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Neil Shubin Podcasts

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19 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Neil Shubin. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Neil Shubin, often where they are interviewed.

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19 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Neil Shubin. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Neil Shubin, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Professor Neil Shubin joins Dr. Drew this week to discuss his new book 'Some Assembly Required: Decoding Four Billion Years of Life, from Ancient Fossils to DNA' as well as his very notable previous book 'Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion Year History of the Human Body’. Learn more about Neil at neilshubin.com

May 27 2020

55mins

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Neil Shubin: How do big changes in evolution happen?

Science Focus Podcast
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The first time a fish crawled out of the water and onto land, it was a turning point that led to brand new kinds of life. But this couldn’t happen on its own: that fish would have needed both lungs and legs.

Neil Shubin, evolutionary biologist and author of Some Assembly Required (£18.99, Oneworld), says that fish didn’t evolve these traits to help them live on land. In fact, the reason they could live on land was that they repurposed the body parts they had already.

The same remarkable changes have happened all through evolutionary history, from the first vertebrate life to the first flying dinosaurs.

He speaks to our Online assistant Sara Rigby.

Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.

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May 04 2020

35mins

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Evolutionary Biologist Neil Shubin, Bee Virus Behavior, Search for Lost Apples. May 1, 2020, Part 2

Science Friday
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The Twists And Turns Of The Evolution Of Life On Earth

In an evolutionary tree, neat branches link the paths of different species back through time. As you follow the forking paths, you can trace common ancestors, winding down the trunk to see the root organism in common. 

Evolution in the real world is a little messier—full of dead ends and changes happening beneath the surface, even before new traits and species appear. And the research and science that gave us a better picture about how life evolved on Earth can just be just as complicated.  

Evolutionary biologist Neil Shubin, author of Some Assembly Required: Decoding Four Billion Years of Life, from Ancient Fossils to DNA, explains how technology like DNA sequences has allowed scientists to fill in these gaps in the story of evolution

A Viral Battle In The Honey Bee Hive

New research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates that honey bees infected with a virus may alter their behavior in ways that slow the spread of the infection. At the same time, infection with the virus may help the bees sneak into neighboring hives, potentially spreading the virus to new hosts.

Adam Dolezal, an assistant professor of entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and one of the authors of the study, describes the research, and the evolutionary arms race that may be taking place between the bees and the virus.

The Malus Domestica Detectives

Earlier this month, the Lost Apple Project in Washington state announced a fruitful bounty: Ten varieties of apples found in the Pacific Northwest that had been considered “lost” varieties. These include the Sary Sinap, originally from Turkey, and the Streaked Pippin from New York.

To find these varieties, the researchers used an old school identification process—the partner organization, Temperate Orchard Conservancy, compared the mystery apples to watercolor paintings commissioned by the USDA from the 1800s and early 1900s. It’s a time consuming process, and positive identification can take years.

Joining Ira to talk apple identification are Shaun Shepherd, pomologist at the Temperate Orchard Conservancy in Portland, Oregon, and Gayle Volk, plant physiologist at the USDA in Fort Collins, Colorado.

May 01 2020

45mins

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Neil Shubin (4/1/2020) Inside the Writer's Studio Episode #57

Inside the Writer's Studio
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Charlie talks with science writer Neil Shubin about the history of genetic science as revealed in Neil's new book Some Assembly Required. From Darwin to DNA with lots of fascinating stories in between Neil helps us not understand not only where we came from as a species but the stories of the men and women who discovered, and continue to discover, the secrets of our evolutionary journey.

Apr 01 2020

40mins

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109. Neil Shubin — Some Assembly Required: Decoding Four Billion Years of Life, from Ancient Fossils to DNA

Science Salon
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The author of the best-selling Your Inner Fish gives us a lively and accessible account of the great transformations in the history of life on Earth — a new view of the evolution of human and animal life that explains how the incredible diversity of life on our planet came to be. Over billions of years, ancient fish evolved to walk on land, reptiles transformed into birds that fly, and apelike primates evolved into humans that walk on two legs, talk, and write. For more than a century, paleontologists have traveled the globe to find fossils that show how such changes have happened. We have now arrived at a remarkable moment — prehistoric fossils coupled with new DNA technology have given us the tools to answer some of the basic questions of our existence: How do big changes in evolution happen? Is our presence on Earth the product of mere chance? This new science reveals a multibillion-year evolutionary history filled with twists and turns, trial and error, accident and invention. In Some Assembly Required, Neil Shubin takes readers on a journey of discovery spanning centuries, as explorers and scientists seek to understand the origins of life’s immense diversity. Shermer and Shubin also discuss:

  • Darwin’s consilience of inductions (convergence of evidence) from multiple lines of inquiry
  • how a scientific theory can gain acceptance without an underlying causal mechanism (evolutionary theory before DNA)
  • what scientists should do with anomalies unexplained by the prevailing theory
  • Does ontogeny recapitulate phylogeny? (What can we learn about evolution from embryology?)
  • What is epigenetics, anyway?
  • the best explanation for the origins of life
  • how information can increase in a genome
  • from microevolution to macroevolution: why creationists are wrong
  • Are there hopeful monsters in evolution?
  • Punctuated equilibrium and what it was like to be Steve Gould’s TA
  • women in science, then and now
  • What it’s like to do a paleontological dig north of the arctic circle? and
  • Martian paleontology.

