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Noah Shusterman

10 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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The Road to the Second Amendment with Noah Shusterman (part II)

The Rogue Historian

Noah and I pick up where we left off in part I and discuss why Noah thinks the Second Amendment no longer makes sense...which btw, is the opening line in his new book, Armed Citizens: The Road from Ancient Rome to the Second Amendment. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-rogue-historian/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-rogue-historian/support

42mins

7 Oct 2020

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The Road to the Second Amendment with Noah Shusterman (part I)

The Rogue Historian

This is a conversation that anyone who has an interest in the Second Amendment should hear...Noah and I discuss his latest book, Armed Citizens: the Road to the Second Amendment. IN part one we discuss context and meaning behind the amendment...good stuff! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-rogue-historian/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-rogue-historian/support

37mins

5 Oct 2020

Similar People

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Ep 21: Dr. Noah Shusterman - Bonus Clip # 2 - Tips for Efficient Grading

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

Bonus Clip # 2: Tips for Efficient Grading [00:00-4:40] To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

4mins

22 Aug 2016

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Ep 21: Dr. Noah Shusterman - Bonus Clip # 1 - Using Vacation Breaks for Research

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

Bonus Clip # 1: Using Vacation Breaks for Research [00:00-3:28] To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

3mins

22 Aug 2016

Most Popular

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Ep 21: Dr. Noah Shusterman on Maintaining a Researcher Identity

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, I am joined by Dr. Noah Shusterman, a historian currently working as an Assistant Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Noah is a specialist in early-modern Europe and the eighteenth-century Atlantic World. He is the author of Religion and the Politics of Time: Holidays in France from Louis the 14th through Napoleon, and The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics. Noah is now working on a history of militias and citizen-soldiers in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. From 2005-2013, Noah worked as a non-tenure-track lecturer/assistant professor (teaching track) at Temple University, teaching "gened" and history courses. His Ph.D. is from UC Berkeley. Segment 1: Maintaining a Researcher Identity [00:00-8:34] In this first segment, Noah shares how he maintained his research identity while in a teaching-intensive faculty position and how he eventually transitioned into a research position. Segment 2: Making Research Happen with a Heavy Teaching Load [8:35-19:03] In segment two, Noah shares his tips and suggestions for scheduling time for research and prepping for teaching efficiently. Segment 3: Being an International Researcher [19:04-31:41] In segment three, Noah shares about his experience living, working, and researching in Hong Kong. Bonus Clip # 1: Using Vacation Breaks for Research [00:00-3:28] Bonus Clip # 2: Tips for Efficient Grading [00:00-4:40] To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

31mins

22 Aug 2016

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Noah Shusterman, “The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics” (Routledge, 2013)

New Books in Gender

This year marks the 225th anniversary of the outbreak of the French Revolution. You don’t have to be a historian to know and appreciate how significant that revolution is to our understanding of French society and culture since the eighteenth century. Noah Shusterman‘s new book, The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics (Routledge, 2013) is an accessible book that provides readers with an overview of the major events and historical actors who shaped the Revolution from the storming of the Bastille on July 14th, 1789 to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. It is a book that offers a compelling narrative and draws on the vast field of scholarship that has analyzed and interpreted these events for over two centuries.This new study of the French Revolution emphasizes the central roles that religion and gender played as events unfolded, from the “liberal revolution” of 1789 through the emergence of the republic, from the Terror to Napoleon’s ascent. Readers familiar with the history of the French Revolution will especially appreciate chapters that pay close attention to the 1790 Civil Constitution of the Clergy and the revolt in the Vendee, issues and events that do not often get the play they may deserve in other surveys. Those who have always wanted to learn about the Revolution will find this book a highly informative and fascinating introduction to historical events and actors that help us understand so much that followed, in France and well beyond its borders. In our interview, Noah and I talk about teaching , the plethora of historical and political interpretations of the French Revolution, and the continuing relevance of that history to a contemporary French republic still struggling with issues of faith, desire, and politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

1hr 3mins

14 Jul 2014

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Noah Shusterman, “The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics” (Routledge, 2013)

New Books in French Studies

This year marks the 225th anniversary of the outbreak of the French Revolution. You don’t have to be a historian to know and appreciate how significant that revolution is to our understanding of French society and culture since the eighteenth century. Noah Shusterman‘s new book, The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics (Routledge, 2013) is an accessible book that provides readers with an overview of the major events and historical actors who shaped the Revolution from the storming of the Bastille on July 14th, 1789 to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. It is a book that offers a compelling narrative and draws on the vast field of scholarship that has analyzed and interpreted these events for over two centuries.This new study of the French Revolution emphasizes the central roles that religion and gender played as events unfolded, from the “liberal revolution” of 1789 through the emergence of the republic, from the Terror to Napoleon’s ascent. Readers familiar with the history of the French Revolution will especially appreciate chapters that pay close attention to the 1790 Civil Constitution of the Clergy and the revolt in the Vendee, issues and events that do not often get the play they may deserve in other surveys. Those who have always wanted to learn about the Revolution will find this book a highly informative and fascinating introduction to historical events and actors that help us understand so much that followed, in France and well beyond its borders. In our interview, Noah and I talk about teaching , the plethora of historical and political interpretations of the French Revolution, and the continuing relevance of that history to a contemporary French republic still struggling with issues of faith, desire, and politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

