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Stephanie Coontz Podcasts

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11 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Stephanie Coontz. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Stephanie Coontz, often where they are interviewed.

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11 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Stephanie Coontz. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Stephanie Coontz, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Ep. 084 THE EVOLUTION OF MARRIAGE—AND DIVORCE - Stephanie Coontz

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Over the last 40 years, marriage has evolved from an institution based on strict gender roles and specialization to a connection based on friendship and shared interests. Our expectations of marriage have shifted as well, the standards for intimacy rising along with the need to negotiate shared responsibilities. So, how can couples best navigate these new rules? And how does this transition impact societal attitudes toward divorce?

Mar 11 2020 · 24mins
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Stephanie Coontz - Exploring the Meaning of Marriage

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In this episode Mark Groves is joined by Stephanie Coontz, researcher, academic and author of seven books on marriage and family. They explore topics ranging from traditions, gender roles, the evolution of relationships in history and the more recent impacts of technology on relationships.

Stephanie Coontz teaches history and family studies at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA and is Director of Research and Public Education at the Council on Contemporary Families. She has authored seven books on marriage and family life, including A Strange Stirring: ‘The Feminine Mystique’ and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s, The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap. Coontz is a frequent guest columnist for the New York Times and CNN.com. Selected articles and tv appearances can be found at www.stephaniecoontz.com


Highlights

3m30sec: The history of marriage - what was it’s purpose?

8min: The difference between love, relationships and marriage, what is the role of coercion?

20m40sec: What is the history of monogamy and polygamy?

28min: The changing perspectives of being single, partnered, married and what is the role of gender here?

35min: The role of tradition and gender, how does it impact on the happiness of a relationship? How egalitarian are couples and how does this impact on happiness?

42min: Women having the courage to speak out and the #MeToo movement, how the times have changed.

45min: How has technology changed relationships and marriages?

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mar 04 2019 · 55mins

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The Evolution of Marriage—and Divorce with Stephanie Coontz

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Over the last 40 years, marriage has evolved from an institution based on strict gender roles and specialization to a connection based on friendship and shared interests. Our expectations of marriage have shifted as well, the standards for intimacy rising along with the need to negotiate shared responsibilities. So, how can couples best navigate these new rules? And how does this transition impact societal attitudes toward divorce?

Stephanie Coontz is an author and educator in the field of marriage and gender relationships. She teaches history and family studies at The Evergreen State College and serves as Director of the Council on Contemporary Families (CCF). Stephanie has written seven books and published dozens of articles in scholarly journals and popular media, including The New York Times and the Journal of Marriage and Family, among many other publications. She has been honored with The Families & Work Institute’s Work-Life Legacy Award and CCF’s Visionary Leadership Award.

Today, Stephanie joins Katherine to discuss how marriage has evolved over time, explaining the shift from strict gender roles to a bond based on friendship. She describes how couples who share responsibilities of breadwinning, childcare and housework report higher levels of satisfaction and addresses the ways in which old attitudes undermine modern marriages. Stephanie also speaks to the importance of negotiation, gratitude and respect for each other’s bids for connection. Listen in to understand how the feminist movement disrupted the institution of marriage and learn how our rising standards have changed the factors that make a marriage last.

Topics Covered

How marriage has evolved from specialization to sharing
The way old attitudes undermine modern marriages
How sharing responsibilities leads to higher satisfaction
How to consider what’s attracting you to your partner
The role of bids for connection as a predictor of stability
Why modern marriage requires much more negotiation
How the feminist movement served as a disruptor
How our expectations for intimacy have shifted
The destructive nature of holding onto traditional views
The idea of gatekeeping in household/childcare duties
Why the way we fight with our partners is important
Stephanie’s insight around the economy of gratitude
Why attitudes toward divorce do NOT predict behavior

Connect with Stephanie Coontz

Stephanie’s Website: https://www.stephaniecoontz.com/
Council on Contemporary Families: https://contemporaryfamilies.org/

Resources

Philip & Carolyn Cowan’s Research: https://contemporaryfamilies.org/experts/philip-cowan-phd/
Dr. John Gottman: https://www.gottman.com/

