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Jon Duffy

12 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Jan 2023 | Updated Daily

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Jon Duffy on Consumer as the original member-funded media organisation

The Fold

Consumer has had a big year – driving the conversation around the grocery duopoly in a way which has fundamentally reframed our view of supermarkets. Yet the challenges facing our consumers are big and complex, and the membership base is shrinking. He joins The Fold to explain why Consumer exists, and how it is evolving in the modern media environment. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

47mins

30 Oct 2022

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Episode 025 - Jon Duffy

Mixtaping Identity

Episode 25 of Mixtaping Identity with comedian, actor, filmmaker and writer Jon Duffy.Shane and Jon chat about Drag Race, Carly Rae Jepson's extensive discography, insulting Björk, and working at Eurovision. Support Jon: https://linktr.ee/jonoduffy Support this show: linktr.ee/MixtapingIdentity Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

1hr 54mins

16 Jun 2022

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Jon Duffy: Consumer New Zealand Chief says Foodstuffs North Island are doing the bare minimum

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

A suggestion changes being agreed to by one of our major supermarket chains don't go far enough.  It comes after a report by the Commerce Commission found competition was lacking in the grocery sector. Foodstuffs North Island, which owns New World, Four Square and Pak'nSave, says it's now willing to support a consumer-focused code of conduct that aims to treat suppliers better. It adds it'll look at simplifying promotions and loyalty schemes. Consumer NZ Chief Executive Jon Duffy says told Kate Hawkesby the company is doing the bare minimum. "This was inevitable, that the code of conduct for suppliers is very much the low-hanging fruit in the analysis that's being done, it was going to happen." LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3mins

14 Sep 2021

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Jon Duffy: Average house price in New Zealand 12x the national income

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Three out of five property owners in New Zealand couldn't afford to buy their own home at its current value.  The average house price in New Zealand is now 12 times the national income.  Consumer New Zealand research found of those without homes, 20 per cent are trying to save for a deposit but can't catch up. Heather du Plessis-Allan spoke to Consumer NZ CEO Jon Duffy. LISTEN ABOVE

3mins

7 Sep 2021

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Jon Duffy: Commerce Commission supermarket competition inquiry - Draft findings released today

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

New Zealand will get the clearest look at the inner workings of the supermarket giants on Thursday when the Commerce Commission releases its draft report into the level of competition across a $22 billion sector.Shortly after the election, Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister David Clark announced the competition watchdog would undertake a market study into supermarkets to determine "whether the sector is as competitive as it could be".The market study is the second of its type under new powers to compel companies to provide detailed financial information, following an examination into petrol companies ordered by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in 2018.For months, the Wellington-based competition watchdog has been receiving evidence and interviewing witnesses, sometimes under oath.The study will be released at 8:30am, followed by a press conference. You can watch it live here.Like many industries in New Zealand, it is a sector dominated by two companies. Foodstuffs, which counts New World, Pak n Save and Four Square among its subsidiaries, and Australian-owned Woolworths, the owner of Countdown.The market study is set to take around 12 months but even the draft report is likely to run to hundreds of pages and make recommendations to improve competition levels.Multiple parties are speculating that among its recommendations would be a binding code of conduct for supermarkets to adhere to, the regulator could urge the government to consider requiring a break-up of some parts of the sector.The study has been a long time coming. In 2014, Shane Jones, then a Labour MP, used Parliamentary privilege to assert that Countdown was treating many of its suppliers poorly.Katherine Rich, the former National MP and long time chief executive of the Food and Grocery Council has been providing materials to the commission including research that suggests most suppliers believe the supermarket groups engage in anti-competitive behaviour.This week, Rich launched a stinging attack targeting Foodstuffs' North Island business, claiming that even on the eve of the draft report, its members were facing the threat of having their products removed from shelves as part of negotiating tactics, demands for a "display fee" which did not promise any actual prominence or contribution to staff wages.Foodstuffs were "either not reading the political environment or dismissing government concerns which led [Clark] to call for the Study," Rich wrote on her LinkedIn page.Foodstuffs did not respond to a request for comment on the claims.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4mins

