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Simone De Beauvoir Podcasts

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22 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Simone De Beauvoir. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Simone De Beauvoir, often where they are interviewed.

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22 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Simone De Beauvoir. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Simone De Beauvoir, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Judith G. Coffin, "Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir" (Cornell UP, 2020)

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Podcast: New Books Network
Episode: Judith G. Coffin, "Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir" (Cornell UP, 2020)
Pub date: 2020-10-26

When Judith G. Coffin discovered a virtually unexplored treasure trove of letters to Simone de Beauvoir from Beauvoir's international readers, it inspired Coffin to explore the intimate bond between the famed author and her reading public. This correspondence, at the heart of Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir (Cornell UP, 2020), immerses us in the tumultuous decades from the late 1940s to the 1970s—from the painful aftermath of World War II to the horror and shame of French colonial brutality in Algeria and through the dilemmas and exhilarations of the early gay liberation and feminist movements. The letters also provide a glimpse into the power of reading and the power of readers to seduce their favorite authors. Sex, Love, and Letters lays bare the private lives and political emotions of the letter writers and of Beauvoir herself. Her readers did not simply pen fan letters but, as Coffin shows, engaged in a dialogue that revealed intellectual and literary life to be a joint and collaborative production. "This must happen to you often, doesn't it?" wrote one. "That people write to you and tell you about their lives?"

Judith G. Coffin is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. She teaches modern European history, including courses on the French Revolution, World Wars 1 and 2, Postwar Europe as well as courses on gender and sexuality. She has written The Politics of Women’s Work: The Paris Garment Trades (Princeton UP, 1996), the modern half of W.W. Norton’s Western Civilizations (New York, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2011) and a series of articles from her book. “Historicizing The Second Sex,” French Politics, Culture & Society 25, 3 (Winter 2007); “Beauvoir, Kinsey, and Mid-Century Sex,” French Politics, Culture, and Society 28, 2 (summer, 2010); “Opinion and Desire: Polling Women in Postwar France” in Kerstin Bruckweh, ed. The Voice of the Citizen Consumer (Oxford University Press, 2011); and "Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir," American Historical Review October, 2010. She is also writing about the histories of psychoanalysis and radio (“The Adventure of the Interior: Menie Grégoire’s Radio Broadcasts.”), and has taught graduate classes in the history of radio, publicity, and privacy.

She lived three years in Paris, got her PhD at Yale, taught at Harvard and UC Riverside; she's been a fellow at NYU and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; her husband is Professor and Dean for Research at the UT School of Law; her children are in their twenties, and she is happiest in the winter in Austin and when visiting the Hill Country.

Julia Gossard is Assistant Professor of History at Utah State University and learned quite a bit about gender, psychoanalysis, and feminist studies from Judy as a student at UT-Austin

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Oct 26 2020 · 40mins
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Judith G. Coffin, "Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir" (Cornell UP, 2020)

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When Judith G. Coffin discovered a virtually unexplored treasure trove of letters to Simone de Beauvoir from Beauvoir's international readers, it inspired Coffin to explore the intimate bond between the famed author and her reading public. This correspondence, at the heart of Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir (Cornell UP, 2020), immerses us in the tumultuous decades from the late 1940s to the 1970s—from the painful aftermath of World War II to the horror and shame of French colonial brutality in Algeria and through the dilemmas and exhilarations of the early gay liberation and feminist movements. The letters also provide a glimpse into the power of reading and the power of readers to seduce their favorite authors. Sex, Love, and Letters lays bare the private lives and political emotions of the letter writers and of Beauvoir herself. Her readers did not simply pen fan letters but, as Coffin shows, engaged in a dialogue that revealed intellectual and literary life to be a joint and collaborative production. "This must happen to you often, doesn't it?" wrote one. "That people write to you and tell you about their lives?"

