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Django Reinhardt Podcasts

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15 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Django Reinhardt. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Django Reinhardt, often where they are interviewed.

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15 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Django Reinhardt. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Django Reinhardt, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

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Django Reinhardt: Music, Myth and Reality

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Our brand new podcast episode Django Reinhardt: Music, Myth and Reality is a journey into the life of the genius jazz guitarist, Django Reinhardt.

With a host of international musicians performing entirely new music for the podcast, we look at the life of the Roma musician who survived personal tragedy and World War II to become a leading figure in 20th century jazz.

Hosted by our Artistic Director Josephine Burton, this episode features authors Michael Dregni and Garth Cartwright, Roma activist Mania Malik, theatre director Alessandra Davison and musicians Dave KelbieJoe TownsendAurore VoiliqueTcha Limberger, Don Vappie and Dario Napoli.

Make sure you like, subscribe, rate, review and share after listening to help boost us in the charts and get the podcast out to more people.

FULL SONG CREDITS HERE

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Jun 17 2020 · 1hr 8mins
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#16 Denis Chang: Finding Django Reinhardt and navigating the internet as a musician and teacher.

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Denis Chang is a guitarist and educator based in Canada, he runs DC Music School and creates other content for his personal YouTube account. He talks to me of how he started his successful online teaching empire at the same time as developing his own musicianship.

https://denischang.com/

A ‘Green Room’ is the musicians limbo, it is where we sit and wait for our gig to start. The global situation has meant that musicians now all find themselves in a huge green room waiting to be able to get out and play. Join jazz violinist Matt Holborn as he chats to different musicians from all genres and areas of music.

 Links to all episodes and Live Streams below

https://linktr.ee/mattholborn

Jun 09 2020 · 43mins

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Mack & the Movies, Episode 25 - Django Reinhardt

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Hey, folks! Mackenzie here, your host for Mack & the Movies. On this episode, we take a look at the life, music, and pop culture influence of legendary guitarist, Django Reinhardt. Paypal: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=UXZNDGDH4M42W Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CinemaMack/ Twitter: @CinemaMack Contact: m.j.lambert2283@gmail.com Mack & the Movies logo by masteringsounds https://www.fiverr.com/masteringsounds Intro by androzguitar https://www.fiverr.com/androzguitar Audio Clips Used: "Limehouse Blues" - Quintette du Hot Club de France Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grappelli - Jattendrai Swing 1939 - LIVE! (https://youtu.be/ANArGmr74u4) "Minor Swing" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "The Shiek of Araby" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "Nuages" - Django Reinhardt "Sweet Georgia Brown" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "Sweet Georgia Brown" - Harlem Globetrotters "Georgia On My Mind" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "Georgia On My Mind" - Ray Charles "La Mer" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "Beyond the Sea" - Bobby Darin "Runnin' Wild" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "Jeepers Creepers" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "I'll See You In My Dreams" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "Liza (And All the Clouds'll Roll Away)" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "Django's Tiger" - Quintette du Hot Club de France "The Circus of Value" (Bioshock) Sources: Django Reinhart: Le Génie vagabond by Noël Balen Django Reinhardt And The Illustrated History Of Gypsy Jazz by Michael Dregni, with Alain Antonietto and Anne Legrand Django Reinhardt by Charles Delauney Django Reinhardt: Know the Man, Play the Music by Rod Fogg La Grande Roue by Jean Tranchant Django: The Life and Music of a Gypsy Legend by Michael Dregni "Wrembel & Babik Show Both Sides of Gypsy Jazz Coin" by Mackenzie Lambert, Buffalo Rising (28 May 2010) Jeff Beck Interview - Guitar Legends magazine Tommy Iommi Interview (https://youtu.be/mWntXXhCQWw) "Obituary: Stephane Grappelli" by Geoffrey Smith, The Independent (2 December 1997) Jerry Garcia Interview - Frets magazine (June 1985) It's A Long Story: My Life by Willie Nelson, with David Ritz Wikipedia Mack & the Movies on player.fm: https://player.fm/series/2403125 Mack & the Movies on listennotes.com: https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/mack-the-movies-mackenzie-lambert-Mt-xG8nakEc/
Jun 24 2019 · 23mins
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173 - Riot Civil Unrest and Django Reinhardt