28 Jul 2021

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Jon Duffy: Consumer NZ on Government's review into supermarket pricing

Simon Barnett & James Daniels Afternoons

Consumer NZ says the government's review into supermarket pricing is vital to ensure Kiwis are getting a fair deal.The Commerce Commission will investigate whether pricing is as competitive as it could be.Consumer NZ CEO Jon Duffy says New Zealand's supermarket 'duopoly' makes it easy for prices to rise.   "Groceries bill make up an essential part of households spend. It’s important to make sure we are being treated fairly."Duffy says a supermarket code of conduct, similar to Australia's, could also be useful in New Zealand. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4mins

17 Nov 2020

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Jon Duffy: Auckland supermarket fined $78,000 for price discrepancies

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

An Auckland supermarket has been fined almost $80,000 for price discrepancies between the promotional price displayed or advertised - and the price charged at the till.Pak'nSave Māngere, operated by Kennedy's Foodcentre 2003 Ltd, has been slapped with a fine of $78,000.It earlier pleaded guilty to six charges of making false and/or misleading representations about price, under the Fair Trading Act, the Commerce Commission said today.Between June and October in 2018 the supermarket was found charging a higher price at the checkout for one or more items than the promotional price it had advertised or displayed on the shelves.Among the overpriced items were mushrooms priced at $4.99 but charged $2 more at the checkout on two occasions, avocados advertised at three for $5 but charged at $1.99 each on one occasion and sliced salmon going for $8.99 on the shelf but $10.79 at the checkout, on four occasions.The charges were laid after officials turned up and carried out "mystery shops" to check advertising prices against those charged at checkout.The price differences were raised by those officials - staff from the Commerce Commission - to customer service staff at the store.However, when staff returned to the supermarket the next day and bought the same items, they found customers were still being charged more at the till than what was being displayed on shelves.In a written decision, Judge McNaughton in the Manukau District Court said the conduct was "repeatedly careless"."The pricing discrepancies related to a number of individual items across different departments of the supermarket and they were repeated," the judge said."And the defendant did not immediately take steps to correct its pricing systems."Once Pak'nSave Māngere was told of the commission's investigation, the supermarket carried out significant steps to fix the issues."But the immediate failure to act was inexcusable," Judge McNaughton said.Commerce Commission chairwoman Anna Rawlings said supermarkets needed to ensure that their systems were sufficiently robust to make sure customers were being charged the right prices and were not misled."Consumers should be able to trust that the price displayed on the shelf is the price they will be charged," she said."If a mistake is made, businesses should ensure consumers are compensated and take immediate steps to ensure that the mistake is not repeated."

4mins

28 Oct 2020

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Jon Duffy: Wilson Parking's anti-competitive behaviour described as deliberate

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Consumer New Zealand says the Commerce Commission should have gone further in its action against Wilson Parking.The parking giant is selling leases to three of its Wellington carpark buildings, after purchasing them in 2016 and increasing prices without sign-off from the commission.It will have to pay the commission half a million dollars for what's been dubbed anti-competitive behaviour.Consumer New Zealand boss Jon Duffy told Mike Hosking there should have been a comparison between what Wilson Parking was charging,  and what it should have been charging.He says some sort of compensation figure should have been worked into the calculation, and half a million dollars seems pretty light.LISTEN ABOVE

2mins

21 Oct 2020

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Jon Duffy: $47m Government package to help travel agents recover $700m

