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Erik Davis

56 Podcast Episodes

Latest 4 Jul 2022 | Updated Daily

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EP371: Buy and Bill vs Pharmacy Bagging—Which Is Better for a Plan Sponsor and Patients? With Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu

Relentless Healthcare Value

So, this is a 400-level episode in specialty pharmacy options for plan sponsors, meaning here are your prerequisites: You gotta know what buy and bill is, and you gotta know what pharmacy bagging is, meaning white bagging, for example. If you do not, I would listen to Encore! EP282 with Aaron Mitchell, MD, MPH, where we go deep on buy and bill. And then listen to EP369 for the skinny on pharmacy bagging. If you already know what buy and bill is and you already know what white bagging is, then not only do you know more than 98% of the people in the healthcare industry, but also, you’re going to get as much out of this conversation with Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu as I did.   Last week’s show was also with Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu. Last week, we talked about how some hospitals and cancer centers are managing to ring up up to six times the cost of an expensive-already injected or infused drug through buy and bill. This is why pharmacy bagging became a thing, if we want to talk about this in historical perspective. It’s a direct market response to buy and bill. Hospital systems start making egregious amounts of money marking up drugs that already cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, and their markups are hundreds of thousands of dollars on top of that. Hospital starts making a fortune off of drug markups. Plan sponsors need an alternative, and … enter pharmacy bagging (ie, carving out specialty pharmacy drugs to a PBM [pharmacy benefit manager]). In this show, we compare the potential benefits and problematic loopholes and/or patient concerns for plan sponsors who are trying to figure out whether to carve out specialty pharmacy benefits to a PBM or grin and bear it with the buy and bill. Or, as another option, whether to steer patients to specific infusion centers or specific provider organizations that might have more favorable contract terms for the plan sponsor. Or, hooking up with a home infusion company, again, who is willing to negotiate terms that might be far better for said plan sponsor than just letting some hospital have their way with employees and the health plan. As another alternative, of course, plan sponsors could consider medical travel, which some certainly are. My biggest takeaway from this whole conversation and from the episodes that we have had in this, dare I call it, series about pharmacy benefits, starting with the show with Scott Haas (EP365) where we talked about PBM contracts, moving to the show with Dr. Aaron Mitchell (Encore! EP282) where we talked about buy and bill, then going to the show with Keith Hartman (EP369) where we talked about pharmacy bagging, then last week’s show how hospitals manage to buy and bill at 6x the price of these expensive pharmaceuticals … my takeaway from this whole specialty drug extravaganza is that specialty drug procurement is very different than retail drug procurement. Retail drugs, you worry about them en masse at scale almost at the population level. Specialty drugs? You can have one patient on a specialty drug, and that one patient costs as much as the entire rest of the member population combined. So, managing specialty drugs and their administration becomes almost a case-by-case operation. What drug is it? Where is the patient? What options are available? It’s possible to save hundreds of thousands of dollars on that one patient, for that one patient’s care, and get better patient outcomes by getting the right patient on the right drug that is administered in the right setting.   You can learn more by connecting with Erik and Autumn on LinkedIn or by emailing them at erik.davis@usi.com and autumn.yongchu@usi.com.   Erik Davis, AAI, CIC, CRM, is senior vice president and principal consultant, managed care and analytics, at USI Insurance Services. He has over 30 years of experience in the insurance and risk management industry. Erik works to create an environment that supports the healthcare risk management goals of an organization while maintaining focus on compliance and financial accountability. He is instrumental in vendor negotiations, data benchmarking, population health strategies, claims analysis, recommendations in plan design, and communication strategies. In this capacity, Erik has been involved with development of rates, payment structures, and recommendations of changes in processes, policies, and procedures. He has a broad understanding of contract analysis, evaluating risk, auditing for correct payment, and structuring of excess loss and pharmacy programs. Erik’s experience extends from overall employee benefits consulting to workers’ compensation, as well as managed care organizations in Medicaid, Medicare, and commercial contractual risk arrangements. Erik earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from Oregon State University. He holds Accredited Advisor in Insurance (AAI), Certified Insurance Counselor (CIC), and Certified Risk Manager (CRM) designations. Autumn Yongchu is a healthcare operational risk consultant at USI Insurance Services. Autumn works with multiple database platforms to examine data for trends and abnormalities. Using investigative querying, medical coding