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17 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Eric Schwitzgebel. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Eric Schwitzgebel, often where they are interviewed.

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17 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Eric Schwitzgebel. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Eric Schwitzgebel, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

#095 - Breaking the Overton Window (Eric Schwitzgebel)

Renegade Ape - Psychology, Philosophy, and the Overton Wasteland
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Prof. Eric Schwitzgebel joins us to discuss the concept of the "Overton Window" and the potential consequences of engaging in unacceptable discourse.

Buy Eric's Book, "A Theory of Jerks and Other Philosophical Misadventures": https://amzn.to/3d2LKjw

Eric's Blog: http://schwitzsplinters.blogspot.com/

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/renegadeape

Music: "Monkey Business" by Mike Franklyn https://www.epidemicsound.com/track/nc340keROg

Jun 13 2020

1hr 24mins

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The Unreliability of Naive Introspection by Eric Schwitzgebel

Journal Entries
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How well do you know your own feelings? Is our ability to know this about ourselves less reliable than what we know about the outside world around us? Is there anything we can do to make ourselves less "naive" and improve the reliability of introspection about conscious experiences?

Links and Resources

Paper Quotes

Descartes, I think, had it quite backwards when he said the mind—including especially current conscious experience—was better known than the outside world. The teetering stacks of paper around me, I’m quite sure of. My visual experience as I look at those papers, my emotional experience as I contemplate the mess, my cognitive phenomenology as I drift in thought, staring at them—of these, I’m much less certain. My experiences flee and scatter as I reflect. I feel unpracticed, poorly equipped with the tools, categories, and skills that might help me dissect them.
They are gelatinous, disjointed, swift, shy, changeable. They are at once familiar and alien.

I know better what’s in the burrito I’m eating than I know my gustatory experience as I eat it. I know it has cheese. In describing my experience, I resort to saying, vaguely, that the burrito tastes “cheesy,” without any very clear idea what this involves. Maybe, in fact, I’m just— or partly—inferring: The thing has cheese, so I must be having a taste experience of “cheesiness.” Maybe also, if I know that the object I’m seeing is evenly red, I’ll infer a visual experience of uniform “redness” as I look at it. Or if I know that weeding is unpleasant work, I’ll infer a negative emotion as I do it. Indeed, it can make great sense as a general strategy to start with judgments about plain, easily knowable facts of the outside world, then infer to what is more foreign and elusive, our consciousness as we experience that world. I doubt we can fully disentangle such inferences from more “genuinely introspective”
processes.

Special Guest: Eric Schwitzgebel.

Apr 08 2020

30mins

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Conversations #9 - Eric Schwitzgebel

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A conversation with Professor of Philosophy, Eric Schwitzgebel—

This month, I sat down with Professor of Philosophy at the University of California - Riverside - Eric Schwitzgebel. Along with teaching, Eric is a prolific writer who since 2006 has written over 1000 posts about numerous subjects on his blog “The Splintered Mind.” His most recent book: A Theory of Jerks and other Philosophical Misadventures is a collection of 68 of Eric’s favorites.

Our conversation was as wide ranging as his resume and research. We talked about his personal history towards a academic career in philosophy. Being influenced as a grad student under John Searle of “The Chinese Room” thought experiment fame. Eric’s dad had a similar trajectory as he worked under Timothy Leary for the famous Harvard LSD studies.

We discussed the utility of philosophy, moral psychology, and went deep into many of the questions pertaining to consciousness. Our discussion featured his past research on ethics of ethics professors, complex mating dances of garden snails, and ancient Chinese philosophy. We also touched on the reconnection of psychology and philosophy in the last 20 years, and teaching evil earlier in the semester to his students.

I thank Eric for his time, research, and eclectic mind. Enjoy the conversation, and until next time - Ad Astra!

--


Timestamps:

- Eric’s dad was a grad student in the famous Harvard (Timothy Leary & Ram Das) LSD Studies, and invented the ankle monitoring system for arrestees (00:05:13)


- Eric did his post graduate work at UC Berkley under John Searle of “The Chinese Room” thought experiment fame - a critique of “The Turing Test” (00:13:59)


- What exactly is consciousness? (00:18:20)


- Can collectives, societies, companies, ideas, or countries like the United States be conscious? (00:22:45)


- Eric’s thoughts on Object Oriented Ontology and speculative realism (00:26:37)


- Unknown Unknowns, and the quest for consilience, and the Fermi paradox (00:35:16)


Part Two:

- Philosophical outlook on altered states of consciousness (00:44:02)


- The great debate between Mengzi & Xunzi about whether human nature is good or evil. (00:48:06)


- Science fiction as a philosophy & ethics of technology (01:02:22)


- Upcoming anthology: “Philosophy through science fiction stories” (01:06:31)


- Discussing films Ex Machina & Arrival (01:10:54)


- The bizarre, weird, and complex lives of garden snails (01:16:09)


- The love of writing, running a blog called “The Splintered Mind,” and everyone is really a philosopher and interested in the deepest mysteries of existence (01:23:40)


- Eric’s new book: “A Theory of Jerks and other Philosophical Misadventures" (01:30:21)