Neil Shubin is the author of Some Assembly Required, Your Inner Fish, and The Universe Within. He is the Robert R. Bensley Professor of Organismal Biology and Anatomy at the University of Chicago. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2011. He lives in Chicago.

Listen to Science Salon via Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, and TuneIn.

Mar 24 2020

1hr 30mins

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TB vaccination to replace culling in badgers; Neil Shubin on the wonders of evolution

BBC Inside Science
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The government have announced that the controversial cull of badgers across England will begin to be phased out in the next few years. It will be replaced by vaccinating badgers for bovine TB. The cull is intended to cut tuberculosis in cattle and has killed at least 100,000 badgers since 2013. TB in cattle is a severe problem for farmers and taxpayers, leading to the compulsory slaughter of 30,000 cattle and a cost of £150m every year.
However culling is thought to have failed because frequent trading of cattle and poor biosecurity on farms severely hampering efforts to tackle the crisis. Expert and ecologist Rosie Woodroffe at the Institute of Zoology, the research division of the Zoological Society of London, who has been trialling vaccinations for the past few years in Cornwall explains to Marnie Chesterton why it is highly desirable to move from culling to vaccination of badgers. Plus they discuss the parallels between this and the coronavirus outbreak in humans.

Evolutionary biologist Neil Shubin at the University of Chicago, is also the author of the best-selling book on evolution – ‘Your Inner Fish’. In his new book, out this week, ‘Some Assembly Required – Decoding four billion years of life from ancient fossils to DNA’, Neil revisits the topic of evolutionary development and explains to Adam how we have now arrived at a remarkable moment—prehistoric fossils coupled with new DNA technology have given us the tools to answer some of the basic questions of our existence: How do big changes in evolution happen? Is our presence on Earth the product of mere chance? This new science reveals a multi-billion-year evolutionary history filled with twists and turns, trial and error, accident and invention.

Presenter - Marnie Chesterton
Producer – Fiona Roberts

Mar 19 2020

28mins

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88 | Neil Shubin on Evolution, Genes, and Dramatic Transitions

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
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“What good is half a wing?” That’s the rhetorical question often asked by people who have trouble accepting Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection. Of course it’s a very answerable question, but figuring out what exactly the answer is leads us to some fascinating biology. Neil Shubin should know: he is the co-discoverer of Tiktaalik Roseae, an ancient species of fish that was in the process of learning to walk and breathe on land. We talk about how these major transitions happen — typically when evolution finds a way to re-purpose existing organs into new roles — and how we can learn about them by studying living creatures and the information contained in their genomes.

Support Mindscape on Patreon.

Neil Shubin received his Ph.D. in organismic and evolutionary biology from Harvard University. He is currently the the Robert Bensley Distinguished Service Professor and Associate Dean of Biological Sciences at the University of Chicago. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical society. His first book, Your Inner Fish, was chosen by the National Academy of Sciences as the best science book of 2009, and was subsequently made into a TV special. His new book is Some Assembly Required: Decoding Four Billion Years of Life, from Ancient Fossils to DNA.

Mar 16 2020

1hr 33mins

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The Missing Link In Evolution with Neil Shubin

Big Brains
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We're taking a summer break during July, but we'll be back in August with new episodes telling the stories of leading research with some of the world's greatest minds. During the break, we'll be bringing you updated versions of prior episodes.

Evolutionary biologist Neil Shubin spent six years in the Arctic searching for a fossil that could be a missing link between sea and land animals. Shubin shares the story behind his discovery of Tiktaalik, what it has meant for the understanding of human evolution, and how it has impacted the future of genetic research.

Jul 15 2019

26mins

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Neil Shubin: The Evolution of Limbs from Fins (with English subtitles)

iBiology: Subtitled versions
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Neil Shubin is interested in understanding how human limbs evolved from fish fins. To answer this question, Shubin searched for a fossil intermediate between fish and tetrapods. Far in the Canadian arctic, he and his colleagues found Tiktaalik roseae, a 375 million year old fossil of a flat-headed fish with fin bones corresponding to limb and wrist bones. Shubin and his lab then switched gears and used developmental genetics to investigate the evolution of limb development. Specifically, they looked at Hox genes, known to be important in mammalian limb development. Comparing Gar fish and mouse, they found similar patterns of Hox gene expression in fish fins and mouse forelimbs. This combination of fossil and genetic evidence suggests that the distal regions of fish fins evolved into wrist bones in mammals.

http://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/neil-shubin-part-1.html

Speaker Biography:
Dr. Neil Shubin is a Professor in the Department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy and the Committee on Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago. Shubin’s research focuses on understanding the evolutionary origins of new anatomical features such as limbs. Shubin is well known for his discovery of Tiktaalik roseae,the 375 million year old fossil link between fish and tetrapods. Shubin is the author of two popular science books including Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion Year History of the Human Body, named best book of 2008 by the National Academies of Science. Shubin is an elected member of the National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Jan 06 2017

26mins

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Episode 107 - Neil Shubin Part 2

Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria
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Cara is thrilled to have the opportunity to continue her conversation with paleontologist, geneticist, anatomist, and popular science author Dr. Neil Shubin (Your Inner Fish, The Universe Within). They discuss Tiktaalik's place in our evolutionary past, along with new technologies and techniques that continue to unify Darwin's prescient theory and provide new clues to the great tree of life here on Earth. Also included: answers to brilliant questions asked by previous Talk Nerdy guest, young Stella Krone. Follow Neil: @NeilShubin.

May 02 2016

1hr 3mins

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