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John Weber

16 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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MCA on the ARTS: Diane Frankel speaks with Amy Gilman and John Weber

MCA on the ARTS

MCA Senior Consultant Diane Frankel talks with museum directors Amy Gilman of the Chazen Museum of Art at the University Wisconsin-Madison and John Weber of the University of Oregon’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art about what COVID-19 has meant to university based art museums.

42mins

3 Jun 2020

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We Are Still Champions - Talking High School Baseball and Softball with Cypress High Head Coaches, John Weber and Kevin Dull

Gagnation - Adventures in Music, Sports, Enterprise, and Leisure

For the first time, coming live from "The Garage", the unofficial Cypress Athletics Hall of Fame.   JD Defazo gives us an overview of the legendary garage before we dive into the show.  This episode is released on the one year anniversary (May 18, 2019) of  Cypress High School pulling off the double championship where both Baseball and Softball won the Southern Section CIF titles.  Baseball was also named the USA Today National Champions and Head Coach John Weber earned the National Coach of the Year award.  Coach Weber and Softball Head Coach Kevin Dull join The Gag and talk about that memorable championship day.   But we also focus on the current year and the drama surrounding the Covid-19 nightmare and how it has impacted their squads.  These coaches had to go from generals on the field to leaders off the field in a heartbeat, helping their young men and women get through the tough times.     

35mins

18 May 2020

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Ep 16 | John Weber

The Peak Results Academy Podcast

During this episode, Rich speaks with John Weber of Royal LePage First Contact Realty about how he uses an often overlooked marketing strategy to garner 25-30% of his business, what he thinks are the 3  necessary requirements for making a name in real estate and why mindset is the key to getting through financially challenging times. John also shares some timeless advice from his entrepreneurial father, the founder of a cottage country staple for burgers, Webers.SubscribeDon’t miss out on more great episodes! Listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, YouTube and more!Show Notes[02:28] About John[05:45] John shares how he got started on his real estate journey[08:35] The marketing tool that gives him 25-30% of his business[13:00] How mindset was the key for challenging 6 months with no commission[16:10] Exploring COVID-19 and best practices during this time[20:30] The top 3 requirements for making a name in business[26:35] Desire as a driver[30:15] Timeless advice from John’s father[32:30] Exploring options for a new agent entering real estate[40:00] Actionable advice for weathering this storm[52:50] How to get in touch with JohnContact JohnEmail: john@weberteam.caPhone: 705-727-6111Website: www.weberteam.caAbout JohnSince 2008, John Weber or Royal LePage First Contact Realty has created a thriving boutique real estate team in Simcoe County, ranking among the top 2% of real estate agents for Royal LePage. Having grown up in an entrepreneurial family (John’s dad created the epic burger stop, Webers, on Highway 11), John tackles his business with an eye towards customer satisfaction and business know-how.

46mins

14 May 2020

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Get Down To Business with Shalom Klein – 3/12/2017 – Sheldon Helfgot, Hollie Fagan and John Weber

Get Down To Business with Shalom Klein

Join Shalom Klein on his weekly radio show, Get Down To Business with guests: Sheldon Helfgot Hollie Fagan John Weber

54mins

23 Mar 2020

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John Weber, "From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century" (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in Latino Studies

John Weber, Assistant Professor of History at Old Dominion University, discusses his book, From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century(University of North Carolina Press, 2015), migrant agricultural labor, immigration policy, and the long-term impacts of the labor relations model that developed in South Texas during the early twentieth century.In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale agriculture, became one of the United States' most lucrative farming regions and one of its worst places to work. By encouraging mass migration from Mexico, paying low wages, selectively enforcing immigration restrictions, toppling older political arrangements, and periodically immobilizing the workforce, growers created a system of labor controls unique in its levels of exploitation.Ethnic Mexican residents of South Texas fought back by organizing and by leaving, migrating to destinations around the United States where employers eagerly hired them--and continued to exploit them. In From South Texas to the Nation, John Weber reinterprets the United States' record on human and labor rights. This important book illuminates the way in which South Texas pioneered the low-wage, insecure, migration-dependent labor system on which so many industries continue to depend.Beth A. English is director of the Liechtenstein Institute's Project on Gender in the Global Community at Princeton University. She also is a past president of the Southern Labor History Association. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latino-studies

40mins

20 Mar 2020

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John Weber, "From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century" (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in the American South