analysis, and report development, she provides resources that help identify cost control opportunities and assists organizations in strategic business decisions regarding the management of healthcare risks. Autumn analyzes and interprets healthcare utilization data, allowing the development of initiatives regarding claim and risk management. This includes identifying fiscal and clinical strategies and providing necessary information to develop, design, and implement management initiatives. Autumn also analyzes trends, assists with insurance underwriting, and adjudicates stop-loss claims. Autumn has an in-depth knowledge of Medicaid and Medicare billing guidelines and payment methodologies. Prior to joining USI, Autumn was a claims auditor and trainer for a managed care organization which serviced over 100,000 commercial, Medicaid, and Medicare lives. Her responsibilities included contract analysis, claims adjudication, ensuring accurate payment, and identifying and recouping errors. 04:45 Can you actually save money by carving out specialty infused drugs and making them a pharmacy benefit? 06:28 How can plan sponsors use white bagging as leverage to reduce costs from markups? 06:47 Does white bagging save money compared to buy and bill? 07:42 “You also need to understand that with some of these drugs, you’re dealing with very vulnerable people.”—Erik 08:41 EP369 with Keith Hartman, RPh. 11:10 “When your insurance carrier is married to your PBM, it doesn’t matter where the money goes.”—Autumn 11:33 EP365 with Scott Haas. 12:00 “You need to have a collective understanding of every variable … when you’re making those … decisions.”—Erik 14:53 How can comparison shopping save plan sponsors money when it comes to specialty infusion costs? 16:51 How can comparison shopping be a vicious circle in the wrong setting for plan sponsors? 18:43 “That’s part of the problem: It’s not just the plan sponsor not being educated enough; it’s also the consultant … that they believe is supposed to be that isn’t.”—Erik 19:03 How has transparency been used by healthcare systems to keep buyers’ eyes off the ball? 26:55 “It is very case by case, but it comes down to your risk appetite.”—Autumn 28:19 “It’s something that you have to, as a plan sponsor, really continue to monitor throughout the plan year.”—Autumn 28:38 “The more you know, the better equipped you’re gonna be.”—Autumn 29:27 What can employers who are feeling aggressive do? 31:19 “The dollars circle, whether people realize it or not.”—Autumn You can learn more by connecting with Erik and Autumn on LinkedIn or by emailing them at erik.davis@usi.com and autumn.yongchu@usi.com.   Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma Can you actually save money by carving out specialty infused drugs and making them a pharmacy benefit? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma How can plan sponsors use white bagging as leverage to reduce costs from markups? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma Does white bagging save money compared to buy and bill? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma “You also need to understand that with some of these drugs, you’re dealing with very vulnerable people.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma “When your insurance carrier is married to your PBM, it doesn’t matter where the money goes.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma “You need to have a collective understanding of every variable … when you’re making those … decisions.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma How can comparison shopping save plan sponsors money when it comes to specialty infusion costs? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma How can comparison shopping be a vicious circle in the wrong setting for plan sponsors? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma “That’s part of the problem: It’s not just the plan sponsor not being educated enough; it’s also the consultant … that they believe is supposed to be that isn’t.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma How has transparency been used by healthcare systems to keep buyers’ eyes off the ball? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma “It is very case by case, but it comes down to your risk appetite.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma “It’s something that you have to, as a plan sponsor, really continue to monitor throughout the plan year.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma “The more you know, the better equipped you’re gonna be.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma What can employers who are feeling aggressive do? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma “The dollars circle, whether people realize it or not.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #buyandbill and #pharmabagging on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #pharmacy #pharma Recent past interviews: Click a guest’s name for their latest RHV episode! Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP370), Keith Hartman, Dr Aaron Mitchell (Encore! EP282), Stacey Richter (INBW34), Ashleigh Gunter, Doug Hetherington, Dr Kevin Schulman, Scott Haas, David Muhlestein, David Scheinker, Ali Ucar, Dr Carly Eckert, Jeb Dunkelberger (EP360), Dan O’Neill, Dr Wayne Jenkins, Liliana Petrova, Ge Bai, Nikhil Krishnan, Shawn Rhodes, Pramod John (EP353), Pramod John (EP352), Dr Eric Bricker, Katy Talento, Stacey Richter (INBW33), Stacey Richter (INBW32), Dr Steve Schutzer (Encore! EP294), Lisa Trumble, Jeb Dunkelberger

