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Scott Sharrard Podcasts

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16 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Scott Sharrard. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Scott Sharrard, often where they are interviewed.

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16 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Scott Sharrard. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Scott Sharrard, often where they are interviewed.

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Scott Sharrard - Souther Roots Licks & Creative Approaches Guitar Lessons, Performance & Interview

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Scott Sharrard talks about his Souther Roots Licks & Creative Approaches guitar lessons available on TrueFire, performs, and answers questions. To learn more and watch the video from this live session, please visit truefire.com/live.

About Scott:

Scott Sharrard is best known as lead guitarist and bandleader to the late Gregg Allman. But his personal artistic journey – which includes singing, songwriting, producing and arranging – began long before he first teamed up with the rock icon.

It’s a mission that resumes with “Saving Grace,” Sharrard’s fifth [or sixth?] album -- and his first since Allman’s death.

“Gregg had a pure passion and heart,” Sharrard says of his friend, “especially when it came to being a musician. That authenticity and dedication is a daily inspiration, and I will always carry that with me onstage and in the studio.”

“Saving Grace,” with the blues at its core, bears a distinctly southern spirit, seamlessly assimilating the sounds of American roots music that Sharrard has long embraced. Sessions took place in Memphis and at the historic FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Half the album employs the Hi Rhythm Section, the other The Swampers of Muscle Shoals.

“These guys are legends and heroes of ours who have played on so many life-changing records,” Sharrard says. “This record was steeped in the best the South has to offer. We cut the rhythm section and lead vocals all live on the floor, direct to tape. Old school. We let the songs and the band speak. We also had some of the best barbecue and soul food you could ever imagine, and a lot of laughs and good times with our heroes. How can you lose?”

‘All those cats schooled me…’

Sharrard’s travels to the heart of the American South began in his native Milwaukee. He was born December 28, 1976 – the day his hero Freddie King died – and was a club fixture in Brewtown long before he could legally take a drink.

“Milwaukee at that time was an oasis for a whole group of musical masters,” Sharrard recalls. “Mel Rhyne, Buddy Miles, Hubert Sumlin, Luther Allison, Clyde Stubblefield… They were our local bar bands! All those cats schooled me in different ways, backstage, on gigs and at jams.”

Sharrard was 15 when his father took him to a local blues joint called the Up and Under Pub. There he sat in with singer/guitarist (and local one-named legend) Stokes, who would become his mentor. Another was powerhouse “Chitlin’ Circuit” singer and guitarist Willie Higgins.

Sharrard soon graduated to occasional dates in Chicago, with tutelage coming via jams alongside two fabled Muddy Waters sidemen, drummer Willie “Big Eyes” Smith and pianist Pinetop Perkins.

Big Apple, not Big Easy

Then came a chance 1996 move to New York City. The 20-year-old Sharrard, eager to bolt Milwaukee, had his mind on New Orleans. But his friend Sean Dixon, with whom he had a band called The Chesterfields, had found a rent-controlled apartment in the East Village.

“That settled it,” Sharrard remembers with a laugh. “I became a New York City resident for the first time. My next-door neighbor was Allen Ginsberg, who was already one of my literary heroes at that time. I used to eat at Mee’s Chinese restaurant sitting across from Allen. It was our corner restaurant with a cheap dinner special. He’d always order the ginger fish and write! … It was like a dream, really. All those giant buildings spreading into infinity. It was so overwhelming.”

Sharrard had been in the Big Apple but a year when he met iconic Atlantic Records executive Ahmet Ertegun, who mentored The Chesterfields and gave the young guitar-slinger some sage advice.

“Ahmet told me that you must do it all – and well – if you want to survive as a musician,” Sharrard remembers. “He told me to get it all together: writing, singing, producing, playing, arranging. He convinced me to work twice as hard because around 2000 he saw the end of the music business as we knew it. He felt no one was around to support artists like back in the heyday of the Fifties, Sixties and Seventies.”

The Chesterfields cut three albums and toured nationally before Sharrard began to chart his own course. A series of releases followed, including “Dawnbreaker” (2005), “Analog/Monolog” (2008) and “Ante Up” (2009).

Ertegun wasn’t the only legend with Sharrard on his radar back then: The young guitarist also forged a relationship with Levon Helm – performing with The Band drummer about a dozen times, including his final gig just before his death in April of 2012.

Sharrard remains close with Helm’s daughter, Amy, and a host of other artists on the Woodstock scene.

Preparation meets opportunity

It was through Amy’s then-husband, multi-instrumentalist Jay Collins – already a member of Allman’s band – that Sharrard embarked on the collaboration of a lifetime. In the fall of 2008, Sharrard began a nearly decade-long run with the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer.