John Weber, Assistant Professor of History at Old Dominion University, discusses his book, From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century(University of North Carolina Press, 2015), migrant agricultural labor, immigration policy, and the long-term impacts of the labor relations model that developed in South Texas during the early twentieth century.In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale agriculture, became one of the United States' most lucrative farming regions and one of its worst places to work. By encouraging mass migration from Mexico, paying low wages, selectively enforcing immigration restrictions, toppling older political arrangements, and periodically immobilizing the workforce, growers created a system of labor controls unique in its levels of exploitation.Ethnic Mexican residents of South Texas fought back by organizing and by leaving, migrating to destinations around the United States where employers eagerly hired them--and continued to exploit them. In From South Texas to the Nation, John Weber reinterprets the United States' record on human and labor rights. This important book illuminates the way in which South Texas pioneered the low-wage, insecure, migration-dependent labor system on which so many industries continue to depend.Beth A. English is director of the Liechtenstein Institute's Project on Gender in the Global Community at Princeton University. She also is a past president of the Southern Labor History Association.Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

40mins

20 Mar 2020

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John Weber, "From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century" (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in American Studies

John Weber, Assistant Professor of History at Old Dominion University, discusses his book, From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century(University of North Carolina Press, 2015), migrant agricultural labor, immigration policy, and the long-term impacts of the labor relations model that developed in South Texas during the early twentieth century.In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale agriculture, became one of the United States' most lucrative farming regions and one of its worst places to work. By encouraging mass migration from Mexico, paying low wages, selectively enforcing immigration restrictions, toppling older political arrangements, and periodically immobilizing the workforce, growers created a system of labor controls unique in its levels of exploitation.Ethnic Mexican residents of South Texas fought back by organizing and by leaving, migrating to destinations around the United States where employers eagerly hired them--and continued to exploit them. In From South Texas to the Nation, John Weber reinterprets the United States' record on human and labor rights. This important book illuminates the way in which South Texas pioneered the low-wage, insecure, migration-dependent labor system on which so many industries continue to depend.Beth A. English is director of the Liechtenstein Institute's Project on Gender in the Global Community at Princeton University. She also is a past president of the Southern Labor History Association. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

40mins

20 Mar 2020

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John Weber, "From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century" (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in the American West

John Weber, Assistant Professor of History at Old Dominion University, discusses his book, From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century(University of North Carolina Press, 2015), migrant agricultural labor, immigration policy, and the long-term impacts of the labor relations model that developed in South Texas during the early twentieth century.In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale agriculture, became one of the United States' most lucrative farming regions and one of its worst places to work. By encouraging mass migration from Mexico, paying low wages, selectively enforcing immigration restrictions, toppling older political arrangements, and periodically immobilizing the workforce, growers created a system of labor controls unique in its levels of exploitation.Ethnic Mexican residents of South Texas fought back by organizing and by leaving, migrating to destinations around the United States where employers eagerly hired them--and continued to exploit them. In From South Texas to the Nation, John Weber reinterprets the United States' record on human and labor rights. This important book illuminates the way in which South Texas pioneered the low-wage, insecure, migration-dependent labor system on which so many industries continue to depend.Beth A. English is director of the Liechtenstein Institute's Project on Gender in the Global Community at Princeton University. She also is a past president of the Southern Labor History Association. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

40mins

20 Mar 2020

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John Weber, "From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century" (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in History

John Weber, Assistant Professor of History at Old Dominion University, discusses his book, From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century(University of North Carolina Press, 2015), migrant agricultural labor, immigration policy, and the long-term impacts of the labor relations model that developed in South Texas during the early twentieth century.In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale agriculture, became one of the United States' most lucrative farming regions and one of its worst places to work. By encouraging mass migration from Mexico, paying low wages, selectively enforcing immigration restrictions, toppling older political arrangements, and periodically immobilizing the workforce, growers created a system of labor controls unique in its levels of exploitation.Ethnic Mexican residents of South Texas fought back by organizing and by leaving, migrating to destinations around the United States where employers eagerly hired them--and continued to exploit them. In From South Texas to the Nation, John Weber reinterprets the United States' record on human and labor rights. This important book illuminates the way in which South Texas pioneered the low-wage, insecure, migration-dependent labor system on which so many industries continue to depend.Beth A. English is director of the Liechtenstein Institute's Project on Gender in the Global Community at Princeton University. She also is a past president of the Southern Labor History Association. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

40mins

20 Mar 2020

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UO Today With John Weber

UO Today

John Weber, Executive Director of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, discusses his Oregon roots and his aspirations for the museum. Weber took over as Executive Director on October 1, 2019 after Jill Hartz retired.

27mins

27 Nov 2019

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