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Richard Wrangham Podcasts

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25 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Richard Wrangham. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Richard Wrangham, often where they are interviewed.

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25 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Richard Wrangham. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Richard Wrangham, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Anthropology, Men vs Women, Patriarchy, Brain Size, Fire, Culture, Humans | Richard Wrangham - #13

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Richard Walter Wrangham (born 1948) is an English anthropologist and primatologist. His research and writing have involved ape behavior, human evolution, violence, and cooking.

In this episode we discuss: 

  • Biological Anthropology 
  • Humans 
  • Importance of fire Use of fire at increasing our brain size 
  • How our biology depends on culture Difference between roles of men and women in Hunter-Gatherer societies 
  • Relationships in Hunter-Gatherer societies 
  • Why all human societies have been patriarchal and possibility of matriarchal societies 
  • Warfare  

Buy Richard's Books: 

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B003F5NSVK/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

The Goodness Paradox: How Evolution Made Us Both More and Less Violent 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07FDPZNMY/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

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Sep 17 2020 · 1hr 4mins
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My Chat with Primatologist Dr. Richard Wrangham (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_73)

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Topics covered include primate behavior, Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, the Harvard sociobiology wars, evolutionary psychology, male violence, cooking as a cultural adaptation, Darwinian gastronomy, veganism, nomological networks of cumulative evidence, and the evolution of goodness.

Note: Apologies for the audiovisual segments that were somewhat patchy early in our chat. I did not edit out anything.

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This clip was posted earlier today (September 4, 2020) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1124: https://youtu.be/q3OiAddep-s

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Please visit my new website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar.

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Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. His fourth book The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense will be released on October 6, 2020. Pre-order your copy now.

https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X

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Sep 04 2020 · 1hr 10mins
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288 | Grounds for Peace | Evolution and Human Violence | Richard Wrangham

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In partnership with the 2020 European Peace Colloquy, Project Zion Podcast is bringing you interviews with the presenters. Today, we welcome Richard Wrangham to expand on his presentation, "Evolution and Human Violence".

Richard Wrangham, a distinguished British primatologist explains that humans are both gentle and calculatingly violent. Hence the title of his recent book The Goodness Paradox. You could never fly 300 chimps peacefully in a plane, but humans will, even politely. At the same time humans can coldly conspire murder, war, genocide, or the use of nuclear weapons.

Buy Richard's Book
View Richard's Peace Colloquy Presentation
Register for the Peace Colloquy 

Jul 21 2020 · 55mins
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Richard Wrangham - Chimps and Violence

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Richard Wrangham is a primatologist, a recipient of a MacArthur "Genius" Grant, and the author of "Demonic Males" and "The Goodness Paradox."

Jun 20 2020 · 53mins
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Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human with Richard Wrangham

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Today's guest argues that it was cooking that caused the extraordinary transformation of our ancestors from apelike beings to Homo erectus.

At the heart of this episode lies an explosive new idea: the habit of eating cooked rather than raw food permitted the digestive tract to shrink and the human brain to grow, helped structure human society, and created the male-female division of labour. As our ancestors adapted to using fire, humans emerged as "the cooking apes”.

Covering everything from food-labelling to sexual division of labour to raw-food faddists, Catching Fire offers a startlingly original argument about how we came to be the social, intelligent, and sexual species we are today.

A fundamental question that every culture answers in a different way, but only science can truly decide and one today’s guest deeply explore is What made us human?

Our guest’s work proposes a new answer. He is a true changemaker, driven by curiosity and believes the transformative moment that gave rise to the genus Homo, one of the great transitions in the history of life, stemmed from the control of fire and the advent of cooked meals.