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173 - Riot Civil Unrest and Django Reinhardt
Feb 13 2019 · 1hr 24mins
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54 - Django Reinhardt: Gypsy Jazz Legend and Extra Hardt

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We learn what it means to be a gypsy jazz guitar legend... Be extra French, smoke a billion cigarettes, blow off shows to go drunk fishing, and permanently screw up your meat claws in a caravan fire. Worked for Django Reinhardt.

Nov 15 2018 · 1hr 43mins
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Django Reinhardt's "The Rome Sessions Vol. 1 1949/1950"

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This week, Brett brings us a vast collection of Jazz standards performed impeccably by legendary Belgian guitarist Django Reinhardt. We take a listen to “The Rome Sessions Vol 1 1949/1950”. What did the guys think of this foundational jazz release? Hit play and find out!

Follow along with us on Spotify.
Audio Intro: Jahzarr - I Saw You On TV
Video Intro: Lame Drivers - Frozen Egg
Outro: Matthew Walton - I'll See You In My Dreams

Oct 02 2018 · 37mins
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Episode 27 : Django Reinhardt

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We are back! This week we bring you the tale of one of our favorite musicians here at the “All Damn Night” Studio. And joining us again due to popular demand, Geoff Iose is our guest.

Aug 09 2018 · 1hr 8mins
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Episode 6 - Django Reinhardt w/Joel Warren

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I sit down with Joel Warren and discuss Django Reinhardt with him over a cup of hazelnut coffee. We talk about Django's early life, his amazing Holocaust story, and our own personal philosophies about acting, improv, art, and Lincoln, Nebraska. It's a free-flowing word association of a conversation, perfectly suited to the melancholy sounds of that gypsy jazz. Draw a bath and join us, won't you?

Jul 23 2018 · 1hr 41mins
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Gypsy Guitar Django Reinhardt Part2 VV-013

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In my previous Vinyl Vibrations podcast of Gypsy Guitarist-Great, Django Reinhardt, I reviewed some of his early vinyl recordings. I reviewed nine songs which Django composed in the 12-year period between 1937 and 1949. As a composer, Reinhardt was prolific, with at least 112 original compositions to his credit. His own songs, in my opinion, are the most interesting of his works, because they are his creations, and embody his humor and his thinking in a most complete way.

  • M10 Porto Cabello (D. Reinhardt) rec 5/21/1947, Paris, 3:18, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]
  • M11 Double Whisky (D. Reinhardt) rec 5/11/1951, Paris, 2:53, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]
  • M12 Vamp (D. Reinhardt) rec 5/11/1951, Paris, 2:39, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]
  • M13 Fleche D’or (D. Reinhardt) rec 1/30/1952, Paris, 3:00, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]
  • M14 Troublant Bolero (D. Reinhardt) rec 1/30/1952, Paris, 3:30, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]
  • M15 Nuits de St. Germain-des-Pres (D. Reinhardt) rec 1/30/1952, Paris, 3:05, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]
  • M16 Anouman (D. Reinhardt) rec 1/30/1953, Paris, 2:45, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]
  • M17 D.R. Blues (D. Reinhardt) rec 1/30/1953, Paris, 3:08, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]
  • M18 Deccaphonie (D. Reinhardt) rec 4/8/1953, Paris, 3:15, [Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]

In Part I, I reviewed…..

  • M1 Improvisation (D. Reinhardt), rec 1937,
  • M2 Minor Swing (S.Grappelli-D.Reinhardt) , rec 9/9/1937,
  • M3 Naguine (D. Reinhardt), rec 6/30/1939,
  • M4 Djangology (D. Reinhardt), rec 5/8/1942,
  • M5 Blues Clair (D. Reinhardt), rec 2/26/1943
  • M6 Belleville (D. Reinhardt), rec 1950
  • M7 Nuages (D. Reinhardt-J. Larue), rec 2/1/1946
  • M8 Swing 48 (D. Reinhardt), rec 7/6/1947,
  • M9 Brick Top (D. Reinhardt-S. Grappelli), rec Feb 1949

In today’s podcast, Part II, I continue with more of Django’s original compositions.

