OwlTail

Cover image of Jamie Barton

Jamie Barton

13 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2022 | Updated Daily

Episode artwork

S2 Ep17: Come As You Are: Jamie Barton

The Atlanta Opera Podcast

Come As You Are explores the intersection of the careers of arts professionals and their identities across the LGBTQIA+ spectrum. In each episode, costume designer, trans man, and host Erik Teague discusses the complex narratives, unique challenges, and beautiful stories of a guest's journey through their discipline and their identity. So grab yourself a cup and join us for a good story! Erik chats with "opera's nose-studded rock star" Jamie Barton for this intriguing and engaging episode, exploring a range of topics from body positivity to gender identity advocacy within the world of opera.

32mins

22 Feb 2022

Episode artwork

Homework Special - Headteacher Jamie Barton on why it's important and how parents can help

Brummie Mummies

How does homework play out in your house? Is it a battle of wits or is your child keen to get pen to paper? Do you think they get too much extra school work or not enough?In this episode we’re talking all things homework with Jamie Barton who is head of school for the Jewellery Quarter Academy.He tells us that doing homework can actually improve a child’s progress by as much as five months - oh, and he said that teachers can tell when parents have done their child’s homework for them!The Brummie Mummies podcast is a Laudable production brought to you by Brummie Mummies and Birmingham Live.

39mins

1 Feb 2022

Similar People

Episode artwork

JAMIE BARTON

The CVH Podcast

That's what she said. Jams first Carmen StalkersDisappearing forever.The one and only Jambo

2hr 39mins

16 Sep 2021

Episode artwork

Episode 8 - Ste Weatherhead, Tammy Reynolds, Saeed Olayiwola and Jamie Barton

Discovering Community Psychology

In this episode we’re joined by a group of friends who have connected across the Liverpool region, speaking about the many projects they have been involved with and coming together to create change. Dr Ste Weatherhead (@SteWeatherhead) is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist working with the Liverpool Clinical Psychology programme and NeuroTriage CIC (@Neurotriage), who provide outreach support to the people in Liverpool affected by homelessness. Tammy Reynolds (@migettebardot), a disabled person, artist and activist, introduces their art and practice, which they create to interrogate themselves and their audience through their various works. Saeed Olayiwola (@SaeedOlayiwola) Holistic Wellbeing Practitioner and founder of SO Health (@S_O_Health) uses his passion of physical health to support people, communities and workplaces in their physical and emotional wellbeing. Jamie Barton, Researcher with Housing First, a homelessness and housing service in Liverpool, is passionate about the use of storytelling and narratives that can help people make sense of themselves and their lives. Jamie, Tammy, Saeed and Ste shared the stories that brought them to community working, creating events that were about bringing people together. We got to hear about some of the projects they’ve been involved with, including establishing the Psychology Fringe Festival in 2017, an arts-based festival open to all, exploring topics around mental health and wellbeing. This was an opportunity to bring people together and make space for conversations about individual and community wellbeing. Homelessness No Laughing Matter, at Leaf a café bar in Liverpool (@LEAFonBoldSt https://www.thisisleaf.co.uk), was another event that saw the group come together, where people used the platform to tell their stories. The group reflected on this event, Jamie telling his own story, Tammy’s experiences of comparing, and what it took to create a community feeling: working with people you trust, transparency, honesty, thinking about safety for people and the responsibility for after-care. We heard about the importance of thinking about where we meet people, being gentle and a caution not to colonise community spaces. We heard about the need to take care of ourselves and each other in doing this work through compassion, listening to and learning from younger people and what can get in the way of wellbeing in an economy-driven world. Jamie describes Rat Park and how this links to addiction research (link - https://www.brucekalexander.com/articles-speeches/rat-park/282-rat-park-versus-the-new-york-times-2 YouTube video -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLx4efEXGYg) and his learning of where connection to land, culture, community and spirituality is dislocated, we see addiction rise (https://www.brucekalexander.com/articles-speeches/283-addiction,-environmental-crisis,-and-global-capitalism), as well suicide rates being lower in first nation communities where elders still told stories and spoke of the histories of their communities (https://reviewboard.ca/upload/project_document/Chandler_and_Lalonde_1998_Paper__1265041839.PDF)

