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Christopher Cameron

15 Podcast Episodes

Latest 26 Nov 2022 | Updated Daily

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Episode 48: Black Freethinkers, with Dr. Christopher Cameron

Beyond Atheism Podcast

In this episode, we’re joined by Dr. Christopher Cameron, a professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the author of Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism. We talk about Chris’s own winding path to atheism before getting into the history. What do we know about the religion of enslaved people? Were there any atheists among them? How did religion change after the end of slavery? Did atheism play a role in the Civil Rights Movement? We also find out whether a “true atheist” can miss things about being a believer. In the bonus section, available exclusively for Patreon supporters, we ask about Chris’s thoughts on the current state of the secular movement, and whether he has come across any really shitty atheists in his research.For more on Chris: https://pages.charlotte.edu/christopher-cameron/ Check out his book, Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism: https://www.amazon.com/Black-Freethinkers-American-Secularism-Insurgencies/dp/0810140780/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=black+freethinkers&qid=1568467548&sr=8-1 Check out his contribution in OnlySky: https://onlysky.media/salasady/what-do-you-miss-and-not-miss-about-religion/ The three books Chris recommended by Black freethinkers:Sikivu Hutchinson, Moral Combat: Black Atheists, Gender Politics, and the Values Wars: https://www.amazon.ca/Moral-Combat-Atheists-Gender-Politics/dp/057807186X Anthony Pinn,The End of God-Talk: An African American Humanist Theology: https://www.amazon.ca/End-God-Talk-American-Humanist-Theology/dp/0195340833 James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time: https://www.amazon.ca/Fire-Next-Time-James-Baldwin/dp/067974472X Follow Nathan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NathGAlexander Nathan’s website: https://www.nathangalexander.com/ If you find the podcast valuable and want to support it, check out our Patreon page, where you will also find bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/beyond_atheism We are grateful for every contribution.Beyond Atheism is produced and distributed by Atheists United Studios: https://www.atheistsunited.org/podcasts

1hr 13mins

14 Sep 2022

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”Not my Ancestors?” - Prof. Christopher Cameron

Where We’re Headed

To be or not to be...our ancestors. Over the last few years of Civil Rights protests here within the United States has been common to hear the phrase “I am not my ancestors”. And increasingly, entertainers speaking for African-Americans echo these sentiments in the public sphere. Kanye West, Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube have all gone on-record to openly disclaim, mock and rebuke long-held or respected connections to our forbearers in movement history. What is behind this? Is it fair or accurate to our collective memory or are their comments better explained by cultural bias, shame, anti-blackness and/or poor historical education? Beyond them, how do inaccurate retellings of history similarly play into our perceptions of self, community and resistance?   In this episode we feature Author and Professor Christopher Cameron for a second discussion, helping us to reshape our view of ancestry and more accurately detail our own history in Black Freethought-related Civil Rights work and the Creative Arts. Cameron is a professor of Professor of History and Interim Chair of Africana Studies at Univ. Of NC Charlotte and Author, Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism.   _____________________________ (Ep. 7)  Show Notes Host: Rogiérs Writing & Narration: Rogiérs  Production & Editing: Fibby Music Group, LLC Opening performed by Rogiérs, Reginald & Alesandra Ndu Recorded at: FMG Studios, Washington, DC Cover Artwork: Emily Wilson Music Licensing/Episode Musical Credits courtesy of: Fibby Music Recordings, Storyblocks Resources & Mentions "Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism", Christopher Cameron, Northwestern University Press  "I Am Not My Ancestors", Z From Baltimore (Spoken Word)  “West African Ancestral Cults Shows the Belief in Life After Death”, Chinelo Eze, Life  "Common, Pharrell, and ‘The New Black’: An Ignorant Mentality That Undermines the Black Experience”, Stereo Williams, The Daily Beast  “Kanye West makes chaotic presidential rally debut in South Carolina”, The Guardian  “Kanye West says 'slavery was a choice'”, CBC News  "Snoop Dogg Asks Fans to Boycott ‘Roots’: 'Let’s Create Our Own Shit Based on Today'", Ryan Parker, The Hollywood Reporter  _____________________________ For Contact, Inquiry, Voicemail & Feedback:  E: BNDCPodcast@gmail.com Twitter: @WWHPodcasting _____________________________ Additional Content: Find the entire LEGACY catalogue of programs online at the Black Nonbelievers YouTube Channel! Find Black Nonbelievers of DC online on Facebook and also on Meetup.  Support  Black Nonbelievers follow on Twitter and find a local affiliate new you! Special thanks to the American Humanist Association and the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities for their support. (c) 2022 Fibby Music Group, LLC www.FibbyMusic.net 

1hr 3mins

18 Mar 2022

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Christopher Cameron, NY Post Real Estate and Travel Editor

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7mins

11 Aug 2021

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Christopher Cameron, NY Post Real Estate and Travel Editor

Michigan's Big Show

7mins

11 Aug 2021

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Episode #36 - Christopher Cameron, Real Estate and Travel Editor, New York Post

