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Kent Beck

25 Podcast Episodes

Latest 17 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

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Digital Transformation Special - EP2 - Kent Beck

Optimizing - Leading Africa's Digital Future

In this special season of our podcast we talk about "Digital Transformation". In this episode Barry Dwolatzky is in conversation with Kent Beck.

16mins

3 May 2022

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Kent Beck

Agile Caravanserai

Kent Beck is an Agile Manifesto author and the co-creator of the wildly popular eXtreme Programming (XP) methodology.  Kent is also the leading proponent of Test-Driven Development (TDD). In the mid-1990s, along with Ron Jeffries and Ward Cunningham, Kent evolved XP on the now-famous Chrysler C3 project.  They proved out extreme discipline with engineering techniques like TDD, refactoring, automated build and test, and pair programming. In parallel, they also deployed a minimalistic set of management practices including the Planning Game, which we know today as Release and Iteration Planning. Kent’s mission, as he puts it, is to “help geeks feel safe in the world.”  Kent anchors it in the belief that we’re all different, but we can and should find common ground. Kent’s work is imbued with inspiration from sources as diverse as art, drama, music and philosophy. Two decades ago, Kent’s book, eXtreme Programming Explained inspired and informed by own journey as a young manager managing XP teams. In those early days, my team scaled XP using a now-forgotten variant of RUP named dX (XP upside down for the insiders). When several of our projects had zero defects in production and satisfied customers as well, believers in XP and agile grew rapidly. Over the years, many of XP’s practices have become widely integrated into Scrum, DevOps and also scaling methods like the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and Disciplined Agile (DA). Those of us working with agile owe Kent, Ron, Ward and other XP proponents a tremendous debt of gratitude for the trail blazing work they’ve done in the past, and that they continue to do today. Today, Kent continues in his mission to make the world a better place, and to make it safe for geeks. Thank you Kent! See more at AgileCaravanserai.com

24mins

26 Jan 2021

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S2: Ep2 - In Conversation with Kent Beck

Optimizing - Leading Africa's Digital Future

Kent Beck is an American software engineer, writer and thought leader. He has been, and remains, one of the most influential figures in the field of software development over the past 20 years. He is best known as the creator of the eXtreme Programming (XP) software development methodology and proponent of Test Driven Development (TDD). In 2001 he was one of 17 signatories of the Agile Manifesto that started a movement which revolutionised the world of software development around the world. He first visited South Africa in 2005 as a guest of the JCSE. This initiated a long association between Kent and the software engineering community of South Africa and Africa.In this episode Kent is in discussion with Prof Barry and his co-host Kerryn Gammie. If life is a relay race, what is the baton he will hand over to Kerryn and her generation of Africa’s future digital leaders.

1hr 21mins

22 Sep 2020

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Explore, Expand, and Extract with 3X Thinking ft. Kent Beck

Streaming Audio: Apache Kafka® & Real-Time Data

As a programmer, Kent Beck chats about various topics of broad interest to developers, including some of his books: “Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change,” “Test-Driven Development: By Example,” and “Implementation Patterns.” He wrote “Implementation Patterns” to highlight the positive habits a developer should form in order to write accessible code. He also shares about what it’s like to experiment with new ideas and implement them, especially when others doubt what you're trying to achieve. This relates to the concept behind the explore-to-expand transition and a short piece he wrote titled "Idea to Impact." Finally, Tim and Kent talk through the difference between refactoring and tidying, Kent's involvement with agile software and test-driven development, and what exactly test-commit-revert is. And yes, they talk a little bit about event streaming too!EPISODE LINKSExtreme Programming Explained: Embrace ChangeTest-Driven Development: By ExampleSmalltalk Best Practice PatternsImplementation PatternsOh, the Methods You’ll Compose (inspired by “Implementation Patterns”)Idea to ImpactFast/Slow in 3X: Explore/Expand/ExtractRefactoring: Improving the Design of Existing CodeNominalism and RealismRobert Mathus, W.V.O. Quine, and ThanosJoin the Confluent Community Slack

54mins

25 Mar 2020

Most Popular

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Episode 180: Extreme Programming & 3X Explained with Kent Beck

The Agile Revolution

Craig and Tony are at YOW! Conference in Brisbane and have a rockstar moment and catchup with Kent Beck, the creator of Extreme Programming, the pioneer of xUnit and author of numerous books including “Extreme Programming Explained” and “Test Driven Development“: Extreme Programming (XP) was born at Chrysler by letting go of conventional wisdom and … Continue reading →

20 Feb 2020

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032 - Test Desiderata with Kent Beck and Kelly Sutton

Code with Jason

I talk with Kent Beck and Kelly Sutton about their recent video series, Test Desiderata.Kent Beck's Test Desiderata postKent Beck's YouTube videosKent Beck on TwitterKelly Sutton on Twitter

51mins

18 Feb 2020

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Talking Agile and Test Principles with Kent Beck - Episode 12

What the Dev?

In this week's episode, we talk to Kent Beck, the first signer of the Agile Manifesto and Software Fellow and Engineering Coach at Gusto, about the latest in Agile practices and about the best programmer test principles. 

