OwlTail

Cover image of Stephanie Hinnershitz

Stephanie Hinnershitz

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Teaching Japanese American Incarceration with Stephanie Hinnershitz

The Teaching History Her Way Podcast

This week's episode features historian and author Stephanie Hinnershitz.  As we frequently discuss on this podcast, the language we use in our history classrooms is so very important.  Stephanie discusses Japanese American Incarceration-- what it is and why it was incarceration and not just internment.   She also talks about her upcoming book, Japanese American Incarceration: The Camps and Coerced Labor during World War II.  Further, in light of the horrific attacks on our Asian-American brothers and sisters, learning about the accomplishments and racism that has plagued the AAPI community for over a hundred years will help our students understand how we got to where we are in the United States and also build empathy and understanding.Preorder Stephanie's book here: Japanese American IncarcerationThe Camps and Coerced Labor during World War IIStephanie D. HinnershitzStephanie's Twitter handle: @sdhinnershitzLet's be friends!Twitter: @historyherwayInstagram: @teachinghistoryherwayFacebook: www.facebook.com/teachinghistoryherwayWebsite: www.teachinghistoryherway.com

42mins

25 Mar 2021

Episode artwork

Episode 2: Stephanie Hinnershitz - Phyllis Schlafly and the Equal Rights Amendment

Real Issues. Real Conversations. An Ohio Humanities Podcast.

This episode of Real Issues: Real Conversations podcast is one of a number of special episodes that Ohio Humanities is publishing during 2020 to mark 100 years of women’s suffrage in the United States. The 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, was ratified on the 18th of August of 1920. Stephanie Hinnershitz - professor in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences at Cleveland State University - is the guest on this podcast, in which she discusses the history of the Equal Rights Amendment, including Phyllis Schlafly’s very effective campaign against its ratification during the 1970s. Stephanie Hinnershitz is interviewed by folklorist/radio producer Rachel Hopkin. The podcast’s opening and closing music is provided by Sokolovsky Music. Real Issues: Real Conversations is a production of Ohio Humanities, the state-based partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities.  The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment. This podcast is also made possible, in part, through the support of The Ohio State University’s Humanities Institute.

36mins

5 Feb 2020

Similar People

Episode artwork

Stephanie Hinnershitz, “A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South” (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in Law

In her recent book, A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Stephanie Hinnershitz (Cleveland State University) examines the important but overlooked contributions of Asian Americans to civil rights activism in the U.S. South. Hinnershitz takes a thematic focus across the long 20th century to show how Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, and South Asians contested discrimination in land ownership, education, sexual relations and marriage, and business entrepreneurship. From “self-Orientalizing” as non-colored people to invoking their privileges as foreign nationals or refugees, the strategies and arguments that Asian Americans employed in the long and uneven struggle for equality were as varied as they were creative. Hinnershitz uses a wide-ranging source base including legal opinions, newspapers, and oral histories to narrate heartbreaking losses as well as surprising victories, such as the injunction against Klan violence that Vietnamese fishermen won in Texas in 1981. A Different Shade of Justice will interest readers of 20th-century US history, legal history, southern history, and Asian American history. Ian Shin is C3-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer in the History Department at Bates College, where his teaching and research focus on the history of the U.S. in the world and Asian American history. He is currently completing a book manuscript on the politics of Chinese art collecting in the United States in the early 20th century. Ian welcomes listener questions and feedback at kshin@bates.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

1hr 5mins

14 Nov 2017

Episode artwork

Stephanie Hinnershitz, “A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South” (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in Asian American Studies

In her recent book, A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Stephanie Hinnershitz (Cleveland State University) examines the important but overlooked contributions of Asian Americans to civil rights activism in the U.S. South. Hinnershitz takes a thematic focus across the long 20th century to show how Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, and South Asians contested discrimination in land ownership, education, sexual relations and marriage, and business entrepreneurship. From “self-Orientalizing” as non-colored people to invoking their privileges as foreign nationals or refugees, the strategies and arguments that Asian Americans employed in the long and uneven struggle for equality were as varied as they were creative. Hinnershitz uses a wide-ranging source base including legal opinions, newspapers, and oral histories to narrate heartbreaking losses as well as surprising victories, such as the injunction against Klan violence that Vietnamese fishermen won in Texas in 1981. A Different Shade of Justice will interest readers of 20th-century US history, legal history, southern history, and Asian American history. Ian Shin is C3-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer in the History Department at Bates College, where his teaching and research focus on the history of the U.S. in the world and Asian American history. He is currently completing a book manuscript on the politics of Chinese art collecting in the United States in the early 20th century. Ian welcomes listener questions and feedback at kshin@bates.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/asian-american-studies