“I grew up on the music of the Allman Brothers,” says Sharrard. “I consider first hearing them to be the ‘Big Bang’ moment for me as a pre-teen. I’ve always been chasing what I like to call ‘Real Rock and Roll,’ a blend of blues, jazz, soul, country and folk – with the central goal being to create an original sound of your own. In that respect, working with Gregg just solidified everything I’ve believed since I was a kid.”

Sharrard joined the Gregg Allman Band as a touring guitarist and later became Musical Director.

The fruitful partnership ended with the 69-year-old Allman’s death on May 27, 2017. But not before Allman covered Sharrard’s “Love Like Kerosene” on 2015’s “Gregg Allman Live: Back to Macon, GA,” and again on Allman’s eighth and final solo album, the posthumous, GRAMMY-nominated “Southern Blood” (Rounder Records, 2017).

Another “Southern Blood” track, the unforgettable farewell “My Only True Friend” – co-written by Sharrard and Allman – earned a GRAMMY nomination for Americana Song of the Year.

Sharrard’s deep respect for Allman factored heavily into the 2018 release date for “Saving Grace.” Tracking was completed in December of 2016. But Sharrard – knowing Allman’s health was failing and that “Southern Blood” would be his last hurrah – chose to delay its unveiling.

He’s now begun a new chapter with an album he consciously wanted to summarize the last 20 years of his work – and one that showcases the totality of his artistry: as guitarist, singer, songwriter, producer, arranger and bandleader.

In short, he says, it’s rock n’ roll rooted in everything else.

“I basically have a rock ’n’ roll band,” Sharrard explains. “When I was growing up, I loved bands like Little Feat, Led Zeppelin and the Allmans. They would explore so many styles and experiment. That’s something I have always tried to embrace, and that’s how I want to present my music today. This is what I tried to do with Gregg. Now I’m continuing that as a solo artist.”

Scott has recently joined the legendary band Little Feat as a guitarist/vocalist. He will be releasing his 6th solo album in Spring 2020.
Sep 04 2020 · 1hr 17mins
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Scott Sharrard - Southern Roots Guitar Lessons, Performances, & Interview

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Scott Sharrard discusses his Southern Roots guitar lessons available on TrueFire, performs, and answers questions. To learn more and watch the video from this live session, please visit truefire.com/live.

About Scott: Scott Sharrard is best known as lead guitarist and bandleader to the late Gregg Allman. But his personal artistic journey – which includes singing, songwriting, producing and arranging – began long before he first teamed up with the rock icon.

It’s a mission that resumes with “Saving Grace,” Sharrard’s fifth [or sixth?] album -- and his first since Allman’s death.

“Gregg had a pure passion and heart,” Sharrard says of his friend, “especially when it came to being a musician. That authenticity and dedication is a daily inspiration, and I will always carry that with me onstage and in the studio.”

“Saving Grace,” with the blues at its core, bears a distinctly southern spirit, seamlessly assimilating the sounds of American roots music that Sharrard has long embraced. Sessions took place in Memphis and at the historic FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Half the album employs the Hi Rhythm Section, the other The Swampers of Muscle Shoals.

“These guys are legends and heroes of ours who have played on so many life-changing records,” Sharrard says. “This record was steeped in the best the South has to offer. We cut the rhythm section and lead vocals all live on the floor, direct to tape. Old school. We let the songs and the band speak. We also had some of the best barbecue and soul food you could ever imagine, and a lot of laughs and good times with our heroes. How can you lose?”

‘All those cats schooled me…’

Sharrard’s travels to the heart of the American South began in his native Milwaukee. He was born December 28, 1976 – the day his hero Freddie King died – and was a club fixture in Brewtown long before he could legally take a drink.

“Milwaukee at that time was an oasis for a whole group of musical masters,” Sharrard recalls. “Mel Rhyne, Buddy Miles, Hubert Sumlin, Luther Allison, Clyde Stubblefield… They were our local bar bands! All those cats schooled me in different ways, backstage, on gigs and at jams.”

Sharrard was 15 when his father took him to a local blues joint called the Up and Under Pub. There he sat in with singer/guitarist (and local one-named legend) Stokes, who would become his mentor. Another was powerhouse “Chitlin’ Circuit” singer and guitarist Willie Higgins.

Sharrard soon graduated to occasional dates in Chicago, with tutelage coming via jams alongside two fabled Muddy Waters sidemen, drummer Willie “Big Eyes” Smith and pianist Pinetop Perkins.

