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Richard Nixon

56 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Jul 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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BONUS: Richard Nixon's Address to the Nation Announcing His Resignation | August 8, 1974

This American President

On August 8, 1974, President Nixon addressed the country to announce his resignation as President of the United States. In his address he concludes that it is evident he no longer has a strong enough political base in Congress to justify continuing his efforts to carry out his term. He acknowledges that the interests of the nation should come before personal considerations. He concedes that America needs a full-time President and full-time Congress and that it would be a distraction for him to continue as President. He ends by advocating for future peace among nations abroad and prosperity, justice, and opportunity for all at home.This is a part of a series of bonus episodes featuring full length presidential speeches.FollowWebsite: thisamericanpresident.comTwitter: twitter.com/ThisAmerPresFacebook: facebook.com/ThisAmerPresInstagram: www.instagram.com/thisamericanpresidentSupportPatreon: patreon.com/thisamericanpresidentPaypal: paypal.me/thisamerpresCreditsProduced by Richard Lim and Michael NealAssisted by Kolyo Vanchev and Melina SpatharisArt by Nip Rogers: NipRogers.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

24mins

8 Jul 2021

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Richard Nixon - Pioneer of Polarization | Ken Hughes

You Don't Have to Yell

Ken Hughes of the University of Virginia discusses how Richard Nixon used the Vietnam War to polarize the American electorate, secure reelection, and turn America from a center left country to a center right one. In this conversation, we learn how much of US politics is about governing by misdirection, and the repercussions it can have for years to come. 

1hr 12mins

24 Jun 2021

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The last 100 days of King Richard Nixon

Late Night Live - Full program podcast

Almost 50 years after the resignation of President Richard Nixon, there is still much to learn from recently released tapes, of the lies, burglary and backstabbing surrounding Watergate. With Michael Dobbs, former Washington Post journalist, and author of King Richard.

53mins

3 Jun 2021

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The last 100 days of King Richard Nixon

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Almost fifty years after the event, there is still much to reveal about the downfall of US President Richard Nixon. After a landslide re-election in 1972, it took just 100 days for his presidency to unravel amidst lies, burglary, backstabbing, counter-claims and senate committee hearings. So was Nixon a classical tragic figure or not?

53mins

3 Jun 2021

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BONUS: Richard Nixon's "Silent Majority" Speech on the Vietnam War | November 3, 1969

This American President

On November 3, 1969, Richard Nixon delivered this address to the nation on the war in Vietnam. In this speech he assures the American people that he is taking all necessary measures to push towards peace and end the Vietnam War. He does not advocate withdrawing troops, but instead negotiating peace. President Nixon remains sympathetic to the American call for peace but pushes forward with steadfast intention to end the war and ensure stability in South Vietnam, seeking the support of the great silent majority.This is a part of a series of bonus episodes featuring full length presidential speeches.FollowWebsite: thisamericanpresident.comTwitter: twitter.com/ThisAmerPresFacebook: facebook.com/ThisAmerPresSupportPatreon: patreon.com/thisamericanpresidentPaypal: paypal.me/thisamerpresCreditsProduced by Richard Lim and Michael NealArt by Nip Rogers: NipRogers.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

37mins

12 May 2021

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#004 Is sending a photo of Richard Nixon classed as a Dick Pick?

Ok Smart Ass

Patrick comes to the conclusion he will never own a jetpack whilst Tor suggests he should place an order for a flying car instead. We find out that more people than you think are sexting and sending nude pics and we offer advice on the best way to hide a tattoo - an analogue and a digital solution. Visit oksmartass.com to leep up to date on nerd stuff.