32mins

23 Jun 2022

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EP370: How Do Some Health Systems Manage to Charge 6x the Cost of a Specialty Pharmacy Med to Infuse It? With Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu

Relentless Healthcare Value

I have been on a mission to figure out why some health systems, particularly in the oncology space but not limited to the oncology space, could manage to mark up the price of infused specialty pharmacy drugs up to 6x. Some employers and patients are paying six times the cost of a specialty pharmacy drug in markup for some already incredibly expensive specialty pharmacy drug at some oncology centers. Read more about this in a study by Roy Xiao, MD, and colleagues. Let’s not forget now or ever that financial toxicity is clinical toxicity. This 6x is exactly how financial toxicity is operationalized. Many patients are charged a coinsurance percentage based on their cost of care, after all; and like 20% of 6x is a huge number, it is a huge bankrupting bill for some patients—maybe many patients. That, plus their premiums go up because, of course, their employers are picking up the remaining 80% of that 600% markup. Families are already, on average, paying I think it’s $22,000 in premium; and the trend line on that premium growth continues to go up steeply in the 2022-23 projections that I have seen. Bottom line: This 6x is not a victimless modus operandi is my point. But what I wanted to know is how they do it, these health systems. Charging 6x the cost of a super expensive specialty pharmacy drug in markup would seem to require some skill, right? And any time I see a Pandora’s box, I have a terrible habit of trying to get in there. Autumn Yongchu and Erik Davis to the rescue. Today’s show digs into how some health systems and hospitals stack the odds that no one will notice their 6x markups and just pay the bills. Here’s the short version of the playbook, but you’ll need to listen to the show for a more robust explanation. First off, keep in mind that while Medicare Part B tells hospitals to charge ASP (average sales price) + 6% (ish) when they buy and bill Medicare patients, there is no such guidance for commercial patients. Commercial insurers negotiate a fee off chargemaster rates, and as we all know, those chargemaster prices are, in general, based on absolutely nothing and are, in general, sky-high. So that’s the first thing. The second thing gets into coding. Let me give you the general idea here, but we talk about this in some depth in the conversation to come. As you likely know, hospitals get paid by sending bills with codes on them—procedure codes, for example. We the hospital did this procedure, and our charge for this procedure is $4000—so, here you go. Code followed by dollar amount is shown on somebody’s bill or explanation of benefits document. These procedure codes are standardized across the industry for the most part. It’s not like every health system and/or payer is making up their own. This standardized set of procedure codes is called the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System, affectionally known as HCPCS. So, if someone starts talking about a HCPCS code, all it means is that the code comes out of that standard set of codes. Now, J-codes are one kind of code in this common procedure coding system. They are procedure codes that start with a “J.” These J-codes are for procedures involving (usually) specialty pharmacy drugs. A J-code identifies the specialty pharmacy drug that was used in the procedure. So, you’d think it’d be pretty easy to audit a hospital bill, right? You look at the J-code on the bill; you find the ASP, the average sales price, or whatever of the drug; and then you get out your trusty calculator and you do the math on what the markup is. And okay, maybe this works sometimes … but the problem is that so very, very often, the hospital doesn’t put the actual drug’s J-code on the bill. There’s this miscellaneous J-code that doesn’t specify the drug used, which is a quite common tactic, it seems. (I learned that in this episode.) Hospital just sticks “Miscellaneous chemotherapy” on a bill with a price after it, and nobody knows what drug was used. Or the hospital will send a bill that just includes revenue codes. I think about revenue codes as the name of the section of the bill. It’s like on a menu: There’s that section, that headline, that says “Seafood” with a whole list of seafood dishes underneath it. In this example, the Seafood header is like the revenue code; and the J-codes are the actual dishes. Some bills come from the hospital, and all they have on them are the revenue code. There was some seafood. We’re not gonna tell you what dish or how much seafood, but yeah, seafood. The only thing we know about seafood is that there was some and it was very pricy. Here’s a great example of a bill with some explanations.   