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Jenny Salesa

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 22 Jan 2022 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Auckland twister: Local MP Jenny Salesa on evacuations

Morning Report

Dozens of people were again forced to sleep away from their homes in tornado-hit Papatoetoe overnight following the twister that struck South Auckland on Saturday.Emergency repairs will continue today, to restore power and remove debris - including roofing iron and toppled trees.Panmure-Otahuhu MP Jenny Salesa is worried many people whose houses were badly damaged may have chosen to stay put rather than seek emergency help.She spoke to Corin Dann.

4mins

20 Jun 2021

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Associate Minister of Health Jenny Salesa - COVID 19 Health Response Update

Pacific Breakfast: 531pi

On Monday this week, the Government announced a NZD$19.5m prioritising support for Pacific families and communities - the fund will go towards increasing the resourcing and capacity of those working to combat this virus. We’re joined now by Associate Health Minister Hon Jenny Salesa to give us an insight with regards to specific services covered by the package and an update on COVID-19 re: Pacific Health response, use of masks & testing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

11mins

3 Sep 2020

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Associate Minister of Health Jenny Salesa - COVID 19 Health Response Update

531pi

On Monday this week, the Government announced a NZD$19.5m prioritising support for Pacific families and communities - the fund will go towards increasing the resourcing and capacity of those working to combat this virus. We’re joined now by Associate Health Minister Hon Jenny Salesa to give us an insight with regards to specific services covered by the package and an update on COVID-19 re: Pacific Health response, use of masks & testing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

11mins

3 Sep 2020

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TALANGA FAKAFONUA 2020: Fakaafe makehe: Hon Jenny Salesa

531 PMN Tonga Language Program

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

33mins

19 Aug 2020

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The virus is the problem not people - Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa

Pacific Breakfast: 531pi

This morning on Pacific Breakfast, we speak with Associate Health Minister Hon, Jenny Salesa for an update on COVID-19 Alert Level 3. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

7mins

13 Aug 2020

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Jenny Salesa: Government announces long-awaited vaping regulation

The Weekend Collective

New legislation to regulate vaping will be introduced to Parliament tomorrow in an effort to balance helping smokers quit while not encouraging new users.The move to regulate the industry has been welcomed but there are fears some rules are too restrictive and could result in "losing people back to cigarettes".The Smokefree Environments and Regulated Products Vaping Amendment Bill bans the sale of vaping products to those under the age of 18.It also prohibits advertising the products, restricts the sale of specific flavours to R18 specialty stores, and introduces a safety system which would allow the Ministry of Health to recall products, suspend them and issue warnings.Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa said the Bill was the most significant change to New Zealand's smokefree laws since they were introduced 30 years ago."I am proud our Government is introducing a Bill that helps New Zealand achieve our Smokefree 2025 goal by giving smokers choices in how they give up, but that it also discourages our kids from taking vaping up if they've never smoked before."Salesa acknowledged the legislation had taken a while since plans to regulate the vaping industry were first announced in November 2018.She would not be drawn on whether the delays were political but said it took time to work through the details.When asked whether the new vaping rules would be in place by the election, Salesa was confident the process would move quickly."You can rest assured that I'll be asking for an expedited process," she said.ACT leader David Seymour is not pleased with the legislation. He said most vaping sales currently come from flavours, so banning them will mean more adults smoke for longer."The Government's wasted two years to slap damaging regulations on dairy owners while kids can still buy vape liquid online. It's got to be the worst legislative initiative of any government anywhere." Salesa denied that was the case, and said this was just one way for getting more people to give up vaping. Asked how the Government would stop people from buying the products online, Salesa said that while people will still be able to buy them online, they will be delivered in R18 courier bags to prevent children from getting their hands on them. ASH NZ director Deborah Hart encouraged all political parties to ensure legislation was passed into law by the middle of this year."The rapid rise of smoke-free nicotine products, especially vaping, is the most disruptive influence on smoking in decades. These products are challenging the smoked tobacco's stranglehold on the nicotine market", she said.Hart said the Bill recognised the importance of flavours for those trying to quit by allowing them to be sold in specialty R18 stores, while putting controls in place to discourage teenagers from starting to vape.Stores would only be approved as a specialist vape retailer if 85 per cent of their sales were vaping products.This restriction addresses concerns e-liquid flavours could potentially appeal to children.General retailers like dairies and gas stations would only be allowed to sell three flavours- tobacco, mint and menthol.Auckland Secondary Schools Principals' Association president Richard Dykes welcomed the ban on advertising and said it was "essential" to protect young people, but he was concerned about the regulation of specialty shops."We appreciate there are responsible retailers in New Zealand, however, we also know from young people that they already purchase vaping products illegally from some resellers, or simply acquire them through older friends or family members."Vaping Trade Association of New Zealand spokesman Jonathan Devery said the industry was relieved to have the legislation announced, which would help legitimise the industry.On the face of it, he was supportive of limiting the sale of flavours in independently owned convenience stores, like dairies, but was concerned the likes of supermarkets and petrol chains we...

