OwlTail

Cover image of Jacob Zuma

Jacob Zuma

22 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Jul 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Jacob Zuma’s presidency: When it started going off the rails? Feeding the masses in the age of a pandemic and increasing unemployment.

The Money Show

Adriaan Basson, editor-in-chief at News24 analysis Jacob Zuma’s presidency, legacy and when it started going off the rails. Andy Du Plessis, Managing Director of FoodForward SA talk to Bruce Whitfield about the challenges of a food scheme programme in the middle of a pandemic and high unemploymentSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1hr 19mins

8 Jul 2021

Episode artwork

Jacob Zuma defies Constitutional Court order

The Clement Manyathela Show

Clement speaks to Minister Lindiwe Sisulu following her deployment to Nkandla this weekend. Analysis and reaction following Jacob Zuma's defiance of the court order, follows thereafter. Guests include political analyst, Xolani Dube, and legal analysis from lawyer Richard Spoor and CASAC's Dan Mafora. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

37mins

5 Jul 2021

Similar People

Episode artwork

No day in court: Jacob Zuma’s jail sentence

The Intelligence from The Economist

South Africa’s embattled former leader will be imprisoned for failing to show up to trial—a sign that, for all the rot in South Africa, its Constitutional Court still has teeth. Our environment editor discusses the scope of heatwaves sweeping the northern hemisphere and cheap ways to lower their death tolls. And how a centuries-old rice dish has become politicised in India.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferSee acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

20mins

30 Jun 2021

Episode artwork

No day in court: Jacob Zuma’s jail sentence

Economist Radio

South Africa’s embattled former leader will be imprisoned for failing to show up to trial—a sign that, for all the rot in South Africa, its Constitutional Court still has teeth. Our environment editor discusses the scope of heatwaves sweeping the northern hemisphere and cheap ways to lower their death tolls. And how a centuries-old rice dish has become politicised in India.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferSee acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

20mins

30 Jun 2021

Most Popular

Episode artwork

No day in court: Jacob Zuma’s jail sentence

The Intelligence from The Economist

South Africa’s embattled former leader will be imprisoned for failing to show up to trial—a sign that, for all the rot in South Africa, its Constitutional Court still has teeth. Our environment editor discusses the scope of heatwaves sweeping the northern hemisphere and cheap ways to lower their death tolls. And how a centuries-old rice dish has become politicised in India.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferSee acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

20mins

30 Jun 2021

Episode artwork

Episode 2: Jacob Zuma

The Zondo Commission Unpacked: a Corruption Watch Podcast

Corruption Watch has been a constant fixture, both in person and virtually at the Zondo Commission. They have been covering this mammoth and important investigation into State Capture since the start. For this podcast series we are going to have a series of deep dive conversations with some of the people who are close to the commission and experts on anti-corruption work in South Africa.In this second episode our host Moepeng Valencia Talane speaks to Corruption Watch Executive Director, David Lewis. Brought to you by Corruption Watch. Hosted by Moepeng Valencia Talane.Produced by Volume.

29mins

22 Feb 2021

Episode artwork

Aubrey Matshiqi (Part 1): Ace Magashule Trial | Jacob Zuma Strategy

SMWX

In part one of my interview with political analyst uGogo Aubrey Matshiqi, we analyse Ace Magashule's appearance at the Free State Magistrate's court, and Jacob Zuma's stance on the State Capture Commission.  Advertise and partner: info@sizwempofuwalsh.co.za About me: Dr Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh is an author, scholar and founder of the Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh Xperience (SMWX), a digital, youth-centred current affairs platform. He holds a DPhil in International Relations from the University of Oxford and is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (WiSER). Watch SMWX on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/SizweMpofuWalshOfficial

35mins

19 Feb 2021

Episode artwork

Jacob Zuma snubs Zondo Commission. SARB keeps repo rate flat.

The Money Show

Bruce Whitfield speaks to Dr. Cathy Powell, Associate Professor in Public Law at University of Cape Town about Deputy Chief Justice Zondo dismissing Jacob Zuma's application for Zondo's recusal. SA Reserve Banks Monetary Policy Committee keeps repo rate flat. Retail Capital partners with Mr D Food to offer restaurants critical access to fundingSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1hr 18mins

19 Nov 2020

Episode artwork

|Episode 203| Duduzane Zuma on Childhood, Jacob Zuma , SA Hip Hop , Running for Presidency

Podcast and Chill with MacG

1hr 2mins

19 Nov 2020

Episode artwork

Jacob Zuma's Sick Note

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

South Africa’s former president Jacob Zuma has been charged with a string of crimes including corruption, racketeering and money-laundering. He denies all allegations of wrongdoing and earlier this week didn’t attend his trial saying he was too sick. But photos posted on social media suggest otherwise and Andrew Harding says its South Africans who are really sick - sick of Zuma’s excuses. A self-described ''Asian man who's good at math”, Andrew Yang is a very long-shot for the White House. But self deprecating humour aside, the Chinese American entrepreneur and candidate for the Democratic party has lasted longer in the contest than many expected. He broke down in tears last week in Iowa, saying that campaigning for the last two years had been “the journey of my life.” Among the audience were some curious students from mainland China. Some 360,000 Chinese students now study in the US but what are they learning about the American way of voting, asked Zhaoyin Feng, the BBC’s Mandarin correspondent in Washington. In celebration of the anniversary of the 1979 Islamic Revolution next Tuesday, there will be mass rallies across the country and fiery speeches about the Great Satan – the demonising epithet for the United States. This year long simmering tensions with America reached boiling point after the killing of Iranian General Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad. But this hostility isn’t just between countries. The government in Tehran has plenty of Iranian critics as well, both inside and outside the country. And some of them didn’t just live through the revolution – they once longed for it to happen. - Supported its aims. - Even took part in it themselves. Sadeq Sabah who was head of the BBC Persian service for some years, has his own memories of dangerous days in 1979 and afterwards.The flow of grisly headlines coming from Mexico has been almost constant in recent weeks. A group of Mormon mothers and children were murdered at the end of last year, this week four boys were shot dead in an amusement arcade and the bodies of two conservationists were found in a Monarch butterfly sanctuary in the west of the country. But many simply vanish in Mexico’s violent drug war. With no body or any clear sign as to what happened to them, families are left desperate for information. Will Grant was reminded of meeting one such family following a different breed of criminal abduction. Will Grant. In the early 1990s there were newspaper headlines comparing Sicily’s capital Palermo to Beirut. Following the killings of two high profile anti mafia judges in 1992, the government dispatched the army to contain what by that point had become an all-out war against the Italian state. The buildings in Palermo fared little better than residents. Palaces and villas were neglected while the mafia built concrete tower blocks in the suburbs. But recently the historic centre was declared a world heritage site and one man has helped to bring Palermo back from the brink says Dany Mitzman.

32mins

8 Feb 2020

Loading