1hr 5mins

14 Nov 2017

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Stephanie Hinnershitz, “A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South” (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in American Studies

In her recent book, A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Stephanie Hinnershitz (Cleveland State University) examines the important but overlooked contributions of Asian Americans to civil rights activism in the U.S. South. Hinnershitz takes a thematic focus across the long 20th century to show how Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, and South Asians contested discrimination in land ownership, education, sexual relations and marriage, and business entrepreneurship. From “self-Orientalizing” as non-colored people to invoking their privileges as foreign nationals or refugees, the strategies and arguments that Asian Americans employed in the long and uneven struggle for equality were as varied as they were creative. Hinnershitz uses a wide-ranging source base including legal opinions, newspapers, and oral histories to narrate heartbreaking losses as well as surprising victories, such as the injunction against Klan violence that Vietnamese fishermen won in Texas in 1981. A Different Shade of Justice will interest readers of 20th-century US history, legal history, southern history, and Asian American history. Ian Shin is C3-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer in the History Department at Bates College, where his teaching and research focus on the history of the U.S. in the world and Asian American history. He is currently completing a book manuscript on the politics of Chinese art collecting in the United States in the early 20th century. Ian welcomes listener questions and feedback at kshin@bates.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr 5mins

14 Nov 2017

Episode artwork

Stephanie Hinnershitz, “A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South” (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in History

In her recent book, A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Stephanie Hinnershitz (Cleveland State University) examines the important but overlooked contributions of Asian Americans to civil rights activism in the U.S. South. Hinnershitz takes a thematic focus across the long 20th century to show how Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, and South Asians contested discrimination in land ownership, education, sexual relations and marriage, and business entrepreneurship. From “self-Orientalizing” as non-colored people to invoking their privileges as foreign nationals or refugees, the strategies and arguments that Asian Americans employed in the long and uneven struggle for equality were as varied as they were creative. Hinnershitz uses a wide-ranging source base including legal opinions, newspapers, and oral histories to narrate heartbreaking losses as well as surprising victories, such as the injunction against Klan violence that Vietnamese fishermen won in Texas in 1981. A Different Shade of Justice will interest readers of 20th-century US history, legal history, southern history, and Asian American history. Ian Shin is C3-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer in the History Department at Bates College, where his teaching and research focus on the history of the U.S. in the world and Asian American history. He is currently completing a book manuscript on the politics of Chinese art collecting in the United States in the early 20th century. Ian welcomes listener questions and feedback at kshin@bates.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 6mins

14 Nov 2017

Episode artwork

Stephanie Hinnershitz, “A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South” (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in the American South

In her recent book, A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Stephanie Hinnershitz (Cleveland State University) examines the important but overlooked contributions of Asian Americans to civil rights activism in the U.S. South. Hinnershitz takes a thematic focus across the long 20th century to show how Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, and South Asians contested discrimination in land ownership, education, sexual relations and marriage, and business entrepreneurship. From “self-Orientalizing” as non-colored people to invoking their privileges as foreign nationals or refugees, the strategies and arguments that Asian Americans employed in the long and uneven struggle for equality were as varied as they were creative. Hinnershitz uses a wide-ranging source base including legal opinions, newspapers, and oral histories to narrate heartbreaking losses as well as surprising victories, such as the injunction against Klan violence that Vietnamese fishermen won in Texas in 1981. A Different Shade of Justice will interest readers of 20th-century US history, legal history, southern history, and Asian American history. Ian Shin is C3-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer in the History Department at Bates College, where his teaching and research focus on the history of the U.S. in the world and Asian American history. He is currently completing a book manuscript on the politics of Chinese art collecting in the United States in the early 20th century. Ian welcomes listener questions and feedback at kshin@bates.edu. Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

1hr 5mins

14 Nov 2017

Episode artwork

Stephanie Hinnershitz, “A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South” (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in Peoples & Places

In her recent book, A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Stephanie Hinnershitz (Cleveland State University) examines the important but overlooked contributions of Asian Americans to civil…

1hr 3mins

14 Nov 2017

Episode artwork

Stephanie Hinnershitz, “A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South” (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in Politics & Society

In her recent book, A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Stephanie Hinnershitz (Cleveland State University) examines the important but overlooked contributions of Asian Americans to civil…

1hr 3mins

14 Nov 2017