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Kim Bellware

7 Podcast Episodes

Latest 25 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Kim Bellware: Washington Post correspondent on Derek Chauvin verdict, US Justice investigation

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

The Justice Department is opening a sweeping investigation into policing practices in Minneapolis after a former officer was convicted in the killing of George Floyd there, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced.The decision comes a day after the former officer, Derek Chauvin, was found guilty of murder and manslaughter in Floyd's death last May, a verdict that set off a wave of relief  across the country. Floyd's death had led to months of mass protests against policing and the treatment of Black people in the United States.The Justice Department was already investigating whether Chauvin and the other officers involved in Floyd's death violated his civil rights."Yesterday's verdict in the state criminal trial does not address potentially systemic policing issues in Minneapolis," Garland said.The new investigation is known as a "pattern or practice" — examining whether there is a pattern or practice of unconstitutional or unlawful policing — and will be a more sweeping review of the entire police department. It may result in major changes to policing in the Minnesota city.It will examine the use of force by police officers, including force used during protests, and whether the department engages in discriminatory practices. It will also look into the department's handling of misconduct allegations and its treatment of people with behavioral health issues and will assess the department's current systems of accountability, Garland said.The Minneapolis police said in a statement that the chief, Medaria Arradondo "welcomes this investigation" and will fully cooperate with federal prosecutors. Arradondo "understand that the intent of this inquiry is to reveal any deficiencies or unwanted conduct within the department and provide adequate resources and direction to correct them," the statement said.A senior Justice Department official said prosecutors chose to announce the investigation a day after the verdict because they did not want to do anything to interfere with Chauvin's trial. The official would not discuss details of the investigation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.Three other ex-Minneapolis police officers charged in Floyd's death will be tried together beginning Aug. 23. The official said their trial is far enough off that officials believed it was still appropriate to make the announcement Wednesday, even though the defendants are awaiting trial on state charges.It's unclear whether the years under investigation will begin when Floyd died or before. Garland said a public report would be issued if the department finds a pattern or practice of unconstitutional policing. The government also could bring a lawsuit against the police department, which in the past have typically ended in settlement agreements or consent decrees to force changes.The Minneapolis Police Department is also being investigated by the Minnesota Department of Human Rights, which is looking into the police department's policies and practices over the past decade to see if it engaged in systemic discriminatory practices.Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said city officials "welcome the investigation as an opportunity to continue working toward deep change and accountability in the Minneapolis Police Department." The city council also issued a statement supporting the investigation, saying its work had been constrained by local laws and that it welcomes "new tools to pursue transformational, structural changes to how the City provides for public safety."The Justice Department official said attorneys from the department's civil rights division are in Minneapolis, working with the U.S. attorney's office and speaking with community groups and others.Floyd, 46, was arrested on suspicion of passing a counterfeit $20 bill for a pack of cigarettes at a corner market. He panicked, pleaded that he was claustrophobic and struggled with police when they tried to put him in a squad car. They put him on the ground instead.The centerp...

3mins

22 Apr 2021

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April 20th, 2021: Former Baltimore City Councilman Carl Stokes, National Reporter For WaPo Kim Bellware, and Professor Dr. Bruce Sacerdote

C4 and Bryan Nehman

C4 and Bryan Nehman heard weekdays from 5:30-10:00am ET on WBAL Newsradio 1090, FM101.5, and the WBAL Radio App.

2hr 1min

20 Apr 2021

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CPC ldr Erin O'Toole. Climate / Trudeau budget & vaccines, Dr. Isaac Bogoch. Member ON vaccine taskforce. David Redman. Fmr exec dir Alberta Emergency Management Agency challenges premiers on COVID. Washington Post reporter Kim Bellware. Chauvin trial ends.

Roy Green Show

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

33mins

18 Apr 2021

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Saskatchewan premier Scott Moe. Provinces and Trudeau gov on vaccines & fed budget, CMA president Dr. Ann Collins. Non-pandemic surgeries stalled: Covid, WaPo nat reporter Kim Bellware on Derek Chauvin murder trial, Royal Columbian hospital (BC) Dr. Gerald Da Roza. 30yr olds in ICU battling Covid.