DJANGO REINHARDT lived in Belgium and France between 1910 and 1953 and is best known, and most widely published, for his performances with his jazz group “Quintette du Hot Club de France”. The quintet popularized the gypsy jazz style, also known as gypsy swing or hot club jazz or jazz manouche.

The story goes that Django and younger brother Joseph Reinhardt were “discovered” one day,   by a French bass player, Louis Vola, as they were playing guitars on a beach at Toulon, a town in southern France. Vola invited them to jam with his own band, which included the young violinist, Stephane Grappelli, and guitarist Roger Chaput.

The “Hot Club de France” was a music society devoted to the preservation of jazz, and two of its leaders and promoters Pierre Nourry and Charles Delaunay urged Django and Stephane to form a full-time group. The rest is history…..and “The QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE was formed in 1934 and remained active for 15 years.

The original lineup included five members, Django, Grappelli, bassist Louis Volla, Django’s brother Joseph, and one other rhythm guitarist, Roger Chaput. There was no real percussion section in the quintette, the two rhythm guitars and bass created all of the percussion in this all-string ensemble. Django and Grappelli remained constants in future recordings, while rhythm guitarists and bassists rolled in and out of the group.

Five years later, when World War II broke out in   1939, the Quintette was on a concert tour of England. Reinhardt, returned home to France, and Grappelli stayed in England throughout WW2. Back in France, Django continued using the Quintette name but without violinist Grappelli, he substituted Hubert Rostaing on clarinet. He also added conventional rhythm section by adding drums.

After the war, in 1946, Grappelli and Django re-teamed under the Quintette banner in an all-string format. and the quintette performed and recorded until about 1948.

All of the songs we review today were recorded in Paris, in five recording sessions, between May 1947 and April 1953. These recordings are found on a rare, two-disc LP set titled “DJANGO REINHARDT et son QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE. This LP set was produced in France in 1973 under the Disques Festival label, and distributed by MUSICDISC-EUROPE.

M10 PORTO CABELLO. Our first song in this podcast is PORTO CABELLO recorded in Paris, May 1947 a Django Reinhardt composition. THE SONG TITLE—PORTO CABELLO…..brings to mind the seaside resort in Venezuela… Puerto Cabello, after which the CABELLO spider was named …… perhaps Django named it after this distant coastal city…..

PORTO CABELLO has some similarities to the movie theme from SOUTH PACIFIC—BALI HAI —a film to appear two years later, in 1949.

PORTO also has similarities to the Cole Porter song Night and Day, in which Django performs here…..

PORTO CABELLO opens and closes with the Hubert Rostaing clarinet melody. The mid-song guitar solo by Django is mind-boggling, given that the high-speed neck runs are all performed with just the first two fingers.

Personnel

  • Hubert Rostaing cl
  • Eugene Vees rg
  • Emmanuel Soudieux, b
  • Pierre Fouad dm
  • Recorded 5/21/1947, Paris,

M11 DOUBLE WHISKY

Another Django Reinhardt Swing classic

The song has a nice, easy going stride to it. This is a larger arrangement, with lead parts for alto sax.…and muted trumpet ….Django is playing an electrified guitar. The album cover photo shows Django with a spruce-top, large-body guitar with electric pickup clamped in place over the sound hole.

DOUBLE WHISKY WAS

Recorded May 11, 1951, PARIS

Personnel included

  • Django on guitar solo
  • Pierre Michelot b
  • Pierre Lemarchand dm
  • Raymond Fol Piano
  • Hubert Fol as
  • Bernard Hullin tp

[Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du Hot Club de France, Distribution Musidisc-Europe1979]

M12 Next up is a song titled VAMP ….this is a beautiful, slow song for a quartet of guitar-sax-bass-and piano—–VAMP is another great Jazz Standard. Easy to learn, VAMP would be a good candidate for an intermediate music class such as Jazz 101.   Again we have lead parts for alto sax and guitar

For those occasional dancers in the room that will do ONLY the slow dances, myself included, one would want a song like VAMP to play much, much longer…..this song lasts only 2 minutes 39 seconds !!