Judith G. Coffin is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. She teaches modern European history, including courses on the French Revolution, World Wars 1 and 2, Postwar Europe as well as courses on gender and sexuality. She has written The Politics of Women’s Work: The Paris Garment Trades (Princeton UP, 1996), the modern half of W.W. Norton’s Western Civilizations (New York, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2011) and a series of articles from her book. “Historicizing The Second Sex,” French Politics, Culture & Society 25, 3 (Winter 2007); “Beauvoir, Kinsey, and Mid-Century Sex,” French Politics, Culture, and Society 28, 2 (summer, 2010); “Opinion and Desire: Polling Women in Postwar France” in Kerstin Bruckweh, ed. The Voice of the Citizen Consumer (Oxford University Press, 2011); and "Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir," American Historical Review October, 2010. She is also writing about the histories of psychoanalysis and radio (“The Adventure of the Interior: Menie Grégoire’s Radio Broadcasts.”), and has taught graduate classes in the history of radio, publicity, and privacy.

She lived three years in Paris, got her PhD at Yale, taught at Harvard and UC Riverside; she's been a fellow at NYU and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; her husband is Professor and Dean for Research at the UT School of Law; her children are in their twenties, and she is happiest in the winter in Austin and when visiting the Hill Country.

Julia Gossard is Assistant Professor of History at Utah State University and learned quite a bit about gender, psychoanalysis, and feminist studies from Judy as a student at UT-Austin

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 26 2020 · 40mins
Episode artwork

Judith G. Coffin, "Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir" (Cornell UP, 2020)

Play
Read more

When Judith G. Coffin discovered a virtually unexplored treasure trove of letters to Simone de Beauvoir from Beauvoir's international readers, it inspired Coffin to explore the intimate bond between the famed author and her reading public. This correspondence, at the heart of Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir (Cornell UP, 2020), immerses us in the tumultuous decades from the late 1940s to the 1970s—from the painful aftermath of World War II to the horror and shame of French colonial brutality in Algeria and through the dilemmas and exhilarations of the early gay liberation and feminist movements. The letters also provide a glimpse into the power of reading and the power of readers to seduce their favorite authors. Sex, Love, and Letters lays bare the private lives and political emotions of the letter writers and of Beauvoir herself. Her readers did not simply pen fan letters but, as Coffin shows, engaged in a dialogue that revealed intellectual and literary life to be a joint and collaborative production. "This must happen to you often, doesn't it?" wrote one. "That people write to you and tell you about their lives?"

Judith G. Coffin is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. She teaches modern European history, including courses on the French Revolution, World Wars 1 and 2, Postwar Europe as well as courses on gender and sexuality. She has written The Politics of Women’s Work: The Paris Garment Trades (Princeton UP, 1996), the modern half of W.W. Norton’s Western Civilizations (New York, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2011) and a series of articles from her book. “Historicizing The Second Sex,” French Politics, Culture & Society 25, 3 (Winter 2007); “Beauvoir, Kinsey, and Mid-Century Sex,” French Politics, Culture, and Society 28, 2 (summer, 2010); “Opinion and Desire: Polling Women in Postwar France” in Kerstin Bruckweh, ed. The Voice of the Citizen Consumer (Oxford University Press, 2011); and "Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir," American Historical Review October, 2010. She is also writing about the histories of psychoanalysis and radio (“The Adventure of the Interior: Menie Grégoire’s Radio Broadcasts.”), and has taught graduate classes in the history of radio, publicity, and privacy.

She lived three years in Paris, got her PhD at Yale, taught at Harvard and UC Riverside; she's been a fellow at NYU and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; her husband is Professor and Dean for Research at the UT School of Law; her children are in their twenties, and she is happiest in the winter in Austin and when visiting the Hill Country.

Julia Gossard is Assistant Professor of History at Utah State University and learned quite a bit about gender, psychoanalysis, and feminist studies from Judy as a student at UT-Austin

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 26 2020 · 40mins
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Simone de Beauvoir: Affirming the Ambiguity of Existence

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We are joined by philosopher Shannon Mussett. She is a professor of philosophy at Utah Valley University and a scholar of  Simone De Beauvoir. Beauvoir is a seminal thinker in phenomenological-existential philosophy. She is also a pioneer theorist of Feminism  whose works The Ethics of Ambiguity (1947) and The Second Sex (1949) significantly challenged the status quo of philosophy and patriarchal society.

