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Asao B. Inoue

6 Podcast Episodes

Latest 4 Apr 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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E53: Third Anniversary Celebration (w/ John Oddo, James J. Brown Jr., Derek Handley, Asao B. Inoue, Kendall Phillips, Cameron Mozafari, and Ana Cooke)

re:verb

On this episode, the re:verb editorial team -- Alex Helberg, Calvin Pollak, Sophie Wodzak, and Ben Williams -- kicks back, relaxes, and reflects on three years of podcasting about politics, culture, and language in action. Last Friday, to celebrate re:verb’s three-year anniversary, we held our first-ever livestream via Zoom / YouTube, complete with special guests, new segments, and a hilarious sound-board controlled by Alex. Note: since this was our first time streaming, we had some occasional technical flubs and sound issues, so please bear with us. Along with us on the stream were some of our favorite past guests and collaborators, who joined us to talk about current conversations in politics and culture as well as more recent research they have worked on since we last spoke. In addition, each guest got into the batter’s box and faced off against Calvin’s Curveball, a trivia question related to their research. We talked to Dr. John Oddo about the foreign policy discourses of Biden vs. Trump; Dr. James J. Brown, Jr. about Clubhouse, Zoom, and other currently-popular digital platforms; Dr. Derek Handley, a re:verb co-founder, about his work on mid-20th-century African-American rhetorics of resistance in Minnesota and Wisconsin, and about the pre-history of re:verb; Dr. Asao B. Inoue about developments in anti-racist writing pedagogy over the last year; Dr. Kendall Phillips about his new project analyzing rhetorics of refusal in contemporary films from Joker to Snowpiercer and the Marvel Cinematic Universe; Dr. Cameron Mozafari about right-wing rhetoric and “cancel culture”; and Dr. Ana Cooke, another of re:verb’s co-founders, about her new project on knowledge-making communities online, as well as the past, present, and future of re:verb. We hope you enjoy this anniversary celebration replay! Stay tuned to our Twitter (@reverb_cast) for future livestream announcements, and join us in raising a glass to toast to three great years of podcasting!

2hr 11mins

12 Mar 2021

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[From the Archives] Ep 88: Dr. Asao B. Inoue on Writing Assessment as Anti-racist Practice

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, Katie is joined by Asao B. Inoue, Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Director of University Writing and the Writing Center at the University of Washington Tacoma, a member of the Executive Board of Council of Writing Program Administrators, and the Program Chair of the 2018 Conference on College Composition and Communication. Among his many articles and chapters on writing assessment and race and racism, his article, “Theorizing Failure in U.S. Writing Assessments” in RTE, won the 2014 CWPA Outstanding Scholarship Award. His co-edited collection, Race and Writing Assessment (2012), won the 2014 NCTE/CCCC Outstanding Book Award for an edited collection. His book, Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing for a Socially Just Future (2015) won the 2017 NCTE/CCCC Outstanding Book Award for a monograph and the 2015 CWPA Outstanding Book Award. In November of 2016, he guested co-edited a special issue of College English on writing assessment as social justice, and is currently finishing a co-edited collection on the same topic, as well as a book on labor-based grading contracts as socially just writing assessment. Segment 1: Alternative Modes of Writing Assessment [00:00-14:17] In this first segment, Asao shares about his research and experience with grade-less writing and grading contracts. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Inoue, A. B. (2014). Theorizing failure in U.S. writing assessments. Research in the Teaching of English, 48(3), 330-352. Inoue, A. B., & Poe, M. (Eds.). (2012). Race and writing assessment. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc. Inoue, A. B. (2015). Antiracist writing assessment ecologies: Teaching and assessing for a socially just future. Anderson, SC: Parlor Press. College English Kohn, A. (1993). Punished by rewards: The trouble with gold stars, incentive plans, A’s, praise, and other bribes. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Selected works of Peter Elbow Segment 2: Writing Assessment as Anti-racist Practice [14:18-32:31] In segment two, Asao discusses his research on writing assessment as anti-racist practice. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.

32mins

28 Sep 2020

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E41: ALL of our languages are elegant! (w/ Dr. Asao B. Inoue)

