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Rosalind Franklin Podcasts

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24 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Rosalind Franklin. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Rosalind Franklin, often where they are interviewed.

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24 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Rosalind Franklin. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Rosalind Franklin, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Babbage: Rosalind Franklin

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Podcast: Economist Radio
Episode: Babbage: Rosalind Franklin
Pub date: 2020-09-16

100 years after the British scientist Rosalind Franklin's birth, The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder explores her scientific achievements—from photographing the double helix of DNA to discovering the first three-dimensional structure of a virus. And, how does Franklin’s work help the study of covid-19?


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Sep 16 2020 · 27mins
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Babbage: Rosalind Franklin

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100 years after the British scientist Rosalind Franklin's birth, The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder explores her scientific achievements—from photographing the double helix of DNA to discovering the first three-dimensional structure of a virus. And, how does Franklin’s work help the study of covid-19?


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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Sep 16 2020 · 27mins
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Rosalind Franklin

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Back in the early 1950s, there was a race to discover DNA. When it was over, three men would be awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Overlooked at the time was a remarkable chemist and crystallographer Rosalind Franklin. Today I have this woman’s story!

Links to the Sources I used:
Rosalind Franklin - Wikipedia
Rosalind Elsie Franklin Pioneer Molecular Biologist
Dr. Rosalind Franklin - RosalindFranklin University
25 Minute Rosalind Franklin Biography DNA: Secret of Photo 51
Aaron Klug - Rosalind Franklin and the discovery of DNA
Rosalind Franklin (In Our Time)
DNA - Episode 1 of 5: The Secret of Life - PBS Documentary
The DNA Double Helix Discovery — HHMI BioInteractive Video

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Sep 06 2020 · 29mins
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Episode 6 – Rosalind Franklin: The Undiscovered Discoverer of DNA

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In this episode of Great Woman Theory, our hosts and special guest Amy Bradshaw discuss the life and work of Rosalind Franklin, gifted chemist and researcher behind one of the greatest scientific discoveries of the 20th Century, the structure of DNA. Following what would have been her 100th birthday, we celebrate her life and work, … Continue reading Episode 6 – Rosalind Franklin: The Undiscovered Discoverer of DNA →

Aug 31 2020 ·
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Rosalind Franklin: The Woman Who Shaped DNA

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You know when you share a really great idea in a meeting, only for the guy next to you to say the same thing, only louder? 

Cue the applause. “Wow, Greg, what a great and novel idea!”

It’s enough to make you want to bang your head on the desk. Our girl Rosalind Franklin knows all about others taking the credit for her work. She was the first person to identify that DNA was shaped like a double helix - an amazing achievement. 

The only problem? The world at the time… didn’t really care that she was first. 

This episode is a ripper, but a warning: you might want to bring your stress ball. 

About this podcast: 

Fierce Females of History is a dive into the stories of awesome women through history you should know about. 

A quick disclaimer: we’re journalists, not historians, but we do love our history. Tune in every week as one of our three hosts shares the story of one woman. 

Hosts: 

Talissa Bazaz (@talissabazaz)

Erin Ramsay (@erin_ramsay)

Lucy Dean (@lucyintheskywithcarbon)

Follow us: 

Fierce Females of History is on Instagram: @fiercefemalespodcast

Get in touch:

Want to discuss history, wine, the Hulk’s penis or geese? 

Drop us a line here: fiercefemalesofhistory@gmail.com

Theme music: Get Lo - LynneMusic

https://www.neosounds.com/songs/15504

Want to know more about Rosalind? 

Don’t forget about her. Here’s where Talissa did her reading.


See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 25 2020 · 27mins
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Science Museum mystery objects; home security camera security and Rosalind Franklin at 100

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The Science Museum Group looks after over 7.3 million items. As with most museums, the objects you see on display when you visit are only the tip of the iceberg of the entire collection. Up until now, many of the remaining 300,000 objects have been stored in Blythe House in London. But now the collection is being moved to a purpose-built warehouse in Wiltshire. The move is a perfect opportunity for curators to see what’s there, re-catalogue long hidden gems and to conserve and care for their treasures. But during the process they have discovered a number of unidentified items that have been mislabelled or not catalogued properly in the past and some of them are just so mysterious, or esoteric, that the Science Museum needs the aid of the public to help identify them, and their uses. We’ll be showcasing items over the next weeks and months, but this week, Jessica Bradford, the keeper of collection engagement at the Science Museum is asking Inside Science listeners if they recognise, or can shed light on the possible use of the ‘scoop’ in the picture above.
Send suggestions to Email: bbcinsidescience@bbc.co.uk or mysteryobject@sciencemuseum.ac.uk

