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Jesmyn Ward

36 Podcast Episodes

Latest 25 Jul 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Late Night Lit: Maggie O'Farrell | Jesmyn Ward

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

On today's episode of our books podcast, Late Night's Sarah Jenks-Daly speaks with Maggie O'Farrell, award-winning novelist and author of Hamnet.She also talks to two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward to discuss her new monthly book club with Literati.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

33mins

28 Jun 2021

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Jesmyn Ward (Rebroadcast)

The Archive Project

In this episode, we feature Jesmyn Ward. On November 15, 2017, Jesmyn Ward became the only woman ever to win the Nation Book Award twice. She won the award for Fiction in 2011 for her novel Salvage the Bones, and then again for Sing, Unburied, Sing. This is one of those talks that is so powerful that audience members who attended the live event reported feeling transformed. Ward’s storytelling is, by turns, wide and historic, narrow, and deeply personal. She recounts parts of her early life in which so many of the men in her community—brothers, cousins, friends—were killed, and connects these tragedies with the larger tragedies of slavery, segregation, Jim Crow, and mass incarceration. She talks about the recent birth of her son and the dangers he faces simply by being Black and male in America. Ultimately, Ward answers the question about why she is a writer: That she hopes her writing helps people see her son not as a “tool, a type, or a terror,” but as a human being, and that, just as she does here, she seeks to tell stories that make us real to each other, with all that hope entails. “I…thought of the little boy swimming inside of me. And then I thought of the men I know from my small community, DeLisle, Mississippi, who have died young. There are many. There are too many… The pain of their absence walks with their loved ones, beneath the humid Mississippi sky, the bowing pines, the reaching oak. We walk hand-in-hand in the American South. Phantom children. Ghostly siblings. Specter friends.” Jesmyn Ward received her MFA from the University of Michigan and has received the MacArthur Genius Grant, a Stegner Fellowship, a John and Renee Grisham Writers Residency, and the Strauss Living Prize. She is the winner of two National Book Awards for Fiction for Sing, Unburied, Sing (2017) and Salvage the Bones (2011). She is also the author of the novel Where the Line Bleeds and the memoir Men We Reaped, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and won the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize and the Media for a Just Society Award. She is currently an associate professor of creative writing at Tulane University and lives in Mississippi.

51mins

21 Jun 2021

Similar People

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Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward (Book Review)

Everybody Book

Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward (Book Review)--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

5mins

17 Mar 2021

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February's Book: Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward

WhatstheTbookclub

What's the "T"? I provide you all with my "T" on February's novel, Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward. Here's my insight on two prominent themes I relate to from the novel. Additionally, I discuss March's novel. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whatsthetbookclub/message

9mins

28 Feb 2021

Most Popular

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The Mississippi Arts Hour | Jesmyn Ward

Mississippi Arts Hour

Leslie Barker talks with this year’s Governor’s Arts Awards honoree for Excellence in Literature, Jesmyn Ward. The first woman to win the National Book Award twice, a recipient of a McArthur Genius Grant, and one of Time Magazine’s Most Influential People of 2018, Ward’s writing pulls deeply from her Mississippi roots. It’s a conversation about storytelling, community, education, and life in DeLisle, MississippiPhoto Credit: Beowulf Sheehan See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

48mins

14 Feb 2021

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Jesmyn Ward

The Archive Project

In this episode, we feature Jesmyn Ward. On November 15, 2017, Jesmyn Ward became the only woman ever to win the Nation Book Award twice. She won the award for Fiction in 2011 for her novel Salvage the Bones, and then again for Sing, Unburied, Sing. This is one of those talks that is so powerful that audience members who attended the live event reported feeling transformed. Ward’s storytelling is, by turns, wide and historic, narrow, and deeply personal. She recounts parts of her early life in which so many of the men in her community—brothers, cousins, friends—were killed, and connects these tragedies with the larger tragedies of slavery, segregation, Jim Crow, and mass incarceration. She talks about the recent birth of her son and the dangers he faces simply by being Black and male in America. Ultimately, Ward answers the question about why she is a writer: That she hopes her writing helps people see her son not as a “tool, a type, or a terror,” but as a human being, and that, just as she does here, she seeks to tell stories that make us real to each other, with all that hope entails. “I…thought of the little boy swimming inside of me. And then I thought of the men I know from my small community, DeLisle, Mississippi, who have died young. There are many. There are too many… The pain of their absence walks with their loved ones, beneath the humid Mississippi sky, the bowing pines, the reaching oak. We walk hand-in-hand in the American South. Phantom children. Ghostly siblings. Specter friends.” Jesmyn Ward received her MFA from the University of Michigan and has received the MacArthur Genius Grant, a Stegner Fellowship, a John and Renee Grisham Writers Residency, and the Strauss Living Prize. She is the winner of two National Book Awards for Fiction for Sing, Unburied, Sing (2017) and Salvage the Bones (2011). She is also the author of the novel Where the Line Bleeds and the memoir Men We Reaped, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and won the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize and the Media for a Just Society Award. She is currently an associate professor of creative writing at Tulane University and lives in Mississippi.