Big Apple, not Big Easy

Then came a chance 1996 move to New York City. The 20-year-old Sharrard, eager to bolt Milwaukee, had his mind on New Orleans. But his friend Sean Dixon, with whom he had a band called The Chesterfields, had found a rent-controlled apartment in the East Village.

“That settled it,” Sharrard remembers with a laugh. “I became a New York City resident for the first time. My next-door neighbor was Allen Ginsberg, who was already one of my literary heroes at that time. I used to eat at Mee’s Chinese restaurant sitting across from Allen. It was our corner restaurant with a cheap dinner special. He’d always order the ginger fish and write! … It was like a dream, really. All those giant buildings spreading into infinity. It was so overwhelming.”

Sharrard had been in the Big Apple but a year when he met iconic Atlantic Records executive Ahmet Ertegun, who mentored The Chesterfields and gave the young guitar-slinger some sage advice.

“Ahmet told me that you must do it all – and well – if you want to survive as a musician,” Sharrard remembers. “He told me to get it all together: writing, singing, producing, playing, arranging. He convinced me to work twice as hard because around 2000 he saw the end of the music business as we knew it. He felt no one was around to support artists like back in the heyday of the Fifties, Sixties and Seventies.”

The Chesterfields cut three albums and toured nationally before Sharrard began to chart his own course. A series of releases followed, including “Dawnbreaker” (2005), “Analog/Monolog” (2008) and “Ante Up” (2009).

Ertegun wasn’t the only legend with Sharrard on his radar back then: The young guitarist also forged a relationship with Levon Helm – performing with The Band drummer about a dozen times, including his final gig just before his death in April of 2012.

Sharrard remains close with Helm’s daughter, Amy, and a host of other artists on the Woodstock scene.

Preparation meets opportunity

It was through Amy’s then-husband, multi-instrumentalist Jay Collins – already a member of Allman’s band – that Sharrard embarked on the collaboration of a lifetime. In the fall of 2008, Sharrard began a nearly decade-long run with the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer.

“I grew up on the music of the Allman Brothers,” says Sharrard. “I consider first hearing them to be the ‘Big Bang’ moment for me as a pre-teen. I’ve always been chasing what I like to call ‘Real Rock and Roll,’ a blend of blues, jazz, soul, country and folk – with the central goal being to create an original sound of your own. In that respect, working with Gregg just solidified everything I’ve believed since I was a kid.”

Sharrard joined the Gregg Allman Band as a touring guitarist and later became Musical Director.

The fruitful partnership ended with the 69-year-old Allman’s death on May 27, 2017. But not before Allman covered Sharrard’s “Love Like Kerosene” on 2015’s “Gregg Allman Live: Back to Macon, GA,” and again on Allman’s eighth and final solo album, the posthumous, GRAMMY-nominated “Southern Blood” (Rounder Records, 2017).

Another “Southern Blood” track, the unforgettable farewell “My Only True Friend” – co-written by Sharrard and Allman – earned a GRAMMY nomination for Americana Song of the Year.

Sharrard’s deep respect for Allman factored heavily into the 2018 release date for “Saving Grace.” Tracking was completed in December of 2016. But Sharrard – knowing Allman’s health was failing and that “Southern Blood” would be his last hurrah – chose to delay its unveiling.

He’s now begun a new chapter with an album he consciously wanted to summarize the last 20 years of his work – and one that showcases the totality of his artistry: as guitarist, singer, songwriter, producer, arranger and bandleader.

In short, he says, it’s rock n’ roll rooted in everything else.

“I basically have a rock ’n’ roll band,” Sharrard explains. “When I was growing up, I loved bands like Little Feat, Led Zeppelin and the Allmans. They would explore so many styles and experiment. That’s something I have always tried to embrace, and that’s how I want to present my music today. This is what I tried to do with Gregg. Now I’m continuing that as a solo artist.”

Scott has recently joined the legendary band Little Feat as a guitarist/vocalist. He will be releasing his 6th solo album in Spring 2020.
May 24 2020 · 1hr 26mins

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Scott Sharrard

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New York-based songwriter and guitar player Scott Sharrard shares his story with Amy Wright at the DittyTV Studios in Downtown Memphis. Sharrard is widely known as the lead guitarist and musical director of the Gregg Allman Band.

Recorded Nov. 2018

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

May 20 2020 · 19mins
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Scott Sharrard (Gregg Allman, Little Feat)

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Best known for his musical partnership with Gregg Allman, Scott has also led a very impressive solo career.  We talk about how music has followed him around his whole life and how he ended up playing in one of his all time favorite bands, Little Feat. A must listen for any guitar fans!

