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Byron Reeves

4 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

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E122 | Byron Reeves: What our screens tell us about us

Stanford Radio

The Future of Everything with Russ AltmanByron Reeves: What our screens tell us about usA professor of communication recorded long stretches of screen time in the lives of his test subjects and turned to artificial intelligence to paint a remarkable portrait of modern life.With the emergence of touchscreen smartphones, tablets and watches, so much of our lives is spent on our devices that in many ways we are what appears on screen. This “mediatization,” as Byron Reeves, a professor of communication at Stanford University, puts it, sparked a remarkable and unprecedented study of the way we live today.In a series of field studies, Reeves has recorded screen time of his subjects one frame every five seconds for days on end — with promises of absolute privacy, of course. He then uses artificial intelligence to decipher it all — words and images are recorded and analyzed. The portraits that emerge play out like cinema, revealing never-before-imagined insights into how people live in the screen-time world.Reeves says the pervading sense that everyone is multitasking and that attention spans are narrowing is not just a hunch, but demonstrable in the data. Our screens are often filled with radically different content side-by-side and each bit gets consumed in rapid-fire bursts of focus, often no more than 10 to 20 seconds each. Join us for a fascinating look at our screen-time culture on the latest episode of Stanford Engineering’s The Future of Everything podcast. Listen here.

27mins

15 Aug 2020

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Byron Reeves: What our screens tell us about us

The Future of Everything presented by Stanford Engineering

With the emergence of touchscreen smartphones, tablets and watches, so much of our lives is spent on our devices that in many ways we are what appears on screen. This “mediatization,” as Byron Reeves, a professor of communication at Stanford University, puts it, sparked a remarkable and unprecedented study of the way we live today.In a series of field studies, Reeves has recorded screen time of his subjects one frame every five seconds for days on end — with promises of absolute privacy, of course. He then uses artificial intelligence to decipher it all — words and images are recorded and analyzed. The portraits that emerge play out like cinema, revealing never-before-imagined insights into how people live in the screen-time world. Reeves says the pervading sense that everyone is multitasking and that attention spans are narrowing is not just a hunch, but demonstrable in the data. Our screens are often filled with radically different content side-by-side and each bit gets consumed in rapid-fire bursts of focus, often no more than 10 to 20 seconds each.  Join us for a fascinating look at our screen-time culture on the latest episode of Stanford Engineering’s The Future of Everything podcast. Listen here.

27mins

15 Aug 2020

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Ep. 11: Byron Reeves on the True Power of Media

Applied Wisdom

Byron Reeves, the Paul C. Edwards Professor of Communication in the Department of Communication at Stanford University and co-author of The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television, and New Media Like Real People and Places, is on the cutting edge as media is a vital component of many if not all sectors. With electrodes connected to our scalps, the data for the book collected showed that we respond to media subconciously. Through his research, Byron has come to the conclusion that the mediated life is difficult to separate from real life. In a world where our shared culture comes from the connection we have to others, those who control what we see and hear through media hold great power. What are their ethics? Do they know the difference between good and evil?Perhaps we should look in the mirror. Byron’s recent research shows that each of us is in charge of our own screenome, the moment-by-moment changes in our use of digital media. Each of us decides what bits of content we will happen to take away each day from our screen time. Thus, each of us holds the power to define good and evil, composing our own myth from the shards we happen to consume. Something to think about.The post Ep. 11: Byron Reeves on the True Power of Media appeared first on Applied Wisdom Institute at the University of Redlands.

38mins

31 May 2019

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The Hidden Benefits of Online Distraction with Byron Reeves

School's In

Byron Reeves, the Paul C. Edwards Professor of Communication at Stanford, talks about the benefits and drawbacks of task switching and whether gamification is a helpful skill-building tool.

28mins

3 Mar 2017

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