Hospitality Forward

In this episode, Hanna Lee and Michael Anstendig of Hanna Lee Communications chat with Christopher Cameron, Real Estate and Travel Editor of the New York Post. ⁣⁣Chris is an award-winning journalist with nearly a decade of newsroom experience, writing for publications that include the Wall Street Journal, Architectural Digest, The New York Observer and The Real Deal. ⁣⁣⁣Tune in to hear this wise and witty journalist with a nose for news share his thoughts on:⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣1. Why he thinks New York City’s hospitality industry is about to experience a creative boom.⁣⁣⁣2. ⁣What sets the New York Post apart from other newspapers, including its big headlines, strong voice and stories about regular New Yorkers.⁣⁣3. Why the New York Post is expanding its coverage of the city’s restaurants and bars.⁣⁣4. How, beyond celebrities, he profiles those who are ahead of the curve and setting a trend.⁣⁣⁣5. How story ideas that buck expectations and advance the narrative are what catch his eye.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣Connect with Chris by phone at (615) 830-0873 or via ccameron@nypost.com. ⁣⁣⁣⁣For more information on our agency, please visit www.hannaleecommunications.com.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣Connect with hosts Hanna Lee (@hannaleeny), Michael Anstendig (@michaelanstendig) and our agency (@hannaleepr) on IG.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

25mins

26 May 2021

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303 - Christopher Cameron (Black Freethinkers)

American Freethought Podcast

I interview Christopher Cameron, author of Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism. For more about Chris visit his UNCC faculty page. To buy his book click here. Plus: Trump issues a bogus declaration defining places of worship as "essential." This is an unenforceable attempt to paint governors as anti-religion and fool his base into thinking Trump has their backs. In AKA Jane Roe, a new documentary about the late Norma McCorvey (the "Roe" in "Roe vs Wade"), she reveals that her late-life conversion to fundamentalist Christianity and her embrace of the anti-abortion cause was all a lie, and that she was actually secretly paid by anti-abortion operatives to play a part. Theme music courtesy of Body Found. Follow American Freethought on the intertubes: Website: AmericanFreethought.com Twitter: @AMERFREETHOUGHT Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/21523473365/ Libsyn Classic Feed: https://americanfreethought.libsyn.com/rss Contact: john@americanfreethought.com Support the Podcast: PayPal funds to sniderishere@gmail.com

1hr 2mins

31 May 2020

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Christopher Cameron, "Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism" (Northwestern UP, 2019)

New Books in Intellectual History

Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (Northwestern University Press, 2019) by Christopher Cameron, an Associate Professor of history at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, is a precise and nuanced history of African American secularism from the early nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. This text is written with economy and clarity as defined by four concise chapters that detail the major moments in African American history including some discussion of Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights-Black Power era. Traversing nearly two centuries of black thought, from the Antebellum period to the demise of the Black Power era, Black Freethinkers is the first comprehensive historical survey of black free thought. For Cameron, free thought encompasses atheism, agnosticism, deism, paganism and other non-traditional modes of thinking. Cameron’s work focuses primarily on the ideas advanced by African American men and women of letters such as Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Lorraine Hansberry, and James Baldwin to support his core argument that freethought and “unbelief” have been key elements of Black thought since the era of enslavement to the institutionalization of free thought oriented associations in African American society.Cameron’s work forces us to rethink the way we study the era of enslavement and African American culture, and the place of Douglass as an American intellectual central to this history, as well as the role of religion in Black life more generally. In many respects, his text presents a more humanistic portrait of African American thought and culture from a historical perspective that goes well beyond most texts on this subject.Hettie V. Williams Ph.D., has taught survey courses in U.S. history, Western Civilization, and upper division courses on the history of African Americans at the university level for more than fifteen years. Her teaching and research interests include: African American intellectual history, gender in U.S. history, and race/ethnicity studies. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of African American history in the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University where she teaches courses in African American history and U.S. history. She has published book chapters, essays, and encyclopedia entries and edited/authored five books. Her latest publications include Bury My Heart in a Free Land: Black Women Intellectuals in Modern U.S. History (Praeger, 2017) and, with Dr. G. Reginald Daniel, professor of historical sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Race and the Obama Phenomenon: The Vision of a More Perfect Multiracial Union (University Press of Mississippi 2014). You can learn more about her work here or follow her on twitter (@DrHettie2017).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

48mins

13 Jan 2020

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Christopher Cameron, "Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism" (Northwestern UP, 2019)