1hr 3mins

14 Jul 2014

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Noah Shusterman, “The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics” (Routledge, 2013)

New Books in Christian Studies

This year marks the 225th anniversary of the outbreak of the French Revolution. You don’t have to be a historian to know and appreciate how significant that revolution is to our understanding of French society and culture since the eighteenth century. Noah Shusterman‘s new book, The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics (Routledge, 2013) is an accessible book that provides readers with an overview of the major events and historical actors who shaped the Revolution from the storming of the Bastille on July 14th, 1789 to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. It is a book that offers a compelling narrative and draws on the vast field of scholarship that has analyzed and interpreted these events for over two centuries.This new study of the French Revolution emphasizes the central roles that religion and gender played as events unfolded, from the “liberal revolution” of 1789 through the emergence of the republic, from the Terror to Napoleon’s ascent. Readers familiar with the history of the French Revolution will especially appreciate chapters that pay close attention to the 1790 Civil Constitution of the Clergy and the revolt in the Vendee, issues and events that do not often get the play they may deserve in other surveys. Those who have always wanted to learn about the Revolution will find this book a highly informative and fascinating introduction to historical events and actors that help us understand so much that followed, in France and well beyond its borders. In our interview, Noah and I talk about teaching , the plethora of historical and political interpretations of the French Revolution, and the continuing relevance of that history to a contemporary French republic still struggling with issues of faith, desire, and politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

1hr 3mins

14 Jul 2014

Episode artwork

Noah Shusterman, “The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics” (Routledge, 2013)

New Books in European Studies

This year marks the 225th anniversary of the outbreak of the French Revolution. You don’t have to be a historian to know and appreciate how significant that revolution is to our understanding of French society and culture since the eighteenth century. Noah Shusterman‘s new book, The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics (Routledge, 2013) is an accessible book that provides readers with an overview of the major events and historical actors who shaped the Revolution from the storming of the Bastille on July 14th, 1789 to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. It is a book that offers a compelling narrative and draws on the vast field of scholarship that has analyzed and interpreted these events for over two centuries.This new study of the French Revolution emphasizes the central roles that religion and gender played as events unfolded, from the “liberal revolution” of 1789 through the emergence of the republic, from the Terror to Napoleon’s ascent. Readers familiar with the history of the French Revolution will especially appreciate chapters that pay close attention to the 1790 Civil Constitution of the Clergy and the revolt in the Vendee, issues and events that do not often get the play they may deserve in other surveys. Those who have always wanted to learn about the Revolution will find this book a highly informative and fascinating introduction to historical events and actors that help us understand so much that followed, in France and well beyond its borders. In our interview, Noah and I talk about teaching , the plethora of historical and political interpretations of the French Revolution, and the continuing relevance of that history to a contemporary French republic still struggling with issues of faith, desire, and politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

1hr 3mins

14 Jul 2014

Episode artwork

Noah Shusterman, “The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics” (Routledge, 2013)

New Books in History

This year marks the 225th anniversary of the outbreak of the French Revolution. You don’t have to be a historian to know and appreciate how significant that revolution is to our understanding of French society and culture since the eighteenth century. Noah Shusterman‘s new book, The French Revolution: Faith, Desire, and Politics (Routledge, 2013) is an accessible book that provides readers with an overview of the major events and historical actors who shaped the Revolution from the storming of the Bastille on July 14th, 1789 to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. It is a book that offers a compelling narrative and draws on the vast field of scholarship that has analyzed and interpreted these events for over two centuries.This new study of the French Revolution emphasizes the central roles that religion and gender played as events unfolded, from the “liberal revolution” of 1789 through the emergence of the republic, from the Terror to Napoleon’s ascent. Readers familiar with the history of the French Revolution will especially appreciate chapters that pay close attention to the 1790 Civil Constitution of the Clergy and the revolt in the Vendee, issues and events that do not often get the play they may deserve in other surveys. Those who have always wanted to learn about the Revolution will find this book a highly informative and fascinating introduction to historical events and actors that help us understand so much that followed, in France and well beyond its borders. In our interview, Noah and I talk about teaching , the plethora of historical and political interpretations of the French Revolution, and the continuing relevance of that history to a contemporary French republic still struggling with issues of faith, desire, and politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 3mins

14 Jul 2014