Recorded May 11, 1951, PARIS

Personnel included

  • Django on guitar solo
  • Pierre Michelot b
  • Raymond Fol Piano
  • Hubert Fol as
  • and now…VAMP

M13 Fleche D’Or, that’s French for GOLDEN ARROW

Here we have a somewhat complex and really different sounding introduction and finale theme, with unison playing by guitar muted trumpet and alto sax. This is progressing away from SWING, with more of a bebop sound with a faster pace, alternating rhythms, and a combo consisting of saxophone, trumpet, bass, drums, and piano….plus Django on electric guitar and a screaming guitar at that.. What wild stuff for 1952!!!

Here is an early example of distortion or overdrive from Django’s guitar pickup. I note on the album cover the pickup has a single large white knob, no doubt a control for the amount of GAIN that is sent to the amplifier. Here is an example

It must have been exciting to take his playing to an even higher level, …..by adding amplification and now overdrive/distortion…..AND by progressing into a new style of Jazz Bebop !!!! As a guitar player myself, vicariously, it is a thrill to hear it years later.

Golden Arrow Fleche D’Or was

Recorded 1/30/1952, Paris, 3:00

Personnel included

  • Django on guitar solo
  • Roger Guerin on Trumpet
  • Raymond Fol Piano
  • Hubert Fol as
  • …..and in the rhythm section ……..
  • Barney Spieler b
  • Pierre Lemarchand dm

M14 TROUBLANT BOLERO , or French for “Troubling Bolero” another fine D. Reinhardt composition. TROUBLANT BOLERO starts with an eerie Bass and rhythm guitar line, followed by a muted trumpet melody line, add in the harmony of the alto sax……..then KABOOM, a blazing guitar solo. Just as you get up off the floor from the last solo, Django knocks you over again with this powerful , melodic, finessed guitar solo…again electrified guitar with overdrive…..

TROUBLANT BOLERO was Recorded 1/30/1952, Paris, 3:30

Personnel included

  • Django on guitar solo
  • Roger Guerin on Trumpet
  • Raymond Fol Piano
  • Hubert Fol as
  • …..and again in the rhythm section ……..
  • Barney Spieler b
  • Pierre Lemarchand dm
  • ….And Now…

M15 Nights in the St. Germain-des-Pres , This song, is one of Django’s more obscure “BOP” tunes. But the title tells a great story. The song title refers to a neighborhood in Paris, located around the church of the former Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. This neighborhood was the center of the existentialist movement. There were many cafes, such as Café de Flore, and Les Deux Magots, which hosted French intellectuals during the post-war years and were a rendezvous of the literary and intellectual élite of Paris.

There is one particular cafe in this district, also named St. Germain-des-Pres, that has a rich history in jazz music. During the occupation of Paris by the Nazis, jazz music was outlawed on the airwaves and in public places.The hard-core jazz fans in Paris simply took their music down into the soundproof, underground cellar clubs of St.Germain-des-Pres and the Latin Quarter of Paris. There were many such Clubs such as Les Rats de Cave, The Flore, Les Deux Magots and the Tabou Club.

During the occupation, these were street level cafes by day, and jazz cellars by night. The title of this song comes from the reopening of the infamous club Saint-Germain des-Prés, where at this time, about 1951, Reinhardt was showing off a new sound—his new bebop sound.

Recorded 1/30/1952, Paris

Personnel included

  • Django on guitar solo
  • Roger Guerin on Trumpet
  • Raymond Fol Piano
  • Hubert Fol as
  • …..and again in the rhythm section ……..
  • Barney Spieler b
  • Pierre Lemarchand dm

M16 ANOUMAN. Our next piece is An-ouman, written and recorded in January1953. In this recording session, Maurice Vander plays the piano introduction …on a very out-of-tune instrument …….The song has a sad and beautiful melody …played by Hubert Fol on alto sax.

