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Noel Rappin

24 Podcast Episodes

Latest 3 Dec 2022 | Updated Daily

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Modern Front-End Developent For Rails with Noel Rappin

Polyglot

Relicans host, Kirk Haines talks to Noel Rappin about the new book he has coming out: “Modern Front-End Development for Rails,” which is in part about what is interesting about Hotwire, Stimulus, and Turbo and what they bring to the table that's different than what people might be used to right now when it comes to web development, and talks about writing technical books for close to 20 years. Noel says, “It's a lot of time that goes into something that you can't control. You can't control what the world's going to be like when you put it out. You can't control whether people are still going to be interested in it. You can't control whether something's going to make it obsolete two weeks after it comes out.”This is why he’s also started playing around with releasing newsletters like buttondown.email/noelrap.Should you find a burning need to share your thoughts or rants about the show, please spray them at devrel@newrelic.com. While you're going to all the trouble of shipping us some bytes, please consider taking a moment to let us know what you'd like to hear on the show in the future. Despite the all-caps flaming you will receive in response, please know that we are sincerely interested in your feedback; we aim to appease. Follow us on the Twitters: @PolyglotShow.

39mins

28 Jul 2021

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002 - Stimulus and Webpacker with Noel Rappin

Code with Jason

In today's episode, I talk to developer and author Noel Rappin about Webpack, Webpacker, and Stimulus.Noel Rappin on TwitterNoel Rappin's WebsiteTech Done Right PodcastTable XITake My Money: Accepting Payments on the Web

32mins

1 May 2019

Similar People

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Noel Rappin from Tech Done Right

From the Beginning

In this episode we’re talking with Noel Rappin, Principal Software Engineer at TableXI and host of Tech Done Right, which is Table XI’s podcast about building software to develop better careers, companies, and communities.We talk with Noel about the benefits of having a rotating co-host, the difficulty of bootstrapping online community discussions and what’s motivating vs what feels like work when it comes to podcasting.  Be sure to connect with Noel, Table XI and Tech Done Right: Noel Rappin (@noelrap) TableXI (@tablexi) Tech Done Right (@tech_done_right) Other Podcasts Mentioned: Greater Than Code Tech Done Right episode with Dr. Ed Livingston, the Voice of JAMA  JAMA podcast app Connect with Dante32:WebsiteTwitterEnjoying the Show?Please subscribe and leave a much-appreciated review in Apple Podcasts!

30mins

18 Oct 2018

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089: Something Something Agile with Noel Rappin

Greater Than Code

Greater Than Code Episode 001: Taking Payments on the Web with Noel Rappin 02:58 – Noel’s Superpower: Extrapolating and Explaining Consequences of Tech Decisions to Others 06:24 – Cultural Patterns of How Organizations Develop Software; Should this process be standardized? 16:07 – Agile Adoption: Pros and Cons The Leprechauns of Software Engineering: How folklore turns into fact and what to do about it by Laurent Bossavit The Journal of Irreproducible Results 26:40 – Making Decisions Without No Scientific Evidence 32:05 – Metaphors for Software Engineering and Legitimizing the Profession 38:33 – Trust-Driven Development 44:12 – Decision Making Among Teams Reflections: Rein: We are working with systems that we can’t fully define and the idea that we’re acting on systems that we’re a part of. Therefore, it changes the observer effect. Jessica: Getting the ships to all go in the same direction. Coraline: The understanding of our place in a given context. Noel: Aligning process, values, culture, and goals, and doing that to make teams work better. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep of DevReps, LLC. To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode. To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps. You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Amazon links may be affiliate links, which means you’re supporting the show when you purchase our recommendations. Thanks!Special Guest: Noel Rappin.Support Greater Than Code

57mins

18 Jul 2018

Most Popular

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MRS 014 My Ruby Story Noel Rappin