For more on Simone de Beauvoir https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/beauvoir/

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Aug 12 2020 · 1hr 9mins
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I: Simone de Beauvoir: Her Life (All Three Parts)

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Episode 1. Le Deuxieme Sex (The Second Sex) germinated with Jean-Paul Satre. It was changed by the experience of love Nelson Agren and Simone de Beauvoir lived. What we eventually hold is that - One is not born but rather become a woman.
Episode 2. When Beauvoir met Nelson Agren, she was in love with him, in Chicago. However, it was Paris, her home. Was it Jean-Paul Satre or the idea of Satre or the inhibitions which changes breed in humans which stopped her from leaping from France to the United States? Or, one of the many choices, she took because it felt right to her at that point in time.
Episode 3. Beauvoir lived as per her choices, at times with consequences she didn't like. But for all the freedom she fought for, did she live a free life? And our perception of her is because of incidents or who we are?

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Apr 19 2020 · 37mins
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Simone de Beauvoir à la Brett Paesel

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Who is Brett Paesel:

Brett Paesel is the author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, "Mommies Who Drink: Sex, Drugs, and Other Distant Memories of an Ordinary Mom and the recently released novel, Everything Is Just Fine. Her work has been published in numerous collections and national publications including the New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and Salon.com. In Hollywood, she has been a consulting producer on Amazon's television series, "Transparent" and "I Love Dick". She has developed and written shows for HBO, ABC, Fox, Comedy Central, WB, Lifetime and Nick at Nite. As an actor, she was a cast member of "Transparent" and HBO's, "Mr. Show with Bob and David". She lives in Los Angeles, with her husband and two sons.

Who is Simone de Beauvoir:

Simone de Beauvoir was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist and social theorist. She did not consider herself a philosopher, she had a significant influence on feminist existentialism and feminist theory.

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Nov 26 2019 · 35mins
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#96: Simone de Beauvoir’s philosophy, with Kate Kirkpatrick

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Known as the philosopher who wrote The Second Sex, Simone de Beauvoir’s life has been the subject of much attention and intrigue. But her storied relationship with fellow existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre only scratches the surface of her vibrant and influential mind. King’s College philosopher Kate Kirkpatrick joins the Prospect Podcast to discuss Beauvoir’s philosophy and ethics, and her little-known work on the politics of ageing. 


Kate Kirkpatrick’s Becoming Beauvoir is available with Bloomsbury: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/becoming-beauvoir-9781350047174/

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Aug 30 2019 · 23mins
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Simone de Beauvoir with Jeremy Sabol

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April 16, 2019-- A conversation with professor Jeremy Sabol on the topic of the French existentialist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir.
Apr 16 2019 · 1hr 8mins
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GREAT BOOKS 7: Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex, with Catharine Stimpson

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"Woman is not born but made." This is only one of the powerful sentences in Simone de Beauvoir’s magisterial The Second Sex (1949). It means that there’s nothing natural about the fact that 50% of humanity has been oppressed by the other half for millennia. There’s nothing natural about the secondary status of women as either inferior or as helpers, assistants, supporters, care-givers, or objects of reverence, fascination, desire, etc. I spoke with Kate Stimpson, one of the academics who was instrumental in establishing the field of women and gender studies in America. She talks about the impact of Simone de Beauvoir’s masterful book: what it has done for what is today called gender studies, and what de Beauvoir does for thinking about the whole of the human condition. This is one of my all-time favorite books, and one that everyone should read. It’s also over 900 pages, so this conversation might be a good introduction.

Feb 04 2019 · 50mins
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EP 74: Simone de Beauvoir

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Ben explains Simone de Beauvoir to Pat.
Jan 19 2019 · 1hr 7mins
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