OwlTail

Cover image of Erin Hatton

Erin Hatton

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 4 Apr 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment with sociologist Erin Hatton

The Electorette Podcast

Professor Erin Hatton, discusses her book Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment, which explores the world of coerced labor; from prisoner laborers, graduate students, welfare workers, and college athletes, these workforce roles are often under-compensated, or aren't compensated at all, and sometimes face punitive consequences if they leave these labor arrangements. Listen to All Electorette Episodeshttps://www.electorette.com/podcastSupport the ElectoretteRate & Review on iTunes: https://apple.co/2GsfQj4Support Electorette on Patreon for $2/month: http://bit.ly/Electorette-PatreonAlso, if you enjoy the Electorette, please subscribe and leave a 5-star review on iTunes. Also, please spread the word by telling your friends, family and colleagues about The Electorette!Want to support the Electorette so that we can bring you more great episodes? You can help us produce more episodes with just $2/per month on Patreon. Every bit helps! Patreon.com/ElectoretteWANT MORE ELECTORETTE? Follow the Electorette on social media. Electorette Facebook Electorette Instagram Electorette Twitter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

33mins

22 Feb 2021

Episode artwork

Are We Unconsciously Letting Our Bosses Control Us? Dr. Erin Hatton Shines a Light on the Systemic Abuse Through Coercion

MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

What kind of power does your boss have over you? What does it mean, in this pandemic world, to think about the conditions under which we work? Are we even conscious of these conditions? This is what Mark explores today with Professor of Sociology and Author Erin Hatton. While researching her book, “Coerced: Work Under the Threat of Punishment,” Dr. Hatton interviewed four groups of people: prisoners, student athletes, welfare recipients, and graduate students. These groups are extremely different from one another, but they have a similar type of coercion, and that is what Dr. Hatton calls “status coercion,” where their bosses have punitive power over them if they refuse to comply with an order. And as our country is gripped by coronavirus, those people in power have even greater control over their workers, and it is becoming apparent just how many types of workers fall victim to status coercion. Is your boss coercing you? Listen to today’s episode and decide. Executive Producer: Adell Coleman Producer: Brittany Temple Distributor: DCP Entertainment For additional content: makeitplain.comSee acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

38mins

15 Jul 2020

Similar People

Episode artwork

Behind the News: Eric Reinhart and Erin Hatton

Jacobin Radio

Eric Reinhart on jails as COVID-19 spreaders (article here, AER article on pretrial detention here). Then, Erin Hatton on “coerced” workers, from prisoners to grad students.

53mins

23 Jun 2020

Episode artwork

Erin Hatton Stands Up For Coerced Workers

The Boston Podcast

Dave talks with Prof. Erin Hatton, author of COERCED: WORK UNDER THREAT OF PUNISHMENT in which she makes the case that there is a rapidly growing workforce of laborers operating under coercion—without workplace protections and in an environment conducive to abuse.

33mins

5 Jun 2020

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Good Law | Bad Law - Coerced at Work: A Conversation w/ Erin Hatton