Perhaps Django had some sense that his time on this earth was very short. Is he looking for strength? The song title may be a reference to a Hindu God named HANUMAN —according to Hindu scripture “Lord Hanuman is the only God of Hindus who will retain his divine power when darkness prevails…..”.

Reinhardt takes the lead mid-song, using a hollow-body electric guitar with reverb, giving a sound that fits well with the smoky, late night alto-sax and piano accompaniment. Beautiful music

Recorded 1/30/1953, Paris. Personnel included

  • Maurice Vander P
  • Hubert Fol as
  • Django on guitar solo
  • Pierre Michelot bass
  • Pierre Lemarchand dm
  • AND NOW….ANOUMAN, composed by Django Reinhardt

M17 D. R. Blues, composed and recorded by Django Reinhardt in 1953 …A short 3-minute, 12-bar blues song, arranged for a quartet format…….

Personnel included

  • Maurice Vander P
  • Django on electric guitar
  • Pierre Michelot bass
  • Pierre Lemarchand dm

M18 DECCAPHONIE

Django’s final recording session took place on April 8th 1953, and it produced this gem…… DECCAPHONIE…..his last composition ….and his last recording committed to wax. He recorded this up-tempo song with……

Personnel included

  • Martial Solal on Piano
  • “Fats” Sadi Lallemand on vibraphone
  • …..and the rhythm section was
  • Pierre Michelot bass
  • Pierre Lemarchand dm
  • PAUSE

The song title….Deccaphonie…. is French for Decca Voice. Many of Django’s recordings were produced on the DECCA label, in the format of the time…..…….these records can be found in 78RPM, 45RPM and LP records, produced from 1939 to 1963. In many, many recordings, it was the DECCA label that gave Django a lasting voice for his work……so the song title DECCAPHONIE seems so appropriate for this song.

Just five weeks after the DECCAPHONIE recording, on May 15th 1953, while walking home from the railway station after playing in a Paris club……Django suffered a massive brain hemorrhage and died shortly thereafter, at home. Django Reinhardt, Gypsy Jazz Guitar Great, was dead at the age of 43.

And so I close out Part II of the Django Reinhardt podcast with this up-tempo, 12-bar improvisation. From April 1953, here is DECCAPHONIE…by Django Reinhardt

May 08 2018 · 49mins
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Gypsy Guitar Django Reinhardt VV-012

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In today’s VINYL VIBRATIONS podcast, I tour some early vinyl records that showcase GYPSY GUITARIST GREAT DJANGO REINHARDT. Many of these will be original compositions by Django Reinhardt . These recordings of Django are found on Vinyl LP Record compilations of his recordings between 1937 and 1949.  Today I will  divide the show into three segments, DJANGO Songs Pre-WW2, Songs During WW2 and Songs after WW2. In all, I will SHOWCASE ten of the great works of GYPSY GUITARIST DJANGO REINHARDT.

  1. When Day is Done (R. Katscher-B. de Sylva), rec 4/22/1937, ____, 3:10 [Capitol-Bluenote Compilation 1996]
  2. Minor Swing (S.Grappelli-D.Reinhardt) , rec 9/9/1937, _____, 3:14 [Capitol-Bluenote Compilation 1996]
  3. Naguine (D. Reinhardt), rec 6/30/1939, Paris, 2:25 [Capitol-Bluenote Compilation 1996]
  4. Djangology (D. Reinhardt), rec 5/8/1942, Brussels, 3:04 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]
  5. Blues Clair (D. Reinhardt), rec 2/26/1943, _______, 3:01 [Capitol-Bluenote Compilation 1996]
  6. Belleville (D. Reinhardt), rec 2/1/1946, London, 3:15 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]
  7. Nuages (D. Reinhardt-J. Larue), rec 2/1/1946, London, 3:15 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]
  8. Swing 48 (D. Reinhardt), rec 7/6/1947, Paris, 2:45 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]
  9. Brick Top (D. Reinhardt-S. Grappelli), rec Feb 1949, Rome, 3:42 [Djangology remaster 1961]
  10. Night and Day (C. Porter), rec 3/10/1953, Paris, 2:51 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]

http://youtu.be/OYX4hQ00zcw

Django Reinhardt, Jean Vaissade – La Caravane – Paris, 20.06.1928

L’Accordéoniste Jean Vaissade –
Jean Vaissade (acc); Django Reinhardt (bj); unknown (slide whistle) –
1928 June 20 – Paris