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

Travel agents have been thrown a $47.6 million lifeline by the Government with a scheme to help them recoup nearly $700m spent overseas by Kiwi holidaymakers.Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Kris Faafoi says New Zealanders who have money locked up offshore because of cancelled travel plans as a result of Covid-19 will benefit from the new scheme to support the recovery of refunds and credits from overseas travels suppliers."We know the travel sector and their customers have taken a massive hit due to the disruption caused by Covid-19. The Government's been working with the sector to find a way to help agents assist their customers to get back money that they are owed by travel suppliers," he said.The Government would provide a consumer travel reimbursement scheme to help the return of credits to New Zealand consumers via travel agents.The scheme will be funded to a maximum of $47.6 million.Travel agencies will be paid:• 7.5 per cent of the value of cash refunds and• 5 per cent of the value of credits successfully secured on behalf of consumers.If an agent recoups $10,000 in a refund on cancelled travel, the customer gets that money back and the agent will receive $750. If it's a credit for the $10,000 cancelled travel, the customer gets the credit and the agent receives $500.Since border restrictions were imposed hundreds of agents have lost their jobs and businesss have failed.Kiwis last year spent between $7 billion and $9b on overseas travel, much of which went through agents who took a commission. This halted almost completely in March when global leisure travel ended.The travel sector and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment estimate ab out $690m of New Zealanders' money is locked up because of travel cancelled by Covid-19."We want to get that money back for Kiwi customers and into the local economy as quickly as possible. The scheme we are announcing today will help those in the travel industry with financial support to facilitate the recovery of those funds," Faafoi said."I know that travel agents and wholesalers have been working hard to recover refunds and credits owed to New Zealand consumers, but are under severe financial pressure, with many facing the prospect of insolvency.''Many of the outstanding bookings that remain stalled were complex to put in place and are complicated to unwind.''That's where the expertise of the sector is crucial to help consumers get back money tied up in stranded bookings.'"The travel reimbursement scheme will help increase the likelihood of consumers recovering refunds and credits owed to them. It will also give greater confidence to the travel industry by limiting further insolvencies."Faafoi said that the scheme would be established as soon as practicable, with details such as eligibility to be worked through over the coming weeks.Agents had also been eligible for the wage subsidy scheme.Before the pandemic they employed more than 5000 people throughout New Zealand.Agents put aside traditional rivalries to lobby for Government support and the group doing the negotiating comprised: David Coombes (managing director of Flight Centre NZ), Mark O'Donnell (chief executive of House of Travel), Malcolm MacLeod (chief executive of First Travel Group) and Simon McKearney (executive general manager Helloworld) ."This is good news for our industry. There's still a long road ahead but we're pleased to be getting some much needed support in what has been an incredibly difficult time for travel agencies in New Zealand,'' they said."Our people have been working tirelessly over the past six months to repatriate funds from travel suppliers into the hands of Kiwis. This funding will allow us to recoup some of the costs involved in that lengthy process.While borders remain closed, the industry faced a struggle but the support gives it some breathing room.The group said ti was grateful to Faafoi and acknowledged the work of Kirk Hope (CEO Business NZ) an...

2mins

9 Sep 2020

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Jon Duffy: Consumer NZ says there is a 'moral precedent' for Elton John concert refund

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Elton John fans whose show was cut short in February could have the possibility of getting some of their money back.On February 16, Sir Elton John was forced to call off his first Auckland concert midway through the performance after suffering pneumonia and losing his voice.Michael Batty, who attended the concert, asked the organisers for a partial refund but says he was ignored right until he took the matter to the Disputes Tribunal.Last week, Batty receive a 40 per cent refund last week after settlement in the Disputes Tribunal.Consumer NZ chief executive Jon Duffy told Heather Du Plessis-Allan it's only fair this is also done for everyone else at the concert."We think that there is at least a moral precedent here and that customers who were affected by this partial concert should get at least a partial refund."He says that people could go down to their local district court and file a claim - though it will cost $55. Duffy says it would be better if the promoters refunded customers themselves. ZB Drive tried to get in touch with John's promoter Michael Chugg, but he told a producer he did not know anything about it and hung up.LISTEN ABOVE

2mins

4 Aug 2020

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