The main point here is that how health systems get away, in large part, with charging a whole lot for specialty pharmacy drugs is that their bills roll up charges into these very opaque codes that include lots and lots of stuff that is not broken out. When I interviewed Marshall Allen (EP328) and we talked about his book Never Pay the First Bill, he said step one in getting an accurate and fair bill is to ask for the line item charges—and now that is totally making sense to me and also why this is so vital. Just be aware, if you ask for these breakouts, you will likely get a huge box of hard copies. Check out this photo of a literally three-foot pile of printouts that one patient-turned-artist exhibited at an art show recently that I saw. If you don’t have the stamina to sort through all of those pages and pages and pages, you could be subject to 6x or more in markups or billing errors which are all too common and all too expensive. Hospital charges are a huge chunk of any employer’s healthcare spend, after all—over half of it in some cases. These are not small potatoes that we’re talking about. These are bills that bankrupt patients and make premiums go so high that patients cannot afford to get care.   In this healthcare podcast, as mentioned earlier, we have two guests—Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu—both from USI Managed Care Consulting and both having spent decades deep in the inner workings of the healthcare industry. And the topic of today’s show required that depth of knowledge, for sure. You can learn more by connecting with Erik and Autumn on LinkedIn or by emailing them at erik.davis@usi.com and autumn.yongchu@usi.com.   Erik Davis, AAI, CIC, CRM, is senior vice president and principal consultant, managed care and analytics, at USI Insurance Services. He has over 30 years of experience in the insurance and risk management industry. Erik works to create an environment that supports the healthcare risk management goals of an organization while maintaining focus on compliance and financial accountability. He is instrumental in vendor negotiations, data benchmarking, population health strategies, claims analysis, recommendations in plan design, and communication strategies. In this capacity, Erik has been involved with development of rates, payment structures, and recommendations of changes in processes, policies, and procedures. He has a broad understanding of contract analysis, evaluating risk, auditing for correct payment, and structuring of excess loss and pharmacy programs. Erik’s experience extends from overall employee benefits consulting to workers’ compensation, as well as managed care organizations in Medicaid, Medicare, and commercial contractual risk arrangements. Erik earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from Oregon State University. He holds Accredited Advisor in Insurance (AAI), Certified Insurance Counselor (CIC), and Certified Risk Manager (CRM) designations. Autumn Yongchu is a healthcare operational risk consultant at USI Insurance Services. Autumn works with multiple database platforms to examine data for trends and abnormalities. Using investigative querying, medical coding analysis, and report development, she provides resources that help identify cost control opportunities and assists organizations in strategic business decisions regarding the management of healthcare risks. Autumn analyzes and interprets healthcare utilization data, allowing the development of initiatives regarding claim and risk management. This includes identifying fiscal and clinical strategies and providing necessary information to develop, design, and implement management initiatives. Autumn also analyzes trends, assists with insurance underwriting, and adjudicates stop-loss claims. Autumn has an in-depth knowledge of Medicaid and Medicare billing guidelines and payment methodologies. Prior to joining USI, Autumn was a claims auditor and trainer for a managed care organization which serviced over 100,000 commercial, Medicaid, and Medicare lives. Her responsibilities included contract analysis, claims adjudication, ensuring accurate payment, and identifying and recouping errors. 