DJANGO REINHARDT is so well known in Jazz and Guitar circles that perhaps he needs no introduction…. yet there is much cultural and personal background about this fascinating guitarist and his place in music history in the context of world events of the 1940s !!!

Jean Reinhardt, nicknamed “DJANGO, a gipsy word for “I AWAKE”, was born 1/23/1910, in a caravan, in Liberchies, Pont-à-Celles, Belgium, about 60km south of Brussels, into a family of Manouche gypsies. This was just 4 years before the German invasion of Belgium in 1914 and Germany’s declaration of war on France, in WW1.

Starting at age 8, Reinhardt spent most of his youth in Romani, or Gypsy encampments close to Paris, playing banjo, guitar and violin. His brother Joseph Reinhardt, two years younger, was an accomplished guitarist. Django Reinhardt played the violin at first, then at the age of 12, he learned to play a “banjo-guitar”. A banjo-guitar looks like a banjo, and sounds like a banjo, but is tuned like a guitar and can be played by guitarists. By the age of 13, Reinhardt was able to make a living playing music. His first known recording (in June 20, 1928, AGE 18) is of him playing the banjo –guitar with accordianist Jean Vaissade

Not long after this first recording, also when he was 18, Reinhardt was severely injured in a caravan fire. (For those non-europeans, the term “caravan” refers to a small trailer in which one can live while traveling. In the context of 1928 Belgium, these were horse-drawn caravans.)

In this fire, Django received first- and second-degree burns over half his body. His right leg was paralysed and the third and fourth fingers of his left hand were badly burned. He was able to walk within a year with the aid of a cane. And he relearned his guitar-playing skill … even though his third and fourth fingers remained partially paralysed. He played all of his guitar solos with only two fingers, and used the two injured digits for playing chords. This is an amazing fact, when you hear the speed, clarity and musicality of his guitar solos

Between 1929 and 1933 Django abandoned the banjo-guitar for the classical guitar….. Django somehow was able to acquire an extraordinary guitar, a Selmer Maccaferri. This is a large body steel-string, arched-top guitar with a “D”-shaped soundhole and a wide neck, like a classical guitar. The body had an internal resonator, invented circa 1931 by guitarist and luthier [loo-ti’-er] Mario Maccaferri, the resonator wwas designed to increase the volume of the guitar.

In 1934, Reinhardt and Parisian violinist Grappelli were invited to form the “Quintette du Hot Club de France” with Reinhardt’s younger brother Joseph and Roger Chaput on guitar, and Louis Vola on bass. The guitars also served as percussion instruments—-they had no true drums or percussion section. The Quintette du Hot Club de France (or QHCF) jazz ensemble was composed only of STRING instruments.

Today I will  divide the show into three segments, DJANGO Songs Pre-WW2, Songs During WW2 and Songs after WW2. In all, I will SHOWCASE ten of the great works of DJANGO REINHARDT,

In our first segment, we look at three of DJANGO REINHARDT’s SONGS PRE-WW2, defined as the time leading up to September 1939, the invasion of Germany into Poland

M1 When Day is Done (R. Katscher-B. de Sylva), rec 4/22/1937, ____, 3:10 [Capitol-Bluenote Compilation 1996]

When Day is Done performed by Quintette du Hot Club de France recorded in April 1937 with a beautiful octave stle lead-in by Django and a lovely solo intro, followed by a tempo change for stephane grapelli’s violin solo.