Good Law | Bad Law

How are people coerced to work? How do we view “workers”? Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by sociology professor and author, Dr. Erin Hatton, to discuss the issues of coercion, work, power dynamics and imbalance, as well as Dr. Hatton’s new book on the topic and how it relates to today’s COVID-19 pandemic. In today’s episode, Aaron and Erin talk about how power is used, wielded, and abused in the context of work. What do prison laborers, graduate students, welfare workers, and college athletes have in common? Erin argues that they all are part of a growing workforce of coerced laborers. Erin and Aaron explore this in depth, examining the different types of coercion and how these definitions are applied in varying situations. Coerced analyzes these four groups of workers and their experiences that differ from the traditional understanding of “employment.” Erin’s book considers how these groups function differently as their “workplace” offers no standard set of protections and they are subject to intense punitive power, reaching beyond the abilities to simply hire and fire. Throughout her book and today’s conversation, Dr. Hatton contends that coercion is a defining feature of work in America today. How do we return to work as restrictions lift but fear and concern of COVID remain? Aaron and Erin touch on this and more, touching on the subjects of labor/employment laws, social distancing and working remotely, consequences and work relations, laboring and bureaucracy, the notion of meaningful work, as well as the idea of laboring for the monetary gain of others, public assistance, and the importance of training, education, and skill building. As an associate professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo, Dr. Hatton’s research focuses on the sociology of work, while also extending into the fields of social inequality, race and gender, culture, labor, law, and social policy. Erin is also the author of The Temp Economy: From Kelly Girls to Permatemps in Postwar America and is editor of Prison/Work: Labor in the Carceral State; The Temp Economy weaves together gender, race, class, and work in a cultural analysis of the temporary help industry and the rise of the new economy, while Prison/Work is an interdisciplinary volume that examines the multiple and multi-directional intersections between mass incarceration, labor, and employment in the U.S. today. To check out Erin’s new book, Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment, please click here. To learn more about Erin, please visit her website here. Host: Aaron Freiwald Guest: Dr. Erin Hatton Follow Good Law | Bad Law: YouTube: Good Law | Bad Law Facebook: @GOODLAWBADLAW Instagram: @GoodLawBadLaw Website: https://www.law-podcast.com

54mins

29 May 2020

Episode artwork

Erin Hatton, "Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment" (U California Press, 2020)

New Books in Sociology

What do prisoner laborers, graduate students, welfare workers, and college athletes have in common? According to sociologist Erin Hatton, they are all part of a growing workforce of coerced laborers.Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment (University of California Press, 2020) explores this world of coerced labor through an unexpected and compelling comparison of these four groups of workers, for whom a different definition of "employment" reigns supreme—one where workplace protections do not apply and employers wield expansive punitive power, far beyond the ability to hire and fire. Because such arrangements are common across the economy, Hatton argues that coercion—as well as precarity—is a defining feature of work in America today.Theoretically forceful yet vivid and gripping to read, Coerced compels the reader to reevaluate contemporary dynamics of work, pushing beyond concepts like "career" and "gig work." Through this bold analysis, Hatton offers a trenchant window into this world of work from the perspective of those who toil within it—and who are developing the tools needed to push back against it.In this interview, Hatton and I discuss how she chose her unique cases for the book (graduate students, inmates, workfare workers, and college athletes), coercion related to status, agency and resistance, and the often harsh, punitive power of work supervisors and employers. I recommend this book for students, professors, and anyone else interested in labor, social stratification, qualitative methods, and culture.Erin Hatton, PhD, is an associate professor in the SUNY Buffalo Department of Sociology. Professor Hatton’s research focuses on work and political economy, while also extending into the fields of social inequality, labor, law and social policy. You can find her on Twitter at @eehatton.Krystina Millar is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research interests include gender, sociology of the body, and sexuality. You can find her on Twitter at @KrystinaMillar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

51mins

24 Mar 2020

Episode artwork

Erin Hatton, "Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment" (U California Press, 2020)

New Books in Law

What do prisoner laborers, graduate students, welfare workers, and college athletes have in common? According to sociologist Erin Hatton, they are all part of a growing workforce of coerced laborers.Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment (University of California Press, 2020) explores this world of coerced labor through an unexpected and compelling comparison of these four groups of workers, for whom a different definition of "employment" reigns supreme—one where workplace protections do not apply and employers wield expansive punitive power, far beyond the ability to hire and fire. Because such arrangements are common across the economy, Hatton argues that coercion—as well as precarity—is a defining feature of work in America today.Theoretically forceful yet vivid and gripping to read, Coerced compels the reader to reevaluate contemporary dynamics of work, pushing beyond concepts like "career" and "gig work." Through this bold analysis, Hatton offers a trenchant window into this world of work from the perspective of those who toil within it—and who are developing the tools needed to push back against it.In this interview, Hatton and I discuss how she chose her unique cases for the book (graduate students, inmates, workfare workers, and college athletes), coercion related to status, agency and resistance, and the often harsh, punitive power of work supervisors and employers. I recommend this book for students, professors, and anyone else interested in labor, social stratification, qualitative methods, and culture.Erin Hatton, PhD, is an associate professor in the SUNY Buffalo Department of Sociology. Professor Hatton’s research focuses on work and political economy, while also extending into the fields of social inequality, labor, law and social policy. You can find her on Twitter at @eehatton.Krystina Millar is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research interests include gender, sociology of the body, and sexuality. You can find her on Twitter at @KrystinaMillar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