Fire was our first technology. Cooking increased the value of our food. It changed our bodies, our brains, our use of time, and our social lives. It made us into consumers of external energy and thereby created an organism with a new relationship to nature, dependent on fuel.
Dec 26 2019 · 49mins
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233: Richard Wrangham | Domestication, Aggression, And Human Evolution In “The Goodness Paradox”

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Humans have evolved to become more domesticated, and there are multiple variables at work causing this shift. It wasn’t always this way, and human species have had a two-sided relationship with virtue and violence a long period of time. Dr. Richard Wrangham, author of The Goodness Paradox, joins on episode 233 to discuss this shift and relationship.

Professor Wrangham (PhD, Cambridge University, 1975) is Ruth B. Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University and founded the Kibale Chimpanzee Project in 1987. He has conducted extensive research on primate ecology, nutrition, and social behavior. He is best known for his work on the evolution of human warfare, described in the book Demonic Males, and on the role of cooking in human evolution, described in the book Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human. Together with Elizabeth Ross, he co-founded the Kasiisi Project in 1997, and serves as a patron of the Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP).

It was neat to talk with Professor Wrangham about the ways that evolution has impacted humans as they have progressed. We also included some material on his understanding of cooking and its impacts.

Show notes:

  • how proactive and reactive aggression differ, and why that is important
  • some of the ways that Professor Wrangham has done research on chimpanzees to understand more about humans
  • where humans stand on the threshold of reactive and proactive aggression
  • the elements that separated Homo sapiens from the other species of humans
  • how intra and inter group cooperation without expectation of future returns works in principle but struggles in person
  • the impact of capital punishment as a way to reduce societal reactive aggression via conformity
  • the window of socialization that exists early in life
  • how the leaders of alpha males of a group impact the rest of the group, and what happens when they die off or are vanquished

Glad to have Dr. Wrangham on the show~ You can check out The Goodness Paradox on Amazon, look at his faculty page, or check out his chimpanzee project website.

The post 233: Richard Wrangham | Domestication, Aggression, And Human Evolution In “The Goodness Paradox” appeared first on The Armen Show.

Oct 14 2019 · 46mins
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How Cooking Made Us Human with Professor Richard Wrangham

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Humans are the only animals that cook their food. One of the implications of cooking food, as noted by Oliver Goldsmith is, “of all other animals we spend the least time in eating”. In a ground-breaking theory of our origins, primatologist Richard Wrangham argues that the shift from raw to cooked food was a key factor in human development. When our ancestors adapted to using fire, humanity as we know it, began. Wrangham notes that as a result of eating cooked food, the human digestive tract shrank and the brain grew. Eating cooked plants or meat makes digestion easier and the energy we formerly spent on digestion was freed up, enabling our brains to grow. Cooking increases the proportion of nutrients that can be digested, makes food easier to digest and kills pathogens (harmful bacteria and viruses). Time once spent chewing tough food could be used instead to hunt and undertake other tasks and activities. Cooking became the basis for pair bonding and marriage, created household and shaped family structures, and even led to a gender based division of labour.
Richard Wrangham is a professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University and founded the Kibale Chimpanzee Project in 1987. He has conducted extensive research on primate ecology, nutrition, and social behaviour. In his book “Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human” Wrangham argues that cooking food is obligatory for humans as a result of biological adaptations and the cooking, in particular, the consumption of cooked food might explain the increase in human brain size, smaller teeth and jaws, and smaller more effective digestive system. Wrangham’s “Catching Fire” presents an interesting narrative that how we came to be the social and intelligent beings that we are today.
“Cooking was a great discovery not merely because it gave us better food, or even because it made us physically human. It did something even more important: it helped make our brains uniquely large, providing a dull human body with a brilliant human mind” – Richard Wrangham
Jul 20 2019 · 43mins
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NEW - RICHARD WRANGHAM - The Goodness Paradox - Humans show extremes of violence and harmony.