Make sure to check out our Spotify playlist that features every song discussed on the show: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4woCFOUuh02lbsNetoi1lA?si=viLNtA4IQzOpmzJzKsYHSw

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/songsthatsavedme?fan_landing=true)

Apr 22 2020 · 40mins
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Episode 43 - Scott Sharrard

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Our guest for Episode 43 is Grammy-nominated guitarist Scott Sharrard.   Scott is a returning guest for the Podcast, having previously joined us for Episode 10.  

I always enjoy talking music with Scott, he is one of the most knowledgeable people around when it comes to American music history as you will hear throughout our conversation.  During this episode you will hear Scott talk about:

  • The evolution of the recording industry
  • Some of the albums that changed Scott’s life musically
  • The roots of American music
  • Having the opportunity to open for Sting
  • Scott’s take on music education and preserving roots music as an art form
  • Working with legends Taj Mahal and Bernard Purdie on a song (Everything a Good Man Needs) on the Saving Grace album

You can learn more about Scott by checking out his website www.scottsharrard.com or follow him on Instagram @scott.sharrard.  And if you haven’t already listened to his album Saving Grace, please give it a listen.

As always remember to subscribe to the podcast, and also leave a rating and review on your preferred podcast platform if you like what you hear.

Sep 24 2019 · 57mins
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Bar Chord Presents Musicians Talking Music - Scott Sharrard

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Mike Cobb sits down for a freewheeling interview with Scott Sharrard, an NYC based guitar master and former musical director of the Gregg Allman Band.
Jun 21 2019 · 36mins
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#2307 - The Scott Sharrard Band feat. Rev. Charles Hodges

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This week on Beale Street Caravan we feature Scott Sharrard as he marks the release of his new studio effort, Saving Grace. Produced in Memphis, TN and in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, Saving Grace has Scott backed by legendary studio musicians from each city, including Memphis’ own Hi Rhythm section. We’ll hear Scott along with Rev. Charles Hodges in a performance captured at Railgarten, smack dab in the middle of Midtown Memphis. Later in the program we get to sit down and catch up with Scott.Grammy nominated blues man, Guy Davis, will be with us to deliver an installment of the Blues Hall of Fame, an exploration of the lives of the pioneers and innovators enshrined in the Blues Hall of Fame, here in Memphis, TN, brought to you by the Blues Foundation.

Nov 26 2018 · 58mins
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Episode 136: Scott Sharrard

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Since Gregg Allman’s unfortunate passing, Scott Sharrard has found himself at a crossroads between hanging on to his love and work with Gregg, and getting on with his own career. Luckily for us, he will be releasing his first solo record in quite some time but his fifth thus far, September 21st, Saving Grace, and I can tell you its a gorgeous blues, soul and R&B record with standout slide guitar playing and passionate vocals. For more on Scott’s work visit scottsharrard.com and make sure you get your ears on Saving Grace and see Scott at one of his various dates.



Show Notes:

First Song: 00:45 – Everything a Good Man Needs

Interview Begins: 05:42

Extro Song: 35:45 - Angeline

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sep 18 2018 · 40mins
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EP39: Scott Sharrard l Gregg Allman's lead guitarist

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Hey Guys!


This week's silent giant is Grammy nominated singer-songwriter Scott Sharrard. As well as being a solo musical artist Scott is most known for his role as a long time collaborator for rock and roll legend Gregg Allman. Scott worked alongside Gregg as his lead guitarist, song collaborator and musical director for years.


In this interview he sits down to chat about his upbringing in Michigan, how he got into music, how he met Gregg Allman, being nominated for a Grammy, cowriting Gregg's last musical composition before he passed away and whole lot more!


______________________________________________


FOLLOW SCOTT ON INSTAGRAM


FOLLOW COREY ON INSTAGRAM


FOLLOW SILENT GIANTS ON INSTAGRAM


_______________________________________________


This episode of Silent Giants was mixed by Mark Byrd of MBM Studios.


See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 07 2018 · 1hr 5mins
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Episode 10 - Scott Sharrard

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Joining us for Episode 10 is Grammy-nominated musician Scott Sharrard.  Besides being a talented guitarist and musician, Scott has had some amazing opportunities to play with heroes of American blues and rock and roll.  The list of legendary musicians we touch on during this interview is too long to capture in its entirety here, but includes Jimi Hendrix, Gregg Allman, Duane Allman, and Hubert Sumlin, just to name a few...

Please remember to subscribe to the podcast, and do leave a rating and review on your preferred podcast platform if you enjoy the interviews on The Music Chat Podcast.

Mar 29 2018 · 1hr 4mins
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