a Jew, a Protestant, and a Catholic—came together at the intersection of their academic work on the Bible and their religious faith to discuss that very question. Their outstanding book The Bible and the Believer seeks to demonstrate that religious interpretations of the Bible need not be threatened by Biblical criticism.Representing a Jewish perspective in the book is Marc Zvi Brettler of Brandeis University. In this MIPodcast episode, Dr. Brettler discusses how his religious faith intersects with his scholarly study of the Bible. He also gives a great primer on what constitutes biblical criticism. As Elder John A. Widtsoe once explained, Latter-day Saints have much to learn from modern methods of studying the Bible:“In the field of modern thought the so-called higher criticism of the Bible has played an important part. The careful examination of the Bible in the light of our best knowledge of history, languages and literary form, has brought to light many facts not sensed by the ordinary reader of the Scriptures. Based upon the facts thus gathered, scholars have in the usual manner of science proceeded to make inferences, some of considerable, others of low probability of truth…To Latter-day Saints there can be no objection to the careful and critical study of the scriptures, ancient or modern, provided only that it be an honest study—a search for truth…Whether under a special call of God, or impelled by personal desire, there can be no objection to the critical study of the Bible.” ((Quoted in David Bokovoy, Authoring the Old Testament: Genesis – Deuteronomy (Draper, UT: Greg Kofford Books, 2014), 123.))In a subsequent episode of the MIPodcast, Dr. Peter Enns will join me to give a Protestant’s perspective on reading the Bible critically and religiously.Sadly, Dr. Daniel J. Harrington, S.J., who represented the Catholic perspective, passed away earlier this year. We dedicate these two episodes to him and to his work in biblical scholarship.About Marc Zvi Brettler Marc Brettler is the Dora Golding Professor of Biblical Studies at Brandeis University. He is author of How to Read the Jewish Bible and co-editor of The Jewish Annotated New Testament. For more of his work, check out thetorah.com.The post #15- Reading the Bible critically and religiously, with Marc Brettler [MIPodcast] appeared first on Neal A. Maxwell Institute | BYU.

1hr 15mins

14 Oct 2014