51mins

24 Mar 2020

Episode artwork

Erin Hatton, "Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment" (U California Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

What do prisoner laborers, graduate students, welfare workers, and college athletes have in common? According to sociologist Erin Hatton, they are all part of a growing workforce of coerced laborers.Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment (University of California Press, 2020) explores this world of coerced labor through an unexpected and compelling comparison of these four groups of workers, for whom a different definition of "employment" reigns supreme—one where workplace protections do not apply and employers wield expansive punitive power, far beyond the ability to hire and fire. Because such arrangements are common across the economy, Hatton argues that coercion—as well as precarity—is a defining feature of work in America today.Theoretically forceful yet vivid and gripping to read, Coerced compels the reader to reevaluate contemporary dynamics of work, pushing beyond concepts like "career" and "gig work." Through this bold analysis, Hatton offers a trenchant window into this world of work from the perspective of those who toil within it—and who are developing the tools needed to push back against it.In this interview, Hatton and I discuss how she chose her unique cases for the book (graduate students, inmates, workfare workers, and college athletes), coercion related to status, agency and resistance, and the often harsh, punitive power of work supervisors and employers. I recommend this book for students, professors, and anyone else interested in labor, social stratification, qualitative methods, and culture.Erin Hatton, PhD, is an associate professor in the SUNY Buffalo Department of Sociology. Professor Hatton’s research focuses on work and political economy, while also extending into the fields of social inequality, labor, law and social policy. You can find her on Twitter at @eehatton.Krystina Millar is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research interests include gender, sociology of the body, and sexuality. You can find her on Twitter at @KrystinaMillar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

51mins

24 Mar 2020

Episode artwork

Erin Hatton, "Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment" (U California Press, 2020)

New Books in Education

What do prisoner laborers, graduate students, welfare workers, and college athletes have in common? According to sociologist Erin Hatton, they are all part of a growing workforce of coerced laborers.Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment (University of California Press, 2020) explores this world of coerced labor through an unexpected and compelling comparison of these four groups of workers, for whom a different definition of "employment" reigns supreme—one where workplace protections do not apply and employers wield expansive punitive power, far beyond the ability to hire and fire. Because such arrangements are common across the economy, Hatton argues that coercion—as well as precarity—is a defining feature of work in America today.Theoretically forceful yet vivid and gripping to read, Coerced compels the reader to reevaluate contemporary dynamics of work, pushing beyond concepts like "career" and "gig work." Through this bold analysis, Hatton offers a trenchant window into this world of work from the perspective of those who toil within it—and who are developing the tools needed to push back against it.In this interview, Hatton and I discuss how she chose her unique cases for the book (graduate students, inmates, workfare workers, and college athletes), coercion related to status, agency and resistance, and the often harsh, punitive power of work supervisors and employers. I recommend this book for students, professors, and anyone else interested in labor, social stratification, qualitative methods, and culture.Erin Hatton, PhD, is an associate professor in the SUNY Buffalo Department of Sociology. Professor Hatton’s research focuses on work and political economy, while also extending into the fields of social inequality, labor, law and social policy. You can find her on Twitter at @eehatton.Krystina Millar is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research interests include gender, sociology of the body, and sexuality. You can find her on Twitter at @KrystinaMillar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

51mins

24 Mar 2020