New Books in Religion

Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (Northwestern University Press, 2019) by Christopher Cameron, an Associate Professor of history at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, is a precise and nuanced history of African American secularism from the early nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. This text is written with economy and clarity as defined by four concise chapters that detail the major moments in African American history including some discussion of Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights-Black Power era. Traversing nearly two centuries of black thought, from the Antebellum period to the demise of the Black Power era, Black Freethinkers is the first comprehensive historical survey of black free thought. For Cameron, free thought encompasses atheism, agnosticism, deism, paganism and other non-traditional modes of thinking. Cameron’s work focuses primarily on the ideas advanced by African American men and women of letters such as Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Lorraine Hansberry, and James Baldwin to support his core argument that freethought and “unbelief” have been key elements of Black thought since the era of enslavement to the institutionalization of free thought oriented associations in African American society.Cameron’s work forces us to rethink the way we study the era of enslavement and African American culture, and the place of Douglass as an American intellectual central to this history, as well as the role of religion in Black life more generally. In many respects, his text presents a more humanistic portrait of African American thought and culture from a historical perspective that goes well beyond most texts on this subject.Hettie V. Williams Ph.D., has taught survey courses in U.S. history, Western Civilization, and upper division courses on the history of African Americans at the university level for more than fifteen years. Her teaching and research interests include: African American intellectual history, gender in U.S. history, and race/ethnicity studies. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of African American history in the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University where she teaches courses in African American history and U.S. history. She has published book chapters, essays, and encyclopedia entries and edited/authored five books. Her latest publications include Bury My Heart in a Free Land: Black Women Intellectuals in Modern U.S. History (Praeger, 2017) and, with Dr. G. Reginald Daniel, professor of historical sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Race and the Obama Phenomenon: The Vision of a More Perfect Multiracial Union (University Press of Mississippi 2014). You can learn more about her work here or follow her on twitter (@DrHettie2017).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

48mins

13 Jan 2020

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Christopher Cameron, "Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism" (Northwestern UP, 2019)

New Books in Secularism

Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (Northwestern University Press, 2019) by Christopher Cameron, an Associate Professor of history at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, is a precise and nuanced history of African American secularism from the early nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. This text is written with economy and clarity as defined by four concise chapters that detail the major moments in African American history including some discussion of Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights-Black Power era. Traversing nearly two centuries of black thought, from the Antebellum period to the demise of the Black Power era, Black Freethinkers is the first comprehensive historical survey of black free thought. For Cameron, free thought encompasses atheism, agnosticism, deism, paganism and other non-traditional modes of thinking. Cameron’s work focuses primarily on the ideas advanced by African American men and women of letters such as Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Lorraine Hansberry, and James Baldwin to support his core argument that freethought and “unbelief” have been key elements of Black thought since the era of enslavement to the institutionalization of free thought oriented associations in African American society.Cameron’s work forces us to rethink the way we study the era of enslavement and African American culture, and the place of Douglass as an American intellectual central to this history, as well as the role of religion in Black life more generally. In many respects, his text presents a more humanistic portrait of African American thought and culture from a historical perspective that goes well beyond most texts on this subject.Hettie V. Williams Ph.D., has taught survey courses in U.S. history, Western Civilization, and upper division courses on the history of African Americans at the university level for more than fifteen years. Her teaching and research interests include: African American intellectual history, gender in U.S. history, and race/ethnicity studies. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of African American history in the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University where she teaches courses in African American history and U.S. history. She has published book chapters, essays, and encyclopedia entries and edited/authored five books. Her latest publications include Bury My Heart in a Free Land: Black Women Intellectuals in Modern U.S. History (Praeger, 2017) and, with Dr. G. Reginald Daniel, professor of historical sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Race and the Obama Phenomenon: The Vision of a More Perfect Multiracial Union (University Press of Mississippi 2014). You can learn more about her work here or follow her on twitter (@DrHettie2017).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/secularism

48mins

13 Jan 2020

Episode artwork

Christopher Cameron, "Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism" (Northwestern UP, 2019)

New Books in African American Studies

Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (Northwestern University Press, 2019) by Christopher Cameron, an Associate Professor of history at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, is a precise and nuanced history of African American secularism from the early nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. This text is written with economy and clarity as defined by four concise chapters that detail the major moments in African American history including some discussion of Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights-Black Power era. Traversing nearly two centuries of black thought, from the Antebellum period to the demise of the Black Power era, Black Freethinkers is the first comprehensive historical survey of black free thought. For Cameron, free thought encompasses atheism, agnosticism, deism, paganism and other non-traditional modes of thinking. Cameron’s work focuses primarily on the ideas advanced by African American men and women of letters such as Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Lorraine Hansberry, and James Baldwin to support his core argument that freethought and “unbelief” have been key elements of Black thought since the era of enslavement to the institutionalization of free thought oriented associations in African American society.Cameron’s work forces us to rethink the way we study the era of enslavement and African American culture, and the place of Douglass as an American intellectual central to this history, as well as the role of religion in Black life more generally. In many respects, his text presents a more humanistic portrait of African American thought and culture from a historical perspective that goes well beyond most texts on this subject.Hettie V. Williams Ph.D., has taught survey courses in U.S. history, Western Civilization, and upper division courses on the history of African Americans at the university level for more than fifteen years. Her teaching and research interests include: African American intellectual history, gender in U.S. history, and race/ethnicity studies. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of African American history in the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University where she teaches courses in African American history and U.S. history. She has published book chapters, essays, and encyclopedia entries and edited/authored five books. Her latest publications include Bury My Heart in a Free Land: Black Women Intellectuals in Modern U.S. History (Praeger, 2017) and, with Dr. G. Reginald Daniel, professor of historical sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Race and the Obama Phenomenon: The Vision of a More Perfect Multiracial Union (University Press of Mississippi 2014). You can learn more about her work here or follow her on twitter (@DrHettie2017).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

48mins

13 Jan 2020

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