5mins

23 Feb 2020

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Jenny Salesa: Government announces long-awaited vaping regulation

Politics Central

New legislation to regulate vaping will be introduced to Parliament tomorrow in an effort to balance helping smokers quit while not encouraging new users.The move to regulate the industry has been welcomed but there are fears some rules are too restrictive and could result in "losing people back to cigarettes".The Smokefree Environments and Regulated Products Vaping Amendment Bill bans the sale of vaping products to those under the age of 18.It also prohibits advertising the products, restricts the sale of specific flavours to R18 specialty stores, and introduces a safety system which would allow the Ministry of Health to recall products, suspend them and issue warnings.Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa said the Bill was the most significant change to New Zealand's smokefree laws since they were introduced 30 years ago."I am proud our Government is introducing a Bill that helps New Zealand achieve our Smokefree 2025 goal by giving smokers choices in how they give up, but that it also discourages our kids from taking vaping up if they've never smoked before."Salesa acknowledged the legislation had taken a while since plans to regulate the vaping industry were first announced in November 2018.She would not be drawn on whether the delays were political but said it took time to work through the details.When asked whether the new vaping rules would be in place by the election, Salesa was confident the process would move quickly."You can rest assured that I'll be asking for an expedited process," she said.ACT leader David Seymour is not pleased with the legislation. He said most vaping sales currently come from flavours, so banning them will mean more adults smoke for longer."The Government's wasted two years to slap damaging regulations on dairy owners while kids can still buy vape liquid online. It's got to be the worst legislative initiative of any government anywhere." Salesa denied that was the case, and said this was just one way for getting more people to give up vaping. Asked how the Government would stop people from buying the products online, Salesa said that while people will still be able to buy them online, they will be delivered in R18 courier bags to prevent children from getting their hands on them. ASH NZ director Deborah Hart encouraged all political parties to ensure legislation was passed into law by the middle of this year."The rapid rise of smoke-free nicotine products, especially vaping, is the most disruptive influence on smoking in decades. These products are challenging the smoked tobacco's stranglehold on the nicotine market", she said.Hart said the Bill recognised the importance of flavours for those trying to quit by allowing them to be sold in specialty R18 stores, while putting controls in place to discourage teenagers from starting to vape.Stores would only be approved as a specialist vape retailer if 85 per cent of their sales were vaping products.This restriction addresses concerns e-liquid flavours could potentially appeal to children.General retailers like dairies and gas stations would only be allowed to sell three flavours- tobacco, mint and menthol.Auckland Secondary Schools Principals' Association president Richard Dykes welcomed the ban on advertising and said it was "essential" to protect young people, but he was concerned about the regulation of specialty shops."We appreciate there are responsible retailers in New Zealand, however, we also know from young people that they already purchase vaping products illegally from some resellers, or simply acquire them through older friends or family members."Vaping Trade Association of New Zealand spokesman Jonathan Devery said the industry was relieved to have the legislation announced, which would help legitimise the industry.On the face of it, he was supportive of limiting the sale of flavours in independently owned convenience stores, like dairies, but was concerned the likes of supermarkets and petrol chains we...