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How is that humans can be both the nicest and the nastiest of species? Biological anthropologist RICHARD WRANGHAM wrestles with that question in The Goodness Paradox: The Strange Relationship Between Virtue and Violence in Human Evolution. Though our capacity for coolly planned and devastating violence remains unrivaled, Wrangham offers a strikingly original theory that capital punishment has been instrumental in humans becoming extremely peaceful in our daily interactions. Can this understanding help us to confront the growing hostility in society?
May 04 2019 · 1hr
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61. Dr. Richard Wrangham — The Goodness Paradox: The Strange Relationship Between Virtue and Violence in Human Evolution

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We Homo sapiens can be the nicest of species and also the nastiest. What occurred during human evolution to account for this paradox? What are the two kinds of aggression that primates are prone to, and why did each evolve separately? How does the intensity of violence among humans compare with the aggressive behavior of other primates? How did humans domesticate themselves? And how were the acquisition of language and the practice of capital punishment determining factors in the rise of culture and civilization?

Authoritative, provocative, and engaging, The Goodness Paradox offers a startlingly original theory of how, in the last 250 million years, humankind became an increasingly peaceful species in daily interactions even as its capacity for coolly planned and devastating violence remains undiminished. In tracing the evolutionary histories of reactive and proactive aggression, biological anthropologist Richard Wrangham forcefully and persuasively argues for the necessity of social tolerance and the control of savage divisiveness still haunting us today.

Dr. Richard Wrangham is Ruth B. Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology, Harvard University. He is the author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made us Human and Demonic Males: Apes and the Origins of Human Violence. He has studied wild chimpanzees in Uganda since 1987 and received a MacArthur Foundation fellowship and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences of the British Academy.

Dr. Wrangham and Dr. Shermer discuss:

  • the paradox of Homo sapiens
  • the two types of aggression: proactive and reactive
  • the evolutionary origins of aggression and the logic behind it
  • the neural pathways of aggression
  • how species can be both artificially and self-domesticated
  • the tyrant/bully problem and how our ancestors solved it
  • war and human nature.

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This Science Salon was recorded on March 5, 2019.

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Apr 10 2019 · 1hr 41mins
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#151 Richard Wrangham: The Goodness Paradox, Human Self-Domestication and Aggression

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Dr. Richard Wrangham is Ruth B. Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University and founded the Kibale Chimpanzee Project in 1987. He has conducted extensive research on primate ecology, nutrition, and social behavior. He is best known for his work on the evolution of human warfare, described in the book Demonic Males, and on the role of cooking in human evolution, described in the book Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human. Together with Elizabeth Ross, he co-founded the Kasiisi Project in 1997, and serves as a patron of the Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP). He has also recently published the book The Goodness Paradox: The Strange Relationship Between Virtue and Violence in Human Evolution (2019).

In this episode, we focus on the main topics of Dr. Wrangham’s latest book, The Goodness Paradox. We talk about the differences between reactive aggression and proactive aggression, comparing ourselves to other primates, and also evidence that comes from studies with hunter-gatherers, horticulturalists and other traditional human societies. Then, we discuss self-domestication, starting with the changes that usually occur both at the physical and the behavioral levels in domesticated species, and also some aspects of our sociality that might have favored self-domestication in our species, with focus on the role that capital punishment has played. Finally, we talk about group selection at the genetic and cultural levels, and also speculate a bit on the possibility of some gene-culture coevolution processes that were set in place after the advent of agriculture having contributed for the further reduction of reactive aggression in humans. 

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Follow Dr. Wrangham’s work:

Faculty page: https://bit.ly/2TpMSZP

Articles of Researchgate: https://bit.ly/2NKQC1K

Books: https://amzn.to/2NSWdDr

The Goodness Paradox: https://amzn.to/2ER2JHH

Kibale Chimpazee Project: https://bit.ly/2H42OKq

Referenced books:

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human: https://amzn.to/2TjSODn

Demonic Males: Apes and the Origins of Human Violence: https://amzn.to/2ERDGEu

The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined: https://amzn.to/2aY25WF

Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress: https://amzn.to/2FRJrj5

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Mar 15 2019 · 56mins
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