- Recommending Zhuangzi (Butterfly Dream) and John Stuart Mill (On Liberty) and Montaigne (Personal essays like On Solitude) (01:39:50)


- What can we gain philosophically from the idea of the “The Overview Effect?” (01:56:34)

More on Eric Schwitzgebel:

Eric’s Book: https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/theory-jerks-and-other-philosophical-misadventures

Eric’s Website: https://faculty.ucr.edu/~eschwitz/

Eric’s blog “The Splintered Mind”: https://schwitzsplinters.blogspot.com/

Eric’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/eschwitz?lang=en

--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/eclecticspacewalk/support

Mar 16 2020

2hr 4mins

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Gaze of Robot, Gaze of Bird by Eric Schwitzgebel (audio)

Clarkesworld Magazine - Science Fiction & Fantasy
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This episode features "Gaze of Robot, Gaze of Bird" written by Eric Schwitzgebel. Published in the April 2019 issue of Clarkesworld Magazine and read by Kate Baker.

The text version of this story can be found at:
http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/schwitzgebel_04_19

Support us on Patreon at http://patreon.com/clarkesworld

Apr 29 2019

43mins

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#079 - How Little Thou Can Know Thyself (Prof. Eric Schwitzgebel)

Renegade Ape - Psychology, Philosophy, and the Overton Wasteland
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In today's episode we discuss the nature of introspection with Prof. Eric Schwitzgebel and his contention that we can never reliably grasp the true nature of our inner selves.

We explore the inadequacies of our imaginary, emotional, and visual experience, the implications of these shortcomings for things like happiness and mental health, and whether or not introspection is something we can learn to do better.

SUPPORT US ON PATREON

http://patreon.com/mowe

SHOW NOTES

https://mowe.blog/podcast/how-little-thou-can-know-thyself/

BOOKS MENTIONED

"A Theory of Jerks and Other Philosophical Misadventures" by Eric Schwitzgebel https://amzn.to/2UbGeWk

"Perplexities of Consciousness" by Eric Schwitzgebel https://amzn.to/2U6SrLY

"Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic" by Eric Schwitzgebel & Russell T. Hurlburt https://amzn.to/2FzxG2v

"Labyrinths" by Jorge Luis Borges https://amzn.to/2WpLYJP

SOCIAL MEDIA

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CREDITS

Theme Music: Falling Down by Ryan Little http://youtube.com/user/TheR4C2010

Elevator Music: "Local Forecast - Elevator" by Kevin MacLeod http://incompetech.com

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DISCLAIMER: My Own Worst Enemy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk and affiliated sites.

Mar 24 2019

1hr 26mins

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Rationally Speaking #196 - Eric Schwitzgebel on "Weird ideas and opaque minds"

Rationally Speaking Podcast
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Philosopher Eric Schwitzgebel returns to the show to explore several related questions: His taxonomy of the three different styles of thinker -- "Truth," "Dare," and "Wonder" -- and whether one of them is better than the others. His case for why it's bad to interpret people "charitably." And his seemingly paradoxical claim that we are frequently wrong about our own conscious experience.

Oct 30 2017

1hr 5mins

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Little /^^^\&- by Eric Schwitzgebel (audio)

Clarkesworld Magazine - Science Fiction & Fantasy
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This episode features "Little /^^^\&-" written by Eric Schwitzgebel. Published in the September 2017 issue of Clarkesworld Magazine and read by Kate Baker.

The text version of this story can be found at:
http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/schwitzgebel_09_17

Support us on Patreon at http://patreon.com/clarkesworld

Sep 22 2017

47mins

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Rationally Speaking #166 - Eric Schwitzgebel on "Why you should expect the truth to be crazy"

Rationally Speaking Podcast
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Some theories violate common sense so wildly that you want to just reject them out of hand. For example, "The United States is conscious," or "The most moral act would be to replace all living beings with an orgasmic blob." On the other hand, many theories in physics that sounded similarly crazy turned out to be very well-supported (think of quantum theory, or relativity). So what role should "common sense" play in evaluating new theories? This episode features a discussion with philosopher Eric Schwitzgebel on his theory of "Crazyism," that we should expect the truth to be at least a little bit crazy.

Aug 21 2016

53mins

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Fish Dance by Eric Schwitzgebel (audio)

Clarkesworld Magazine - Science Fiction & Fantasy
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Our second podcast for July is “Fish Dance” written by Eric Schwitzgebel and read by Kate Baker.

Subscribe to our podcast.

Jul 18 2016

38mins

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Episode 77: On the Moral Nature of Nazis, Jerks, and Ethicists (with Eric Schwitzgebel)

Very Bad Wizards
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Special guest Eric Schwitzgebel joins David and Tamler to discuss the moral behavior (or lack thereof) of ethicists. Does moral reflection make us better people, or does it just give us better excuses to be immoral? Who's more right about human nature--Mencius or Xun Zi? What did Kant have against bastards and masturbating? Plus, we talk about jerks, robot cars, and killing baby Hitler. (Godwin's Law within 1:42--might be a new record for us). 

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Special Guest: Eric Schwitzgebel.

Support Very Bad Wizards

Nov 09 2015

1hr 20mins

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