20mins

10 Dec 2019

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Facebook Engineering Process with Kent Beck

Business and Philosophy

Kent Beck is a legendary figure in the world of software engineering.  Kent was an early advocate of Test-Driven Development (TDD), and popularized the idea of writing unit tests before writing code that would satisfy those unit tests. A unit test isolates and tests a small piece of functionality within a large piece of software. Practitioners of Test-Driven Development write tens or hundreds of tests in order to cover a large variety of cases that could potentially occur within their software. When Kent Beck joined Facebook in 2011, he was 50 years old and thought he had seen everything in the software industry. During Facebook Boot Camp, Kent started to realize that Facebook was very different than any other company he had seen. Facebook Boot Camp is the six-week onboarding process that every new hire learns about the software practices of the company. After graduating Facebook Boot Camp, Kent began to explore Facebook’s codebase and culture. He found himself rethinking many of the tenets of software engineering that he had previously thought were immutable. Kent joins the show to discuss his time at Facebook, and how the company’s approach to building and scaling products thoroughly reshaped his beliefs about software engineering. Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com ANNOUNCEMENTS Check out our active companies and projects: FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com. The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes. The post Facebook Engineering Process with Kent Beck appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

50mins

28 Aug 2019

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Facebook Engineering Process with Kent Beck

Software Daily

Kent Beck is a legendary figure in the world of software engineering. Kent was an early advocate of Test-Driven Development (TDD), and popularized the idea of writing unit tests before writing code that would satisfy those unit tests. A unit test isolates and tests a small piece of functionality within a large piece of software. Practitioners of Test-Driven Development write tens or hundreds of tests in order to cover a large variety of cases that could potentially occur within their software.When Kent Beck joined Facebook in 2011, he was 50 years old and thought he had seen everything in the software industry. During Facebook Boot Camp, Kent started to realize that Facebook was very different than any other company he had seen. Facebook Boot Camp is the six-week onboarding process that every new hire learns about the software practices of the company.After graduating Facebook Boot Camp, Kent began to explore Facebook’s codebase and culture. He found himself rethinking many of the tenets of software engineering that he had previously thought were immutable.Kent joins the show to discuss his time at Facebook, and how the company’s approach to building and scaling products thoroughly reshaped his beliefs about software engineering.

28 Aug 2019

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Exploring Uncertainty with Kent Beck

Unlearn

Kent Beck is a third-generation geek. His grandfather was a radio geek, his father, an electrical engineer, moved to Silicon Valley in the 60s, and Kent and his father built their first personal computer together. He’s the creator of Extreme Programming, alphabetically the first signer of the Agile Manifesto and most recently helped Facebook scale their engineering organization from 700 to 5,000 people. Helping geeks feel safe in the world. This is one of Kent’s creeds, and as a third-generation geek, he’s looking to help the fourth generation.As a mentor, he encourages younger programmers not to worry so much about finding their purpose from the beginning; instead, they need to get out there and try things, investing in new experiences, then connect the dots later. And feeling scared has two sides: some situations feel scarier than they need to feel, and others should feel scary. Knowing the difference – and how to handle each – is key. Kent shares the story of how, on a consulting gig, he realized that one small tweak—rearranging furniture—was more important than sharing his virtuoso programming skills. The corner office executives were literally sitting in the wrong place. This lesson, Kent recalls, was the beginning of the course change that led to Extreme Programming.Extreme Programming. Kent started by considering a conventional belief: programmers couldn’t be trusted to test their own code. So he began experimenting with ways to challenge that belief with automated testing. But there was a deeper disruption Kent had in mind: programmers being responsible for their own mistakes and for fixing them in real time. He and Barry dive deeper into what that really means, and how it resulted in the Extreme Programming framework and more. The truth about courage and innovation Despite what people say to and about him, Kent doesn’t believe he’s courageous or innovative. Instead, he feels that he’s just doing what he senses needs to be done. Instead of over-analyzing and worrying if he’s got a perfectly formed idea, he starts trying it out. This is what Barry calls a ‘bias of action,’ and they dive into Kent’s way of behaving that makes him stand out. He has several habits to help him learn, and unlearn—fast; the first of those is to reverse and test any sentence that starts with ‘obviously.’ The second is to ask, “Can we try this?” Kent shares some practical applications of how he works and a few more habits and systems you can use in your own work. Cycling through ideas. Cycling through ideas as quickly as possible is another strategy Kent uses to innovate, and he shares how he tends to make small changes quickly to see how effective they’ll be. And more importantly, how easy they will be to roll back if they don’t work. He explains his latest concept of, Test & Commit || Revert. And Barry and Kent talk about how this principle applies not just to programming but can be used to launch new products, improve systems of work and entire organizations. What’s next for Kent? The impossible: he’s setting out to discover how to scale software collaboration beyond what people believe is sensible. Specifically, how to have software application with 100,000 engineerings, each deploying over a 1,000 deployments times a day.Resources for Kent Beck: Website | LinkedIn | Twitter | Books on Amazon | Agile Manifesto | Test && Committ || Revert

53mins

24 Apr 2019

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