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Heather Mayer

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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What It's Like To Be The Food & Nutrition Editor at Runner's World Magazine-- with Heather Mayer Irvine

Greenletes Podcast

In this episode, Natalie talks with fellow runner Heather Mayer Irvine about all things running and writing! Heather is the former food and nutrition editor at Runner’s World. She chats about  how she got her start in journalism (including self publishing a newspaper at 8 years old) and how she landed her #dreamjob at Runner’s World through Twitter.  I ask Heather how she went about sourcing credible nutrition information and her favorite story that she’s ever written. Heather discusses what it was like to write The Runner’s World Vegetarian Cookbook and what she’s learned about herself through running.Reference: Follow Heather on social media www.instagram.com/runsonfuel or visit her website www.heathermayerirvinwrites.com The Runner’s World Vegetarian Cookbook (affiliate link): https://amzn.to/2PG8obrAnd don’t forget to follow www.instagram.com/greenletes  and visit www.greenletes.com

38mins

8 Mar 2021

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Episode 3: Heather Mayer - Your race, your expectations

Believe. Strive. Achieve. Endurance Podcast

Heather is one of our coached athletes who after doing a wide variety of different sports when she was young, ended up falling in love with triathlon. In this episode, Heather shares with us how she managed her expectations for her first full IRONMAN race and how her mindset helped her recover from a stress fracture. Now, focusing more on cycling, she tells us her story.

22 Jul 2020

Similar People

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Who Were The Women Beyond The Rebel Girl- By Heather Mayer.(null)

Keeping Kurrent

Women had a decisive role to play in the formation of the Industrial Workers of the world (IWW or Wobblies). Writers have often focused on key male figures ;however, Heather Mayer chose to focus on women, single women, families, and husband and wife Wobbly teams. They didn’t just focus on the suffrage movement but … “supported women in their fight for birth control, sexual emancipation and better labor conditions, all gthe while facing persecution at the local, state, and federal levels.”

43mins

23 Dec 2019

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Heather Mayer, "Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924" (Oregon State UP, 2018)

New Books in Gender

The Pacific Northwest was a hotbed of labor radicalism in the early twentieth century, where the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World (commonly known as the “Wobblies”) fought for better working conditions for all workers regardless of race, sex, or creed. The historian Heather Mayer takes a new look at the well-worn vision of the Wobblies as predominately radical young, itinerant men. Her new bookBeyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924 (Oregon State University Press, 2018) finds women played a crucial role in the politics of the union. These women expanded the radical vision of the union beyond the workplace to include birth control, sexual emancipation, and freedom of choice in marriage.Ryan Driskell Tate is a Ph.D. candidate in American history at Rutgers University. He teaches courses on modern US history, environmental history, and histories of labor and capitalism. He is completing a book on energy development in the American West. @rydriskelltate. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

30mins

20 Jun 2019

Most Popular

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Heather Mayer, "Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924" (Oregon State UP, 2018)

New Books in American Studies

The Pacific Northwest was a hotbed of labor radicalism in the early twentieth century, where the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World (commonly known as the “Wobblies”) fought for better working conditions for all workers regardless of race, sex, or creed. The historian Heather Mayer takes a new look at the well-worn vision of the Wobblies as predominately radical young, itinerant men. Her new bookBeyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924 (Oregon State University Press, 2018) finds women played a crucial role in the politics of the union. These women expanded the radical vision of the union beyond the workplace to include birth control, sexual emancipation, and freedom of choice in marriage.Ryan Driskell Tate is a Ph.D. candidate in American history at Rutgers University. He teaches courses on modern US history, environmental history, and histories of labor and capitalism. He is completing a book on energy development in the American West. @rydriskelltate. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

30mins

20 Jun 2019

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Heather Mayer, "Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924" (Oregon State UP, 2018)

New Books in History

The Pacific Northwest was a hotbed of labor radicalism in the early twentieth century, where the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World (commonly known as the “Wobblies”) fought for better working conditions for all workers regardless of race, sex, or creed. The historian Heather Mayer takes a new look at the well-worn vision of the Wobblies as predominately radical young, itinerant men. Her new bookBeyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924 (Oregon State University Press, 2018) finds women played a crucial role in the politics of the union. These women expanded the radical vision of the union beyond the workplace to include birth control, sexual emancipation, and freedom of choice in marriage.Ryan Driskell Tate is a Ph.D. candidate in American history at Rutgers University. He teaches courses on modern US history, environmental history, and histories of labor and capitalism. He is completing a book on energy development in the American West. @rydriskelltate. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

30mins

20 Jun 2019

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Heather Mayer, "Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924" (Oregon State UP, 2018)

New Books in the American West

The Pacific Northwest was a hotbed of labor radicalism in the early twentieth century, where the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World (commonly known as the “Wobblies”) fought for better working conditions for all workers regardless of race, sex, or creed. The historian Heather Mayer takes a new look at the well-worn vision of the Wobblies as predominately radical young, itinerant men. Her new bookBeyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924 (Oregon State University Press, 2018) finds women played a crucial role in the politics of the union. These women expanded the radical vision of the union beyond the workplace to include birth control, sexual emancipation, and freedom of choice in marriage.Ryan Driskell Tate is a Ph.D. candidate in American history at Rutgers University. He teaches courses on modern US history, environmental history, and histories of labor and capitalism. He is completing a book on energy development in the American West. @rydriskelltate. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

30mins

20 Jun 2019

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Heather Mayer - Historian

Working Historians

Dr. Heather Mayer teaches history at Portland Community College and Southern New Hampshire University. In this episode, Dr. Mayer discusses her new book, Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924 and her recent article in the Washington Post. This episode’s recommendations:Heather Mayer, Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924 (Corvallis: Oregon State University Press, 2018): http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/beyond-rebel-girl Heather Mayer, “The Alt-Right Manipulates Free-Speech Rights. We Should Defend Those Rights Anyway,” The Washington Post, August 21, 2018: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/made-by-history/wp/2018/08/21/the-alt-right-manipulates-free-speech-rights-we-should-defend-those-rights-anyway/?utm_term=.a296321ab1b9 #Twitterstorians’ Twitter feeds: Kevin Kruse (@kevinmkruse), Heather Ann Thompson (@hthompsn)Project Recover: https://projectrecover.org/blog/2018/08/15/project-recover-discovers-stern-of-world-war-ii-u-s-destroyer-off-remote-alaskan-island-in-noaa-supported-mission/Laura Alice Watt, The Paradox of Preservation: Wilderness and Working Landscapes at Point Reyes National Seashore (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2017): https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520277083/the-paradox-of-preservationRob’s review of The Paradox of Preservation: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=51931 Rob Denning and James Fennessy can be reached at workinghistorians@gmail.com. Follow us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FilibusterHist.

41mins

20 Sep 2018

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Heather Mayer Irvine Talks About How a Tweet Helped Her Become Nutrition Editor at Runner's World

#WeGotGoals

Company-issued race entries. The chance to interview famous athletes. Monday-morning meetings where everyone compares marathon times - and shelf after shelf of free sample snacks. In some ways, working as the food and nutrition editor at Runner’s World magazine is all Heather Mayer Irvine imagined. And Heather did, indeed, dream of this job for years before she stepped into the role. She studied journalism and nutrition, and has been a runner since high school. Still, she never thought the post attainable - until a hashtag gone viral opened up a door. Listen to the big goals that Heather accomplished and how she got there as well as the goals she's striving for in the future.

27mins

10 May 2017