re:verb

On June 19, Rutgers University's English Department announced a slew of actions it would be taking in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, including incorporating critical grammar into its pedagogy. As department chair Rebecca L. Walkowitz explained, this new approach seeks to foster "a critical awareness of the variety of choices available to [students] w/ regard to micro-level [grammatical] issues." In response, the conservative Twittersphere swiftly attempted to CANCEL Rutgers English, with everyone from Andrew Sullivan to Thomas Chatterton Williams anointing themselves writing pedagogy experts and declaring Rutgers’ approach substandard. But what exactly *is* critical grammar, and why might writing teachers want to deploy it? Further, what specific aspects of these conservative arguments makes them so misinformed, out-of-touch, and morally indefensible?To help answer these questions, Alex and Calvin are honored to be joined by Asao B. Inoue, professor and associate dean for Academic Affairs, Equity, and Inclusion in the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts at Arizona State University. Drawing heavily upon Professor Inoue’s knowledge of critical language instruction, we address two conservative media responses to Rutgers English's announcement. The first piece we discuss, from Jeff Jacoby at The Patriot Post (yes, this is a real website), argues that writing instruction should be less concerned with social justice and more like Winston Churchill’s grade school grammar classes. The second piece, from Fox News' The Ingraham Angle, directly samples an interview with Professor Inoue from last year, both fixating on his use of the term “languaging” and missing his point entirely, which he clarifies and contextualizes for us.After closely reading these texts, we conclude by noting an irony that may be familiar to listeners of past re:joinder episodes: these arguments fail even on their own terms, lacking logical rigor, empirical evidence, and rhetorical elegance. By contrast, we attempt to back up our arguments with credible research, anti-racist principles, and lived experiences of teaching and studying writing more recently than the 1990s.Relevant works by Asao B. Inoue:Inoue, A. B., & Poe, M. (2012). Race and Writing Assessment. Studies in Composition and Rhetoric. Volume 7. Peter Lang.Inoue, A. B. (2015). Antiracist writing assessment ecologies: Teaching and assessing writing for a socially just future. WAC Clearinghouse.Inoue, A. B. (2019). Labor-based grading contracts: Building equity and inclusion in the compassionate writing classroom. WAC Clearinghouse.Inoue, A. B. (2019). How do we language so people stop killing each other, or what do we do about white language supremacy? College Composition and Communication, 71(2), 352-369.Works referenced in this episode:CCCC Demands for Black Linguistic JusticePedagogue Podcast featuring Dr. Asao B. InoueBaker-Bell, A. (2020). Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy. Routledge.Bowles, S., & Gintis, H. (1976). Schooling in capitalist America: Educational reform and the contradictions of economic life. Basic Books.Faigley, L. (1979). The influence of generative rhetoric on the syntactic maturity and writing effectiveness of college freshmen. Research in the Teaching of English, 13(3), 197-206.Jencks, C., & Phillips, M. (Eds.). (1998). The Black–White test score gap. Brookings Institution Press.Smitherman, G., & Smitherman-Donaldson, G. (1986). Talkin and testifyin: The language of Black America. Wayne State University Press.Sublette, J. R. (1973). The Dartmouth conference: Its reports and results. College English, 35(3), 348-357.Zancanella, D., Franzak, J., & Sheahan, A. (2016). Dartmouth revisited: Three English educators from different generations reflect on the Dartmouth Conference. English Education, 49(1), 13-27.

1hr 24mins

17 Aug 2020

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Episode 12: Asao B. Inoue

Pedagogue

In this episode, Asao B. Inoue talks about classroom writing assessment, whether labor is a more equitable measure than traditional classroom assessment standards, and students’ perception on labor-based grading contracts.

23mins

6 Dec 2019

Most Popular

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Ep 88: Dr. Asao B. Inoue on Writing Assessment as Anti-racist Practice - Bonus Clip # 1 - The Relationship Between Language and Race

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-05:03]: The Relationship Between Language and Race To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.

5mins

4 Dec 2017

Episode artwork

Ep 88: Dr. Asao B. Inoue on Writing Assessment as Anti-racist Practice

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, Katie is joined by Asao B. Inoue, Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Director of University Writing and the Writing Center at the University of Washington Tacoma, a member of the Executive Board of Council of Writing Program Administrators, and the Program Chair of the 2018 Conference on College Composition and Communication. Among his many articles and chapters on writing assessment and race and racism, his article, "Theorizing Failure in U.S. Writing Assessments" in RTE, won the 2014 CWPA Outstanding Scholarship Award. His co-edited collection, Race and Writing Assessment (2012), won the 2014 NCTE/CCCC Outstanding Book Award for an edited collection. His book, Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing for a Socially Just Future (2015) won the 2017 NCTE/CCCC Outstanding Book Award for a monograph and the 2015 CWPA Outstanding Book Award. In November of 2016, he guested co-edited a special issue of College English on writing assessment as social justice, and is currently finishing a co-edited collection on the same topic, as well as a book on labor-based grading contracts as socially just writing assessment. Segment 1: Alternative Modes of Writing Assessment [00:00-14:17] In this first segment, Asao shares about his research and experience with grade-less writing and grading contracts. Segment 2: Writing Assessment as Anti-racist Practice [14:18-32:31] In segment two, Asao discusses his research on writing assessment as anti-racist practice. Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-05:03]: The Relationship Between Language and Race To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.

32mins

4 Dec 2017