Recorded in: 4/22/1937

Personnel of the Quintette du Hot Club de France included

  • Stephanie Grappelli VN
  • Django Reinhardt G
  • Marcel Bianchi RG
  • Pierre Ferret RG
  • Louis Vola B

M2 Minor Swing (S.Grappelli-D.Reinhardt) , rec 9/9/1937, _____, 3:14 [Capitol-Bluenote Compilation 1996]

In Minor Swing we hear the great expression in Django’s lead including fantastic runs up and down the neck.

“Ahhhh Yeah!” THAT WAS Minor Swing (S.Grappelli-D.Reinhardt) ,

Recorded in: rec 9/9/1937

Personnel of the Quintette du Hot Club de France included

  • Stephanie Grappelli VN
  • Django Reinhardt G
  • Joseph Reinhardt RG
  • Eugene Vees RG
  • Pierre Ferret RG
  • Louis Vola B

M3 Naguine (D. Reinhardt), rec 6/30/1939, Paris, 2:25 [Capitol-Bluenote Compilation 1996]

This is a very easy-going solo demonstration of chorded guitar melody, a studio recording from June of 1939. The name of the song, Naguine, is also his second wife’s middle name, Sophie “Naguine” Ziegler, whom he married fours years later, in central France, and with whom he had a son, Babik Reinhardt, who became a respected guitarist in his own right.

  • Personnel Django solo performance

SONGS DURING WAR (1939-1945)

When WWII broke out, (or September 1939) the original quintet was on tour in the United Kingdom. Reinhardt returned to Paris and Grappelli remained in the United Kingdom for the duration of the war (six years, or May 1945). Reinhardt reformed the quintet in Paris, with Hubert Rostaing on clarinet replacing Grappelli’s violin.

Just a few months after returning to Paris, in May of 1940, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands fell to the Nazis. Reinhardt’s problems were compounded by the fact that the Nazis officially disapproved of jazz. Jazz was prohibited by the Nazis at the beginning of the war. The Nazi regime even passed edicts banning jazz records and muted trumpets calling them…. degenerate art!! He made several attempts, unsuccessful, to escape occupied France.

Reinhardt survived the war unscathed, unlike many Gypsies who perished in the Romani holocaust. Nazi Germany, the Independent State of Croatia, the Kindom of Hungary and their allies, attempted to exterminate the Romani people of Europe during World War II…..both Roma and Jews were defined as “enemies of the race-based state” by the Nuremberg laws; ….and the Nazi regime systematically murdered several hundred thousand European Gypsies.

There may be two reasons why Django succeeded in surviving persecution, after all he was living in France and a key musician of “Quintette du Hot Club de France” now for six years. One reason is that Eastern European Romani communities were less organised than Jewish communities, and therefore not well documented. The other reason is that supposedly, Django enjoyed the protection of one jazz-loving Nazi, Luftwaffe officer Dietrich Schulz-Köhn, nicknamed “Doktor Jazz.

Our first wartime song is DJANGOLOGY, recorded in Brussels, May 8, 1942. At this time, Belgium had fallen to the Nazis along with France and the Netherlands, two years earlier. The Battle of Britain had also passed, and Belgium is occupied at this time.

Djangology leads the piece with a brief solo, then the Stan Brenders and Son Grand Orchestra performers are added in, and Django is prominently mixed to be in the front of the orchestra. Note the lack of violinist Stephan Grappelli. He remains in London during the WW2. Here is an early example of jazz guitar with a LEAD role within a large orchestra. The very young jazz guitarist Charlie Christian has died two months earlier in New York.

Without further adieu, Djangology (composed by D. Reinhardt), recorded in 1942

Djangology (D. Reinhardt), from the VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994

Recorded in: Brussels May 8, 1942

  • Personnel Included members of the Stan Brenders and Son Grand Orchestra

M5 Blues Clair (D. Reinhardt), rec 2/26/1943, _______, 3:01 [Capitol-Bluenote Compilation 1996]

Blues Clair is a 12-bar blues format but in a happy major scale and without the commonly used Pentatonic scale of American Blues. Django demonstrates a number of bizaar techniques here, including some fabulous fast-strumming chords , the use of ringing harmonics, and picking strings beyond the guitar bridge. Listen to these strange techniques, all played together, mid song…

We also hear Django’s high paced single-note guitar lead delivery. There is a drum part in this song, not commonly done, in earlier recordings of Quintette du Hot Club de France, the guitar strumming and bass provided all of the percussion.