People install and use home security cameras for peace of mind. But the very behaviour of the commonly used IP home security cameras (internet-connected security cameras) could be giving away important information about your household to potential burglars. Gareth Tyson, at Queen Mary University London, has been working with researchers in China to explore how we use these home security camera systems and to look for flaws in the security of security cameras.

Last Saturday, 25th July, was a hundred years since the birth of chemist Rosalind Franklin. She is perhaps most famous for her work using X-ray crystallography which helped lead to the discovery of the double helix structure of DNA, a contribution for which she was not credited at the time. But there’s so much more to the scientific story of her life than just being the wronged woman in the DNA story, who died tragically young at the age of just 37. She pioneered work in the coal industry and on the structure of viruses, including the polio virus. And Franklin’s work has resonance today, in this era of COVID-19. Baroness Nicola Blackwood, chair of Genomics England thinks Rosalind Franklin’s legacy is something we should be very proud of today.

Presenter - Gareth Mitchell
Producers - Fiona Roberts and Beth Eastwood
Jul 30 2020 · 31mins
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S1E2 -002 - Rosalind Franklin

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In our second episode, we discuss the misogyny and sexism inherent to 1950’s academia as we explore the life of Rosalind Franklin -- a truly tenacious scientist whose contributions were at the heart of James Watson and Francis Crick’s Nobel Prize-winning work on DNA.

Sources:
Rosalind Franklin on Wikipedia U.S. National Library of Medicine Biography The Rosalind Franklin Papers

READING LIST:
Jenifer Glynn | My Sister Rosalind Franklin | (Oxford University Press, 2012)
Kersten T. Hall | The Man in the Monkeynut Coat: William Astbury and the Forgotten Road to the Double-Helix | (Oxford University Press, 2014)
Brenda Maddox | Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA | (HarperCollins, 2002)
Anne Sayre | Rosalind Franklin and DNA | (first published 1975; W. W. Norton, 2000)
James D. Watson | The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA | (first published 1968; W&N, 2010)

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Jun 23 2020 · 1hr 31mins
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SCIENTIST & COMPUTER ENGINEER: Rosalind Franklin & Raye Montague

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The final episode of season 2 features a "Dear White People" moment. Then Rita takes on Rosalind Franklin, a science pioneer whose accomplishments in life were stolen by her male colleagues. Raye Montague worked for the U.S. Navy, shattering glass ceilings as she took on racism and sexism to become the first person to ever design a ship via computer programming.

Check out our Instagram highlights to find dozens of Black podcasts. Donate:

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Jun 19 2020 · 1hr 27mins
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Episode 3: Rosalind Franklin - Double Helix, Double Crossed

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DNA - the building block of life itself. One of the greatest scientific discoveries of biology. And its iconic double helix structure was discovered by, of course, Watson and Crick... except for the fact that it absolutely wasn't. Rosalind Franklin was a Jewish woman who, in addition to being a child prodigy, saved lives during The Blitz, housed child refugees, and took one of science's most important photographs. Join us this week on STEMs and Seeds while we explore Rosalind Franklin's life!

SOURCES:

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(12)60452-8/fulltext
The Double Helix, by James Watson
Rosalind Franklin, the Dark Lady of DNA, by Brenda Maddox
(which is only, like $3 as an eBook, by the way, you should check it out)
A Life Story: Rosalind Franklin, by Michael Ford

CREDITS:

"StompDance" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
"Rollin at 5" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
"Giant Wyrm" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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Mar 12 2020 · 1hr
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Rosalind Franklin vs. James Watson

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In 1953, the structure of DNA was supposedly found by Francis Crick and James Watson. But did you know there were two other scientists working on the structure of DNA at the time, including a woman? Her name was Rosalind Franklin, and in this podcast, we discuss why Franklin didn't receive a Nobel prize for her work, as well as her life as a woman. We also discuss the life of James Watson and his controversial opinions. 

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Nov 14 2019 · 36mins
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