Ruby Rogues

MRS 014 Noel Rappin Today's episode is a My Ruby Story with Noel Rappin. Noel talked about his contributions to the Ruby community and how they explore new technologies like Elixir. Listen to learn more about Noel! [00:01:40] – Introduction to Noel Rappin Noel is in episodes 30, which was about Software Craftsmanship. He was also on episode 185, which was about Rails 4 Test Prescriptions. And then, the latest one was 281, which was about Take My Money. [00:02:45] – How did you get into programming? Noel is a stereotypical nerdy kid so he started programming when he was young. He had afterschool classes in Applesoft BASIC at a place near their house. He had TRS-80 and Texas Instruments, and a couple of other things. [00:03:35] – Computer Science degree Noel has a Computer Science degree and a Ph.D. from the College of Computing at Georgia Tech, which was in the intersection of user interface design and Ed tech. He was designing interfaces for teaching, specifically for teaching engineers and developers. [00:04:15] – How did you get into Ruby? Noel came out of grad school immediately and went to a small web development company. He started hearing about Rails in about 2005. Having been one of the people who have done a lot of the Java-Struts web development that Rails was created in opposition to, Noel searched it up pretty quickly. But he started using it in 2005 or 2006 for some internal tools for his team. He built a test tracker and other things that his team is using internally. He built a couple of web apps for them to collaborate because they were working with some developers in Poland. And as he got comfortable with it, he contracted to do a Ruby on Rails book and got a full-time professional Ruby job. [00:06:30] – What is it about Ruby that got you excited? Noel has always like scripting languages and dynamic languages. He did a lot of work on Python for a while. It was extraordinary how quickly you do things in Rails compared to Java tools, even compared to Django, which was more or less contemporaneous. Ruby emphasized testing and Rails was very similar to some of the tools that he was building in Python. [00:08:50] – Books and contributions to the Ruby community Noel had a book which was out of date, 30 to 40 seconds after it was published. It’s normal in this industry. Sometime after that, he started publishing Rails Test Prescriptions and submitted it to the Pragmatic Bookshelf, and they purchased it. They published Rails Test Prescription 6 years. After that, he did a series of self-published JavaScript books called Master Space and Time with JavaScript. They are also out of date but they’re free now. He also did a self-published book about projects called Trust-Driven Development that you can still get. He did a book about purchasing, handling money and web purchases, and mostly this API called Take My Money, which came out last summer. Noel is currently working on a Rails 5 Test Prescriptions, which will include all the new Rails 5.1. It will come out this fall. [00:10:35] – Table XI Noel works at Table XI, which is a web consulting firm in Chicago with about 35 people. They do Rails development, websites, mobile development and a lot of React Native development. They build websites for companies that are not web software companies but companies that need web pages like non-profit or start-ups. They like to focus on solid business problems in software, rather than technology problems in software. [00:11:15] – What are you working on these days? Noel has his own podcast called Tech Done Right. The latest episode was with Michael Feathers. There is also an episode with somebody who is in charge of the Medicare Program under President Obama, who was actually the person who was called in to fix healthcare.gov and had some interesting stories about what that was like from a software manager perspective. From the development side, Noel has been doing a lot of Rails development, some JavaScript development, building purchase-sides for nonprofit, and doing a lot of upgrade work recently. [00:12:40] – Rails upgrades story This upgrade was for a Rails 2 application that was still in active development. The Rails community, at one point, was so bad at managing upgrades. And now, it does seem like the community has gotten better at managing new tools without breaking old ones. The security needs have pushed people towards the best practices. [00:14:15] – Ruby and Elixir Like a lot of Ruby companies, they’ve been exploring what the next tools are. They ran an Elixir project. It’s originally an internal prototype, which is a great way to get new technologies into the company. They wound up building a small project that was largely API focused. That’s the kind of thing that Rails is not super great at. They’re exploring what to do with front-end because there’s a sharp understanding of what Ruby on Rails is good for and what might be the purview of other tools. Elixir does a couple of things that Ruby doesn’t do very well. A lot of people who start with Ruby can learn a lot from going off to a functional language like Elixir or something that has a pattern-matching type of language like Elixir. Picks Noel Rappin R programming Podcast: Tech Done Right Author: Martha Wells The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Well Atom Editor Audio Hijack Bear Twitter @noelrap noelrappin.com Charles Max Wood Mighty Mug Phrase Express