Recorded in: 1943

Personnel Included

  • Django Reinhardt G
  • Eugene Vees RG
  • Gaston Leonard D
  • Jean Storne B

Now we switch gears and go to SONGS POST WW2. It is now early 1946, eight months after the capture of Berlin by Polish and Soviet forces.

M6 Belleville (D. Reinhardt), rec 2/1/1946, London, 3:15 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]

We start with Belleville, a Django composition. We are back with the Quintette du Hot Club de France and Stephane Grappelli again, recording in LONDON. There are two rhythm guitarists and a bass.

Belleville (D. Reinhardt composition),

Recorded in: London, 1946

Personnel of the Quintette du Hot Club de France with

  • Stephanie Grappelli VN
  • Django Reinhardt G
  • Jack Llewellyn G
  • Alan Hodgkiss G
  • Coleridge Goode B

M7 Nuages (D. Reinhardt-J. Larue), rec 2/1/1946, London, 3:15 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]

Nuages, French for Clouds. Nuages is another jazz standard, it is frequently played and has been reincarnated or emulated in two other songs, for example,

Melancholy Serenade, the theme song of the Jackie Gleason Show, and

Sand, the Hawaiian sounding steel guitar instrumental by Jerry Byrd.

And now the original classic, NUAGES, with a unique guitar introduction, recorded in 1946 in London

Recorded in: 1946 in London

Personnel Included

  • Personnel of the Quintette du Hot Club de France with
  • Stephanie Grappelli VN
  • Django Reinhardt G
  • Jack Llewellyn G
  • Alan Hodgkiss G
  • Coleridge Goode B

M8 Swing 48 (D. Reinhardt), rec 7/6/1947, Paris, 2:45 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]

Next up is SWING 48. Another Django original composition. We are back in Paris now. The personnel have changed. We have Hubert Rostaing on CLARINET, instead of Grappelli on violin. Now DJANGO is performing on ELECTRIC GUITAR. This I different kind of sound all together. Recorded in 1947, Django is BLAZING on guitar. His younger brother Joseph is on rhythm guitar. And we have the jazz drummer Andre Jourdan … Swing 48, composed by Django, performed on an electric / acoustic guitar.

Recorded in: Paris, 1947

  • Personnel of the Quintette du Hot Club de France with
  • Hubert Rostaing CL
  • Django Reinhardt G
  • Joseph Reinhardt G
  • Ladislas Czabanyck B
  • Andre Jourdan D

M9 Brick Top (D. Reinhardt-S. Grappelli), rec Feb 1949, Rome, 3:42 [Djangology remaster 1961]

M10 Night and Day (C. Porter), rec 3/10/1953, Paris, 2:51 [VERVE Jazz Masters Compilation 1994]

Next up is Night and Day (C. Porter), rec 3/10/1953, Paris. In the Django Reinhardt et Ses Rythmes we hear PIANO, DRUM, BASS and GUITAR. In the electric guitar work, we hear a prediction of the sounds of SUSTAIN and DISTORTION effects. For DJANGO, this is both a demonstration of his TECHNICAL PROWESS and wonderful MUSICAL CONTENT. Just two months after this recording, while walking from the Fontainebleau-Avon railway station after playing in a Paris club, he collapsed outside his house from a brain hemorrhage. Reinhardt was declared dead on arrival at the hospital in Fontainebleau at age 43.

Recorded in:Paris, 1953, just two months before Dango’s untimely death in France.

  • Personnel of the Django Reinhardt et Ses Rythmes
  • Django Reinhardt G
  • Maurice Vander P
  • Pierre Michelot B
  • Jean Louis Viale D
May 08 2018 · 56mins
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