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David Remnick

38 Podcast Episodes

Latest 8 Dec 2022 | Updated Daily

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Episode 54: The New Yorker's David Remnick

Food People by Bon Appétit

The editor of The New Yorker talks bagels, lunch with Obama, and his love of the office candy stash. Later, we catch up with senior editor Julia Kramer on the road as she scours the country for America's best new restaurants. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

38mins

9 Nov 2022

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The New Yorker's David Remnick Speaks His Truth

She Makes Money Moves | Glamour

If you want to really understand what’s happening in the U.S. (and the world) at large, there’s really one person to ask - editor of The New Yorker, David Remnick. His calm presence and firm knowledge of all things politics is simply unparalleled. Pam will speak with David in a rare conversation prior to the midterm elections in the U.S. to understand the pivotal issues at hand and where he thinks the U.S. is headed today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

55mins

19 Oct 2022

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The New Yorker's David Remnick Speaks His Truth

Tell Me What You Really Think with Pam Drucker Mann

If you want to really understand what’s happening in the U.S. (and the world) at large, there’s really one person to ask - editor of The New Yorker, David Remnick. His calm presence and firm knowledge of all things politics is simply unparalleled. Pam will speak with David in a rare conversation prior to the midterm elections in the U.S. to understand the pivotal issues at hand and where he thinks the U.S. is headed today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

54mins

19 Oct 2022

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The Chet Code, Book Club Finale with David Remnick

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

Bomani Jones shares his thoughts on his trip to Las Vegas to watch the NBA Summer League, getting a look at Chet Holmgren, the scene in Vegas, dangly earrings making a comeback for men and the WNBA All-Star Game’s tiny MVP trophy. Plus, author of #TheRightTimeBookClub selection “King of the World” David Remnick joins to discuss why he decided to write a book about Muhammad Ali, not making a plaster saint of Ali, feeling bad for Floyd Patterson, Frank Sinatra taking pictures to get into a fight and writing a definitive text. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

57mins

11 Jul 2022

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Masha Gessen and David Remnick on Putin

The Vault

Institute fellow, and New Yorker staff writer, Masha Gessen is one of the foremost critics of Vladimir Putin. In 2014, Gessen spoke at the Institute with New Yorker editor David Remnick about Gessen's book, Words Will Break Cement, about Pussy Riot. Much of the conversation focused on Putin's ambitions for an imperial Russia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

34mins

24 Mar 2022

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David Remnick: Putin would ‘love to see us fail’

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

Tensions between Russia and the West remain high but what happens next is something of a mystery — in part because Vladimir Putin’s playbook is designed to be unpredictable.David Remnick, the editor of the New Yorker, author and former Moscow correspondent, talks to Chuck about what might be motivating the Russian president.

28mins

4 Feb 2022

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"David Remnick"

SmartLess

Why is David Remnick always so cold? He’s surrounded by drafts. Editor of The New Yorker and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer David Remnick joins us this week to discuss penne pasta, drunk tweeting, feeding the recycling bin, and Leonard Cohen. Theres some other good stuff in their two also, its’See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

45mins

11 Oct 2021

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Jonathan Franzen Talks with David Remnick About “Crossroads”

The Political Scene | The New Yorker

Jonathan Franzen’s sixth novel, “Crossroads,” is set in 1971, and the title is firmly on the nose: the Hildebrand family is at a crossroads itself, just as the America of that moment seemed poised to come apart. In the course of his career, Franzen has evolved away from an early postmodernist sensibility that highlighted “bravura” writing, and “with this book I threw away all the po-mo hijinks and the grand plot elements,” he tells David Remnick. “It’s really only in the course of writing ‘Crossroads’ that I have said to myself, What I am is a novelist of character and psychology. . . . It’s not about formal experimentation and it’s certainly not about changing the world through my social commentary.” Franzen also discusses the complex ethics behind writing a character of another race, and takes issue with the belief of some in the academy (and much of the political right) that leftist sensibilities are stifling free expression; he declined to sign the “Harper’s Letter” last year. Despite political polarization, Franzen says, “It’s a much better time to be an American writer than I would have guessed twenty-five years ago.”

26mins

4 Oct 2021

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Jonathan Franzen Talks with David Remnick About “Crossroads”

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Jonathan Franzen’s sixth novel, “Crossroads,” is set in 1971, and the title is firmly on the nose: the Hildebrand family is at a crossroads itself, just as the America of that moment seemed poised to come apart. In the course of his career, Franzen has evolved away from an early postmodernist sensibility that highlighted “bravura” writing, and “with this book I threw away all the po-mo hijinks and the grand plot elements,” he tells David Remnick. “It’s really only in the course of writing ‘Crossroads’ that I have said to myself, What I am is a novelist of character and psychology. . . . It’s not about formal experimentation and it’s certainly not about changing the world through my social commentary.” Franzen also discusses the complex ethics behind writing a character of another race, and takes issue with the belief of some in the academy (and much of the political right) that leftist sensibilities are stifling free expression; he declined to sign the “Harper’s Letter” last year. Despite political polarization, Franzen says, “It’s a much better time to be an American writer than I would have guessed twenty-five years ago.”

27mins

1 Oct 2021

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Eric Adams Talks with David Remnick

The Political Scene | The New Yorker

The New York City mayoral primary, which culminated in a vote held in June, was full of surprises, including the introduction of ranked-choice voting to a confused electorate, and the presence of Andrew Yang, a newcomer to municipal politics who quickly attained front-runner status. But the winning Democrat was no surprise. Eric Adams is the borough president of Brooklyn and a former state senator, making him an establishment favorite. He was also, for more than two decades, a police officer. With policing at the center of public attention since last year’s uprising of the Black Lives Matter movement, Adams occupies a unique position in the debate. He was a firebrand in the N.Y.P.D. and an advocate for Black officers; and he was, as a teen-age boy, a victim of police abuse himself. But Adams is also a strong defender of the police department. He has spoken about the correct way to implement stop-and-frisk policies, which have been previously carried out in ways that were ruled unconstitutional. He rebuked candidates to his left who talked about defunding the force. And he made the national spike in violent crime part of his candidacy, when others focussed their platforms elsewhere.   The nation’s cities face a budgetary crisis, the COVID crisis, a crisis of confidence in policing, and more. Adams doesn’t seem fazed. “We need to be very honest that our city is dysfunctional. And it always has been for a large number of New Yorkers,” he told David Remnick. “I could take you throughout the city where the conditions have remained the same through mayor after mayor. What I must do is stop the dysfunctionality of a city that has normalized being dysfunctional.” Remnick spoke with Adams on July 21, 2021.

23mins

25 Jul 2021

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