Connect with Katherine Miller

The Center for Understanding Conflict: http://understandinginconflict.org/
Miller Law Group: https://westchesterfamilylaw.com/
Katherine on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/kemiller1
The New Yorker’s Guide to Collaborative Divorce by Katherine Miller: https://www.amazon.com/New-Yorkers-Guide-Collaborative-Divorce/dp/0692496246
Email: katherine@westchesterfamilylaw.com
Call (914) 738-7765
Oct 17 2018 · 24mins
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Ep 9: Matrimony Myths with Stephanie Coontz

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You've seen it from rom-coms to Hallmark cards - our society is obsessed with everyone finding their soulmate. But did you know the idea of 'the one' is a relatively new concept in our culture? In fact, marriage and love were completely separate entities

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sep 15 2016 · 47mins

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Marriage: The Way We Never Were - Stephanie Coontz #63

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Couples in the Paleolithic world would never have fantasized about
running off by themselves to their own little retreats in the
forest. No Stone Age lovers would have imagined in their wildest dreams
that they could or should be “everything” to each other. That way lay
death.

― Stephanie Coontz, Marriage, a History: From Obedience to Intimacy

Stephanie Coontz is a marriage historian and author of seven books on
marriage and family life. In this podcast, she takes us on a tour through
the evolution of marriage and intimacy throughout human history. We discuss
everything from egalitarianism to “the one” to polyamory vs. monogamy. This
show is enlightening and adds another piece to the puzzle as we continue to
dissect the mating styles of the human animal, here on the ReWild Yourself!
podcast.

Episode Breakdown:
* The way we never were
* Are we hardwired for egalitarianism?
* The quest for in-laws
* Marrying for love
* The soulmate fantasy
* Individual needs vs group needs
* Sex and marriage throughout history
* Monogamy vs non-monogamy
* The story of divorce over the ages
* Today’s marriage statistics 
* The changing roles of men and women in a marriage
Sep 09 2015 · 1hr 7mins
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Stephanie Coontz, “A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s” (Basic Books, 2014)

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Stephanie Coontz is an award-winning social historian, the director of Research and Public Education at the Council for Contemporary Families and teaches history and family studies at The Evergreen College in Olympia, Washington. In A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s (Basic Books, 2014), Coontz reveals why so many women in the early 1960s found Betty Friedan’s book The Feminine Mystique (1963) speaking to them personally. Freidan identified an unnamed problem allowing women to see the self-doubt and depression they suffered as no longer a personal issue, but a social one. Coontz’s work is both a social history of women at mid-century and a reception history of Friedan’s book: A book regarded as one of the most influential in the twentieth century and a catalyst for the 1960s women’s movement. Coontz’s narrative provides a vivid picture of the realities and the contraction in the post-war lives of many women. She also critically examines Friedan and responds to the charge that the Feminine Mystique was too white and middle class. Including the voices of minority and working class women’s response to the book, Coontz provides a fresh way for understand Friedan’s legacy. This is not a story only trying to make sense of the past, but shows how the feminine mystique in new guises continues to reproduce itself in contemporary society. Consumerism, the search for meaningful work, and equity between men and women both a home and at work, are enduring issues we all continue to contend with.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Feb 06 2015 · 1hr 5mins
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Stephanie Coontz, “A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s” (Basic Books, 2014)

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Stephanie Coontz is an award-winning social historian, the director of Research and Public Education at the Council for Contemporary Families and teaches history and family studies at The Evergreen College in Olympia, Washington. In A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s (Basic Books, 2014), Coontz reveals why so many women in the early 1960s found Betty Friedan’s book The Feminine Mystique (1963) speaking to them personally. Freidan identified an unnamed problem allowing women to see the self-doubt and depression they suffered as no longer a personal issue, but a social one. Coontz’s work is both a social history of women at mid-century and a reception history of Friedan’s book: A book regarded as one of the most influential in the twentieth century and a catalyst for the 1960s women’s movement. Coontz’s narrative provides a vivid picture of the realities and the contraction in the post-war lives of many women. She also critically examines Friedan and responds to the charge that the Feminine Mystique was too white and middle class. Including the voices of minority and working class women’s response to the book, Coontz provides a fresh way for understand Friedan’s legacy. This is not a story only trying to make sense of the past, but shows how the feminine mystique in new guises continues to reproduce itself in contemporary society. Consumerism, the search for meaningful work, and equity between men and women both a home and at work, are enduring issues we all continue to contend with.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Feb 06 2015 · 1hr 5mins
Episode artwork