07:33 How do hospitals maximize inpatient bills? 08:05 How can hospitals upcode on specialty pharmacy products? 09:44 “It’s really not uncommon to be overbilled and overcharged.”—Autumn 11:11 Why do marked up bill charges actually affect the price commercial payers pay? 12:49 “If your payer’s not double-checking … how do you know that fraud’s happening?”—Autumn 12:52 “If the payer doesn’t have the detail to validate what that drug actually is, then are they really checking?”—Autumn 13:33 Why is it so hard to verify what you’re actually paying for on a hospital bill? 16:28 How do hospitals maximize profit with outpatients? 17:12 “Really it comes down to contracts and how [the] contracts are written.”—Autumn 21:54 “There are … silos within healthcare, and none of them actually talk to each other.”—Autumn 24:56 “There are these rules out there, but there are also big loopholes out there.”—Autumn 26:13 How can hospitals maximize payments for Medicare patients on drugs that have been out for a while? 29:30 “We just have a tendency to assume … that Medicare has a rate for everything, and Medicare doesn’t.”—Autumn 30:32: EP369 with Keith Hartman, RPh.   You can learn more by connecting with Erik and Autumn on LinkedIn or by emailing them at erik.davis@usi.com and autumn.yongchu@usi.com.   Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems How do hospitals maximize inpatient bills? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems How can hospitals upcode on specialty pharmacy products? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems “It’s really not uncommon to be overbilled and overcharged.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems Why do marked up bill charges actually affect the price commercial payers pay? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems “If your payer’s not double-checking … how do you know that fraud’s happening?” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems “If the payer doesn’t have the detail to validate what that drug actually is, then are they really checking?” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems Why is it so hard to verify what you’re actually paying for on a hospital bill? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems How do hospitals maximize profit with outpatients? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems “Really it comes down to contracts and how [the] contracts are written.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems “There are … silos within healthcare, and none of them actually talk to each other.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems “There are these rules out there, but there are also big loopholes out there.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems How can hospitals maximize payments for Medicare patients on drugs that have been out for a while? Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems “We just have a tendency to assume … that Medicare has a rate for everything, and Medicare doesn’t.” Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu discuss #specialtypharma billing in #healthsystems on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #hospitalsystems Recent past interviews: Click a guest’s name for their latest RHV episode! Keith Hartman, Dr Aaron Mitchell (Encore! EP282), Stacey Richter (INBW34), Ashleigh Gunter, Doug Hetherington, Dr Kevin Schulman, Scott Haas, David Muhlestein, David Scheinker, Ali Ucar, Dr Carly Eckert, Jeb Dunkelberger (EP360), Dan O’Neill, Dr Wayne Jenkins, Liliana Petrova, Ge Bai, Nikhil Krishnan, Shawn Rhodes, Pramod John (EP353), Pramod John (EP352), Dr Eric Bricker, Katy Talento, Stacey Richter (INBW33), Stacey Richter (INBW32), Dr Steve Schutzer (Encore! EP294), Lisa Trumble, Jeb Dunkelberger, Dr Ian Tong