45mins

4 May 2021

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BONUS: Richard Nixon's First Inaugural Address | January 20, 1969

This American President

On January 20, 1969, Richard Nixon delivered his first inaugural address—the culmination of one of the greatest comebacks in American political history. After losing the 1960 election to John F. Kennedy and then the 1962 California gubernatorial election, Nixon's political career was all but over. Although history remembers him as a controversial president, in this speech, he sought to unite a country in turmoil, ravaged by racial and generational divisions.This is the first in a series of bonus episodes featuring full length speeches featured in our regular episodes.FollowWebsite: thisamericanpresident.comTwitter: twitter.com/ThisAmerPresFacebook: facebook.com/ThisAmerPresSupportPatreon: patreon.com/thisamericanpresidentPaypal: paypal.me/thisamerpresCreditsProduced by Richard Lim and Michael NealArt by Nip Rogers: NipRogers.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

25mins

21 Apr 2021

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Richard Nixon

We Didn't Start the Fire: The History Podcast

"A mystery wrapped in an enigma." Episode nine is the first of three that will follow Nixon's rise from his poor Quaker roots in rural California, to the White House and Watergate. The fantastic Dr Rivers Gambrell brings alive Nixon's early career for Tom and Katie: his dream of being a sports star never far from his mind, the path that led Nixon to his 1968 win is one of rejection, awkwardness and fervent political cunning.See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

41mins

22 Mar 2021

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Episode 21: Richard Nixon

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Today’s episode is all about Richard Milhouse Nixon, the 37th President of the United States.  But the real question is…which Nixon?? Among the most mercurial of our presidents, some might say Machiavellian while others would reach for malevolent, Richard Nixon was a man who changed over the course of the more than quarter century he spent at the beating heart of American politics. Or, did he? He came of political age fighting communists, and left the White House with legal fights that would dog him the rest of his days. In one of our first episodes, Eric Foner told us that every president, and perhaps more importantly every historian, needs to ‘get right with Lincoln,’ in order to understand his era and our own. I’d argue that if you want to understand the America of 2021, you don’t have to get right with Nixon, but you do have to get your mind around him.We first talked to Professor Kevin Kruse of Princeton University. We the spoke to Martha Jones, Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. Finally, we spoke to journalist Clare Malone, a voice you’ll probably recognize if you’ve followed American politics in the age of Trump, who also knows a thing or two about where Trump came from, and it’s a story with Nixon written all over it. Together our conversations brought out two themes: First, that Nixon’s positions on race always reflect the political realities of the moment and what was most likely to help him get ahead.Second, how Nixon helped reshape political parties, including catalyzing a new generation of African-American women political leaders.To learn more, visit pastpromisepresidency.com.

1hr 9mins

25 Feb 2021

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158 — A Plea for Peace: Leonard Bernstein, Richard Nixon, and the Music of the 1973 Inauguration

The Kitchen Sisters Present

Music and poetry were powerful headliners at the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris signaling change and new beginnings. This was not the first time the arts have reflected the mood of the country and a new administration. In January 1973, following the Christmas bombing of Vietnam, conductor Leonard Bernstein gathered an impromptu orchestra to perform an "anti-inaugural concert" protesting Richard Nixon's official inaugural concert and his escalation of the war in Vietnam. One of the main performances of the official inaugural was the 1812 Overture with its booming drums replicating the sound of war cannons. In 1973, the United States was reaching the concluding stages of our involvement in Vietnam.  And while the war would soon come to an end, the weeks leading up to the second inauguration of Richard Nixon were met with some of the most intense and deadly bombing campaigns of the war. The anti-war movement was unhinged. They had marched, they protested — to seemingly no avail when it came to changing Nixon’s foreign policies. So what to do next... Leonard Bernstein gathered an impromptu orchestra for an “anti-inaugural concert”— a concert for peace—following his belief that by creating beauty, and by sharing it with as many people as possible, artists had the power to tip the earthly balance in favor of brotherhood and peace. This story was produced by Brandi Howell with special thanks to Michael Chikinda, Alicia Kopfstein, Matt Holsen, and Bernie Swain. Find more of her stories at: theechochamberpodcast.com

35mins

26 Jan 2021

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