Stephanie Coontz, “A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s” (Basic Books, 2014)

Play
Read more

Stephanie Coontz is an award-winning social historian, the director of Research and Public Education at the Council for Contemporary Families and teaches history and family studies at The Evergreen College in Olympia, Washington. In A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s (Basic Books, 2014), Coontz reveals why so many women in the early 1960s found Betty Friedan’s book The Feminine Mystique (1963) speaking to them personally. Freidan identified an unnamed problem allowing women to see the self-doubt and depression they suffered as no longer a personal issue, but a social one. Coontz’s work is both a social history of women at mid-century and a reception history of Friedan’s book: A book regarded as one of the most influential in the twentieth century and a catalyst for the 1960s women’s movement. Coontz’s narrative provides a vivid picture of the realities and the contraction in the post-war lives of many women. She also critically examines Friedan and responds to the charge that the Feminine Mystique was too white and middle class. Including the voices of minority and working class women’s response to the book, Coontz provides a fresh way for understand Friedan’s legacy. This is not a story only trying to make sense of the past, but shows how the feminine mystique in new guises continues to reproduce itself in contemporary society. Consumerism, the search for meaningful work, and equity between men and women both a home and at work, are enduring issues we all continue to contend with.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Feb 06 2015 · 1hr 6mins
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Stephanie Coontz, “The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap” (Basic Books, 2000)

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“My mother was a saint.” ” In my time, we pulled ourselves up by our own bootstraps.” “A man’s home is his castle.” “The home is the foundation of society.” These are just some of the romantic catchphrases that are commonly recited by those who claim that things just aren’t like they used to be in the “good old days.” In The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap (Basic Books, 1992/2000), Stephanie Coontz exposes these ideals for what they are: myths that portray an inaccurate perception of the past and hinder current discussions about the present and future. Crime, for instance, declined 20% between 1990 and 1998, and yet the number of murders covered by the media increased by 600%, leading many to believe that we live in a much more dangerous world than before. Other persistent but equally inaccurate myths include the belief that marriage is a dying institution, that black families are always in crisis, and that single parent-families produce dysfunctional children. Coontz also demonstrates that the 1950s, far from being the traditional norm for family relations in America, was actually a very unusual decade. In addition, she argues that what is believed to be natural and innate when it comes to gender roles is actually socially constructed, and that the notion of men as the breadwinners and women as homemakers is the result of a historical process.


The Way We Never Were is meticulously researched and offers a comprehensive view of the American family throughout the 1900s. It also effectively highlights the importance of not allowing feelings of nostalgia to skew our view of the past. The past, like everything else that is no more, can be easily idealized, but believing in a reality that never was can hamper the ability to deal with the reality that currently is.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

May 10 2012 · 47mins
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Stephanie Coontz, “The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap” (Basic Books, 2000)

Play
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“My mother was a saint.” ” In my time, we pulled ourselves up by our own bootstraps.” “A man’s home is his castle.” “The home is the foundation of society.” These are just some of the romantic catchphrases that are commonly recited by those who claim that things just aren’t like they used to be in the “good old days.” In The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap (Basic Books, 1992/2000), Stephanie Coontz exposes these ideals for what they are: myths that portray an inaccurate perception of the past and hinder current discussions about the present and future. Crime, for instance, declined 20% between 1990 and 1998, and yet the number of murders covered by the media increased by 600%, leading many to believe that we live in a much more dangerous world than before. Other persistent but equally inaccurate myths include the belief that marriage is a dying institution, that black families are always in crisis, and that single parent-families produce dysfunctional children. Coontz also demonstrates that the 1950s, far from being the traditional norm for family relations in America, was actually a very unusual decade. In addition, she argues that what is believed to be natural and innate when it comes to gender roles is actually socially constructed, and that the notion of men as the breadwinners and women as homemakers is the result of a historical process.


The Way We Never Were is meticulously researched and offers a comprehensive view of the American family throughout the 1900s. It also effectively highlights the importance of not allowing feelings of nostalgia to skew our view of the past. The past, like everything else that is no more, can be easily idealized, but believing in a reality that never was can hamper the ability to deal with the reality that currently is.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

May 10 2012 · 47mins
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