31mins

16 Jun 2022

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Pain | Small Boat Big Sea | March 13 | Erik Davis

Lake Ridge Community Church Podcast

Erik Davis, Youth Ministry Leader continues in our sermon series for Lent: Small Boat, Big Sea. Jesus spent several years of his ministry around a lake with his followers. Often he criss-crossed the Sea of Galilee on a boat, teaching, healing, and doing some surprising things that all pointed to God’s work in making things right in a broken world. In many ways, our world today does not feel ‘right.’ So many things seem broken. Jesus did a strange thing: taking a small group of friends out into a big world is risky and should be doomed to fail. Jesus showed that as long as he was on the boat, his followers were safe to venture out with him. Today we are a little boat on a big sea. We are always learning to trust God as the waves and wind push and pull. But we can live courageously knowing that Jesus is here, and knows the way. Join is for our Lenten journey to encounter Jesus, and his invitation into new life with him.

30mins

15 Mar 2022

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A Psychedelic Sangha with Erik Davis

Consciousness Explorers Podcast

Today we meet Erik Davis, award-winning journalist and author, most recently, of High Weirdness: Drugs, Esoterica, and Visionary Experience in the Seventies.Erik guides us in an imagination-based open awareness practice that for him is about cultivating a very specific kind of watchful attention. This turns out to be the perfect setup to discuss one of Erik’s specialities: the defiantly unclassifiable weirdness of psychedelic experience.We explore the ins and outs of the current psychedelic revival, the heretical nature of psychedelics as “practice,” even the possibility of the Buddha himself being a psychonaut. Can we scale-up psychedelic use for the mainstream? Do we even want to? And down we go, into a highly entertaining rabbit hole. Erik’s immersive 16 minute practice begins at 8:36 and ends at 24:20.  Links:• Erik’s website: https://techgnosis.com • Erik’s substack• High Weirdness Book• Psychedelic Sangha: https://psychedelicsangha.org • Erik’s Guided Psychedelic Meditation Music Album ExperienceSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/explorerspod)

1hr 2mins

24 Feb 2022

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Shalom & the Jesus Way of Contentment | Shalom | Feb 6 | Erik Davis

Lake Ridge Community Church Podcast

Erik Davis, Youth Ministry Leader continues in the sermon series Shalom. We are exploring themes of peace. The Bible mentions peace over 400 times and it is counted as a Fruit of the Spirit, and Jesus talks about it on the Sermon on the Mount. In times of peace we skip over the stories of God’s peace in the bible because we do not need it. However through most of history people have not been at peace, fear, famine, and war has often been a part of the human experience. Today, when life and our society closes in on us with fear, violence, and anger, we can feel peace evaporate. For this reason, we turn again to the Prince of Peace and rediscover the ways that God creates peace in us, and welcomes the Church to be the People of Peace in challenging times. We are temped to run  around with our hair on fire when we are not at peace, but there is another way.

24mins

8 Feb 2022

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Enter the Sanctum of the Heroic Pervert with Erik Davis

WAKE ISLAND

In this episode we try to articulate the fog of our time, away from fear, toward the pervert’s embrace of absurdity, uncertainty, spiritual warfare, gallows humor, the distinction between happiness and joy, and the strange, redemptive sanctum of the heroic pervert...Erik Davis, PhD, is an author, award-winning journalist, sometimes podcaster, and popular speaker based in San Francisco. He is the author of five books: High Weirdness: Drugs, Esoterica, and Visionary Experience in the 70s; Nomad Codes: Adventures in Modern Esoterica; The Visionary State: A Journey through California’s Spiritual Landscape, and the 33 1/3 volume Led Zeppelin IV. His first and best-known book remains TechGnosis: Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of Information. Erik hosted the podcast Expanding Mind on the Progressive Radio Network for a decade, and earned his PhD in Religious Studies from Rice University in 2015. He currently writes the Substack publication Burning Shore. To learn more about Erik visit his site at techgnosis.com.Theme music by Joseph E. Martinez of Junius    Follow us on social at:   Twitter: @WakeIslandPodInstagram: @wakeislandpodDavid's Twitter: @raviddice  Erik's Twitter: @erik_davis--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wake-island/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wake-island/support

1hr 32mins

20 Jan 2022

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The Psychospiritual Legacy of The Beatles, Erik Davis & Anderson Todd

Rebel Wisdom

Why are we still obsessed with The Beatles, and is it healthy? Fifty years after they broke up, it seems that the mark they made on our culture has not faded. Does this demonstrate the timeless genius of the band, or is it a sign of a culture that is stuck? A few days ago saw the release of an eight hour fly-on-the-wall documentary 'Get Back', made by Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson. It shows some of their last sessions as they put together the album 'Let it Be', and culminated in their famous rooftop concert. Erik Davis is the foremost historian of the counterculture, and Anderson Todd works in the Wisdom and Consciousness Lab at Toronto University. In this epic conversational riff they examine what was captured in The Beatles' music and why it resonates today. This conversation was recorded in the Rebel Wisdom Digital Campfire. To join conversations like this check out our upcoming events: https://rebelwisdom.co.uk/campfire-events Check out Erik's newsletter, 'The Burning Shore' https://techgnosis.com/discover-burning-shore/

1hr 28mins

30 Nov 2021

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Youth Sunday: The Shema | Youth Ministry Leader Erik Davis | Nov 21

Lake Ridge Community Church Podcast

On this special Sunday, Lake Ridge’s Youth Group led and planned the service for our congregation. Youth Ministry Leader Erik preaches on The Shema. Enjoy!