5mins

23 Feb 2020

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Jenny Salesa: Government announces long-awaited vaping regulation

The Weekend Collective

New legislation to regulate vaping will be introduced to Parliament tomorrow in an effort to balance helping smokers quit while not encouraging new users.The move to regulate the industry has been welcomed but there are fears some rules are too restrictive and could result in "losing people back to cigarettes".The Smokefree Environments and Regulated Products Vaping Amendment Bill bans the sale of vaping products to those under the age of 18.It also prohibits advertising the products, restricts the sale of specific flavours to R18 specialty stores, and introduces a safety system which would allow the Ministry of Health to recall products, suspend them and issue warnings.Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa said the Bill was the most significant change to New Zealand's smokefree laws since they were introduced 30 years ago."I am proud our Government is introducing a Bill that helps New Zealand achieve our Smokefree 2025 goal by giving smokers choices in how they give up, but that it also discourages our kids from taking vaping up if they've never smoked before."Salesa acknowledged the legislation had taken a while since plans to regulate the vaping industry were first announced in November 2018.She would not be drawn on whether the delays were political but said it took time to work through the details.When asked whether the new vaping rules would be in place by the election, Salesa was confident the process would move quickly."You can rest assured that I'll be asking for an expedited process," she said.ACT leader David Seymour is not pleased with the legislation. He said most vaping sales currently come from flavours, so banning them will mean more adults smoke for longer."The Government's wasted two years to slap damaging regulations on dairy owners while kids can still buy vape liquid online. It's got to be the worst legislative initiative of any government anywhere." Salesa denied that was the case, and said this was just one way for getting more people to give up vaping. Asked how the Government would stop people from buying the products online, Salesa said that while people will still be able to buy them online, they will be delivered in R18 courier bags to prevent children from getting their hands on them. ASH NZ director Deborah Hart encouraged all political parties to ensure legislation was passed into law by the middle of this year."The rapid rise of smoke-free nicotine products, especially vaping, is the most disruptive influence on smoking in decades. These products are challenging the smoked tobacco's stranglehold on the nicotine market", she said.Hart said the Bill recognised the importance of flavours for those trying to quit by allowing them to be sold in specialty R18 stores, while putting controls in place to discourage teenagers from starting to vape.Stores would only be approved as a specialist vape retailer if 85 per cent of their sales were vaping products.This restriction addresses concerns e-liquid flavours could potentially appeal to children.General retailers like dairies and gas stations would only be allowed to sell three flavours- tobacco, mint and menthol.Auckland Secondary Schools Principals' Association president Richard Dykes welcomed the ban on advertising and said it was "essential" to protect young people, but he was concerned about the regulation of specialty shops."We appreciate there are responsible retailers in New Zealand, however, we also know from young people that they already purchase vaping products illegally from some resellers, or simply acquire them through older friends or family members."Vaping Trade Association of New Zealand spokesman Jonathan Devery said the industry was relieved to have the legislation announced, which would help legitimise the industry.On the face of it, he was supportive of limiting the sale of flavours in independently owned convenience stores, like dairies, but was concerned the likes of supermarkets and petrol chains we...

5mins

23 Feb 2020

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Jenny Salesa: Government hoping the keep smoking in cars to a minimum

The Weekend Collective

Anyone vaping or smoking with kids in the car could be hit with a $50 fine.The Government is moving to ban lighting up in vehicles when anyone under 18 is inside.It will apply to vehicles whether they're parked, or on the move.Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa expects the law to be changed by the end of this year.She told the Weekend Collective that it will be up to the police to enforce the law."After a lead in time of 18 months, police will have the ability and the discretion to issue an infringement fee of $50. Alternatively, police can issue warnings or referrals to support services."She says that there were several discussions amongst politicians, police and various Ministries in order to find the right fine. The $50 fine was seen as an acceptable level of enforcement. "The reality is that those smoking are from those in lower socio-economic areas. We did not want the fine to be such a struggle for them."Salesa says that she wants the fines to be kept to an absolute minimum. She wants the law to be used as a guidance that will alter people's opinions. She says it's about educating families."We're looking more at people changing their behaviour rather than police issuing infringement notices."Salesa says public education and social marketing campaigns over many years have had some impact."But the rate of reduction to children being exposed to smoking in vehicles has begun to slow. It is time for us to introduce legislation."She says multiple other countries have similar legislation. She says in the United Kingdom, only one case went through the court system. Salesa expects the law to be changed by the end of this year.The Children's Commissioner wants politicians to work together to make a new law succeed.Judge Andrew Becroft says children's health comes first."My plea to all politicians is let's make this cross-party. This can't be a political football and meshed with political mumbo-jumbo about freedom of choice. Children don't have choice." Becroft says there's no reason why you can't smoke outside.He hopes that the law doesn't stop with cars."I hope we do get to the point, maybe in decades to come, when it will be unlawful to smoke in the home."

5mins

10 Feb 2019