51mins

8 Feb 2021

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Mitchell Jackson & Jesmyn Ward (Rebroadcast)

The Archive Project

Jesmyn Ward is the author of the National Book Award-winning novels Sing, Unburied, Sing and Salvage the Bones, and the National Book Critics Circle Award-winning memoir Men We Reaped. Ward is in conversation with Mitchell S. Jackson, Whiting Award-winner, native Portlander, and author of the novel The Residue Years and nonfiction book Survival Math (forthcoming 2019). Both Ward and Jackson address the uncomfortable realities of the black experience in America in their work. In this conversation between real-life friends and colleagues, Ward and Jackson seriously discuss the issues of systemic racism, poverty, and violence that are central to their works. Despite the weight of these topics, the intimacy and comfort between the authors creates a light and even humorous discussion. In this episode, Ward and Jackson invite us not only to think, but to laugh with them as well. Jesmyn Ward is a two-time National Book Award winner, a MacArthur Genius, and a recipient of the Strauss Living Award. She is the author of Where the Line Bleeds, Salvage the Bones, Men We Reaped, and Sing, Unburied, Sing, and editor of The Fire This Time. She teaches creative writing at Tulane University. Whiting Award winner Mitchell S. Jackson’s debut novel The Residue Years won The Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence and was a finalist for The Center for Fiction Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize, the PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Fiction, and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Jackson’s honors include fellowships from Lannan Foundation, Ford Foundation, PEN America, TED, NYFA, and The Center for Fiction. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New Yorker, Harpers, The New York Times Book Review, The Paris Review, The Guardian, and Tin House. His newest is the nonfiction book Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family. He is a Clinical Associate Professor of writing in Liberal Studies at New York University. The post Mitchell Jackson & Jesmyn Ward (Rebroadcast) appeared first on Literary Arts.

56mins

29 Jul 2020

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Navigating Transitions in Unpredictable Times with Erica Williams Simon

Women Amplified

Making a career pivot can be scary and paralyzing, especially when events transpire that force an unexpected transition. Covid-19 has left many with lost jobs and time to reflect and reevaluate life and priorities. Others are struggling to succeed at remote work with a disrupted structure and, in many cases, no available childcare. In this […] The post Navigating Transitions in Unpredictable Times with Erica Williams Simon appeared first on The Conferences for Women.

9 Jul 2020

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Jesmyn Ward

Art Works Podcast

Today, we re-visit a discussion with two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward about her memoir Men We Reaped. In her memoir, Jesmyn attempts to understand the death of five young black men, including her beloved brother Joshua. But more broadly, her subject is what it means to be a black man in the south. Jesmyn uses her formidable literary skill to give voice and texture to poor, rural, black Mississippians struggling against poverty and racism in a world with no forgiveness. It’s an important and beautifully-written work with much to teach us today. And, Jesmyn Ward is as clear-eyed and thoughtful in discussion as she is in her writing.

4 Jun 2020

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Men We Reaped: A Memoir by Jesmyn Ward

Lit Society: Books and Drama

Growing up in rural Mississippi, one woman watches helplessly as five men close to her die over the span of 5 years. Through the pain and confusion, she sees clearly what facilitated the demise of each family member and friend — a system built on the foundations of racism and economic turmoil. She decides to tell their stories. Her writing is evidence that these living, loving bodies existed. Before covering this week's book, we're getting into a topic close to home — how to cope with grief. Feel that gaping hole in your stomach, the ache that just won't go away? It may be grief. We'll share with you what's helped us make it through some of the worse moments of our lives. Find Alexis and Kari online: Instagram — www.instagram.com/litsocietypod/; Twitter — twitter.com/litsocietypod; Facebook — www.facebook.com/LitSocietyPod/; and our website www.LitSocietyPod.com. Get in on the conversation by using #booksanddrama.

1hr 9mins

4 Jun 2020

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