31mins

22 Nov 2021

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Erik Davis in conversation with Julia Pond

DanceOutsideDance

Erik Davis and Julia Pond talk about psychedelic dance and the way altered states of mind and movement interact. Topics range from bone-dancing at Grateful Dead shows ("The bands were incidental to the dance"), the way movement resonates through time and generations, and the salvage rhythms of late capitalism (with thanks to Anna Tsing for the phrase). People: Erik Davis, PhD, is an author, award-winning journalist, sometimes podcaster, and popular speaker based in San Francisco. He is the author of five books: High Weirdness: Drugs, Esoterica, and Visionary Experience in the 70s (MIT Press/Strange Attractor Press); Nomad Codes: Adventures in Modern Esoterica (Yeti, 2010); The Visionary State: A Journey through California’s Spiritual Landscape (Chronicle, 2006), with photographs by Michael Rauner; and the 33 1/3 volume Led Zeppelin IV (Continuum, 2005). His first and best-known book remains TechGnosis: Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of Information (Crown, 1998), a cult classic of visionary media studies that has been translated into five languages and most recently republished by North Atlantic Press. He has contributed chapters on art, music, technoculture, and contemporary spirituality to over a dozen books, including Suzanne Treister’s HFT: The Gardener(Black Dog), Future Matters: the Persistence of Philip K. Dick (Palgrave), Sound Unbound: Writings on Contemporary Multimedia and Music Culture (MIT, 2008), AfterBurn: Reflections on Burning Man (University of New Mexico, 2005), Rave Ascension (Routledge, 2003), and Zig Zag Zen (Chronicle, 2002). In addition to his many forewords and introductions, Davis has contributed articles and essays to a variety of periodicals, including Bookforum, Arthur, Artforum, Slate, Salon, Gnosis, Rolling Stone, the LA Weekly, Spin, Wired and the Village Voice.A vital speaker, Davis has given talks at universities, media art conferences, and festivals around the world. He has taught seminars at the UC Berkeley, UC Davis, the California Institute of Integral Studies, and Rice University, as well as workshops at the New York Open Center and Esalen. He has been interviewed by CNN, NPR, the New York Times, and the BBC, and appeared in numerous documentaries, as well as in Craig Baldwin’s underground film Specters of the Spectrum. He wrote the libretto for and performed in “How to Survive the Apocalypse,” a Burning Man-inspired rock opera. He hosted the podcast Expanding Mind on the Progressive Radio Network for a decade, and earned his PhD in Religious Studies from Rice University in 2015. He currently writes the Substack publication Burning Shore.Julia Pond is a dance artist, teacher and researcher interested in how embodied practices and dance interact with social and political themes. Julia has worked primarily in the UK, US and Italy, and is currently completing an MFA in Creative Practice: Dance Professional at Trinity Laban / Independent Dance, as well as podcasting, parenting, and teaching. Read More: Erik Davis: https://techgnosis.com/Burning Shore Substack Newsletter: https://www.burningshore.com/Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt. (2017) The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

1hr

31 Aug 2021

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#4 - Erik Davis: Psychedelics, Coronavirus, & Post-Religion Spirituality

Society In Question

(Originally recorded in the Spring of 2020) On this episode I'm joined by the ever-articulate scholar, Erik Davis, who wrote one of my favorite non-fiction books of all time: Techgnosis: Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of Information (seriously, it's remarkable). Erik also recently released a new book, High Weirdness, that explores the psychedelic spirituality of Robert Anton Wilson, Philip K Dick, and Terrance Mckenna. In addition to discussing these brilliant works, Erik and I dig deep into the chaos the Coronavirus is unleashing upon humanity, and how the lessons learned by psychonauts have never been more useful than they are now for this surreal moment in human history. * Want to ask a question, provide feedback, or share your thoughts on the show or a topic? Then feel free to leave a voice message at https://anchor.fm/society-in-question/message or send an email to steven.parton@societyinquestion.com. You can also find more information at SocietyInQuestion.com Hosted & Produced by: Steven Parton--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/society-in-question/message

1hr 26mins

23 Jul 2021

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