1hr 3mins

27 Apr 2021

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Jamie Barton

Notes From Musicians’ Kitchens

Join Jennifer Johnston, as she talks to the celebrated American mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton about lockdown from her home in Atlanta, Georgia. You’ll hear her talk about coping with a travelling minstrel’s life, cooking from scratch, body positivity, finding balance and her Nanna’s biscuits.  Notes From Musicians Kitchens is a cookbook written by musicians as a means of digitally breaking bread with each other, of sharing and appreciating our diverse food cultures, and of creating new memories, all of which will raise money for Help Musicians U.K. Join me, Jennifer Johnston, as I talk to the American mezzo-soprano, Jamie Barton, about body positivity, finding balance and her Nanna’s biscuits. www.notesfrommusicianskitchens.com

52mins

27 Apr 2020

Episode artwork

Working: Behind the Scenes at the Opera With Jamie Barton

Slate Daily Feed

This week, June Thomas talks with opera singer Jamie Barton. Barton is a critically acclaimed American mezzosoprano who performs at major opera houses all around the world and maintains an active social media presence that serves as a hub for conversations about body positivity, diet culture, social justice issues, and LGBTQ rights, You can hear her on Studio 360 and watch her on YouTube.They talk about what it really means to travel as an opera singer. Barton explains the challenges of being responsible for providing your own tools for the work you do, and how she’s collaborating online with other artists during the current pandemic.Afterward, June and Isaac Butler discuss what they found most surprising about the interview and answer their very first listener question, about working with an editor. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com.Podcast production by Morgan Flannery. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

52mins

26 Apr 2020

Episode artwork

Working: Behind the Scenes at the Opera With Jamie Barton

Slate Culture

This week, June Thomas talks with opera singer Jamie Barton. Barton is a critically acclaimed American mezzosoprano who performs at major opera houses all around the world and maintains an active social media presence that serves as a hub for conversations about body positivity, diet culture, social justice issues, and LGBTQ rights, You can hear her on Studio 360 and watch her on YouTube.They talk about what it really means to travel as an opera singer. Barton explains the challenges of being responsible for providing your own tools for the work you do, and how she’s collaborating online with other artists during the current pandemic.Afterward, June and Isaac Butler discuss what they found most surprising about the interview and answer their very first listener question, about working with an editor. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com.Podcast production by Morgan Flannery. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

52mins

26 Apr 2020

Episode artwork

Behind the Scenes at the Opera With Jamie Barton

Working

This week, June Thomas talks with opera singer Jamie Barton. Barton is a critically acclaimed American mezzosoprano who performs at major opera houses all around the world and maintains an active social media presence that serves as a hub for conversations about body positivity, diet culture, social justice issues, and LGBTQ rights, You can hear her on Studio 360 and watch her on YouTube.They talk about what it really means to travel as an opera singer. Barton explains the challenges of being responsible for providing your own tools for the work you do, and how she’s collaborating online with other artists during the current pandemic.Afterward, June and Isaac Butler discuss what they found most surprising about the interview and answer their very first listener question, about working with an editor. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com.Podcast production by Morgan Flannery. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

52mins

26 Apr 2020

Episode artwork

Tig Notaro’s case for Nickelback, Ranky Tanky live, and Jamie Barton’s bisexual spin on classical music

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Ranky Tanky performs live in our studio, and explains to Kurt Andersen how their music is rooted in the regional Gullah culture — descendants of West African slaves who lived on isolated islands along the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas. For our Guilty Pleasures series, comic Tig Notaro says why she loves the widely loathed band Nickelback, especially their song “Photograph.” And mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton, a rising star of the opera world, performs love songs directed at women that were meant to be sung by men, and tells Slate’s June Thomas how a sense of bisexual pride drives such performances. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

50mins

9 Jan 2020

Episode artwork

Studio 360: Tig Notaro’s case for Nickelback, Ranky Tanky live, and Jamie Barton’s bisexual spin on classical music

Slate Daily Feed

Ranky Tanky performs live in our studio, and explains to Kurt Andersen how their music is rooted in the regional Gullah culture — descendants of West African slaves who lived on isolated islands along the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas. For our Guilty Pleasures series, comic Tig Notaro says why she loves the widely loathed band Nickelback, especially their song “Photograph.” And mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton, a rising star of the opera world, performs love songs directed at women that were meant to be sung by men, and tells Slate’s June Thomas how a sense of bisexual pride drives such performances. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

53mins

9 Jan 2020

Loading