Roy Green Show

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

30mins

11 Apr 2021

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WaPo nat reporter Kim Bellware on Derek Chauvin murder trial

Roy Green Show

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

6mins

11 Apr 2021

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Kim Bellware: Washington Post reporter on George Floyd's murder trial beginning

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

The video of George Floyd gasping for breath was essentially Exhibit A as the former Minneapolis police officer who pressed his knee on the Black man’s neck went on trial Monday on charges of murder and manslaughter.Prosecutor Jerry Blackwell showed the jurors the footage at the earliest opportunity, during opening statements, after telling them that the number to remember was 9 minutes, 29 seconds — the amount of time officer Derek Chauvin had Floyd pinned to the pavement last May.The white officer “didn’t let up" even after a handcuffed Floyd said 27 times that he couldn’t breathe and went limp, Blackwell said in the case that triggered worldwide protests, scattered violence and national soul-searching over racial justice.“He put his knees upon his neck and his back, grinding and crushing him, until the very breath -- no, ladies and gentlemen -- until the very life was squeezed out of him,” the prosecutor said.Chauvin attorney Eric Nelson countered by arguing: “Derek Chauvin did exactly what he had been trained to do over his 19-year career.”Floyd was fighting efforts to put him in a squad car as the crowd of onlookers around Chauvin and his fellow officers grew and became increasingly hostile, Nelson said.The defense attorney also disputed that Chauvin was to blame for Floyd’s death.Floyd, 46, had none of the telltale signs of asphyxiation and had fentanyl and methamphetamine in his system, Nelson said. He said Floyd’s drug use, combined with his heart disease, high blood pressure and the adrenaline flowing through his body, caused a heart rhythm disturbance that killed him.“There is no political or social cause in this courtroom,” Nelson said. “But the evidence is far greater than 9 minutes and 29 seconds.”Blackwell, however, rejected the argument that Floyd’s drug use or any underlying health conditions were to blame, saying it was the officer's knee that killed him.Chauvin, 45, is charged with unintentional second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter. The most serious charge, the second-degree murder count, carries up to 40 years in prison. This is the first trial ever televised in Minnesota.Bystander Donald Williams, who said he was trained in mixed martial arts, including chokeholds, testified that Chauvin appeared to increase the pressure on Floyd's neck several times with a shimmying motion. He said he yelled to the officer that he was cutting off Floyd's blood supply.Williams recalled that Floyd’s voice grew thicker as his breathing became more labored, and he eventually stopped moving. He said he saw Floyd’s eyes roll back in his head, likening the sight to fish he had caught earlier that day.Williams said he saw Floyd “slowly fade away ... like the fish in the bag.”Earlier, Minneapolis police dispatcher Jena Scurry testified that she saw part of Floyd's arrest unfolding via a city surveillance camera and was so disturbed that she called a duty sergeant. Scurry said she grew concerned because the officers hadn’t moved after several minutes.“You can call me a snitch if you want to,” Scurry said in her call to the sergeant, which was played in court. She said she wouldn't normally call the sergeant about the use of force because it was beyond the scope of her duties, but “my instincts were telling me that something is wrong.”The video played during opening statements was posted to Facebook by a bystander who witnessed Floyd being arrested after he was accused of trying to pass a counterfeit $20 bill at a convenience store. The footage caused revulsion across the U.S. and beyond and prompted calls for the country to confront racism and police brutality.Jurors watched intently as the video played on multiple screens, with one drawing a sharp breath as Floyd said he couldn’t breathe. Chauvin sat calmly during opening statements and took notes, looking up at the video periodically.“My stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Everything hurts,” Floyd says in the video, and: “I can’t breathe,...

4mins

29 Mar 2021

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July 2, 2020: Covid-19 update w/Kim Bellware

The Chip Franklin Show

Chip talks to Washington Post National Breaking News reporter Kim Bellware about the latest Covid-19 news, including a nationwide spike in new cases and Texas requiring face masks throughout the state. 

20mins

2 Jul 2020