26mins

2 Aug 2017

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MRS 014 My Ruby Story Noel Rappin

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

MRS 014 Noel Rappin Today's episode is a My Ruby Story with Noel Rappin. Noel talked about his contributions to the Ruby community and how they explore new technologies like Elixir. Listen to learn more about Noel! [00:01:40] – Introduction to Noel Rappin Noel is in episodes 30, which was about Software Craftsmanship. He was also on episode 185, which was about Rails 4 Test Prescriptions. And then, the latest one was 281, which was about Take My Money. [00:02:45] – How did you get into programming? Noel is a stereotypical nerdy kid so he started programming when he was young. He had afterschool classes in Applesoft BASIC at a place near their house. He had TRS-80 and Texas Instruments, and a couple of other things. [00:03:35] – Computer Science degree Noel has a Computer Science degree and a Ph.D. from the College of Computing at Georgia Tech, which was in the intersection of user interface design and Ed tech. He was designing interfaces for teaching, specifically for teaching engineers and developers. [00:04:15] – How did you get into Ruby? Noel came out of grad school immediately and went to a small web development company. He started hearing about Rails in about 2005. Having been one of the people who have done a lot of the Java-Struts web development that Rails was created in opposition to, Noel searched it up pretty quickly. But he started using it in 2005 or 2006 for some internal tools for his team. He built a test tracker and other things that his team is using internally. He built a couple of web apps for them to collaborate because they were working with some developers in Poland. And as he got comfortable with it, he contracted to do a Ruby on Rails book and got a full-time professional Ruby job. [00:06:30] – What is it about Ruby that got you excited? Noel has always like scripting languages and dynamic languages. He did a lot of work on Python for a while. It was extraordinary how quickly you do things in Rails compared to Java tools, even compared to Django, which was more or less contemporaneous. Ruby emphasized testing and Rails was very similar to some of the tools that he was building in Python. [00:08:50] – Books and contributions to the Ruby community Noel had a book which was out of date, 30 to 40 seconds after it was published. It’s normal in this industry. Sometime after that, he started publishing Rails Test Prescriptions and submitted it to the Pragmatic Bookshelf, and they purchased it. They published Rails Test Prescription 6 years. After that, he did a series of self-published JavaScript books called Master Space and Time with JavaScript. They are also out of date but they’re free now. He also did a self-published book about projects called Trust-Driven Development that you can still get. He did a book about purchasing, handling money and web purchases, and mostly this API called Take My Money, which came out last summer. Noel is currently working on a Rails 5 Test Prescriptions, which will include all the new Rails 5.1. It will come out this fall. [00:10:35] – Table XI Noel works at Table XI, which is a web consulting firm in Chicago with about 35 people. They do Rails development, websites, mobile development and a lot of React Native development. They build websites for companies that are not web software companies but companies that need web pages like non-profit or start-ups. They like to focus on solid business problems in software, rather than technology problems in software. [00:11:15] – What are you working on these days? Noel has his own podcast called Tech Done Right. The latest episode was with Michael Feathers. There is also an episode with somebody who is in charge of the Medicare Program under President Obama, who was actually the person who was called in to fix healthcare.gov and had some interesting stories about what that was like from a software manager perspective. From the development side, Noel has been doing a lot of Rails development, some JavaScript development, building purchase-sides for nonprofit, and doing a lot of upgrade work recently. [00:12:40] – Rails upgrades story This upgrade was for a Rails 2 application that was still in active development. The Rails community, at one point, was so bad at managing upgrades. And now, it does seem like the community has gotten better at managing new tools without breaking old ones. The security needs have pushed people towards the best practices. [00:14:15] – Ruby and Elixir Like a lot of Ruby companies, they’ve been exploring what the next tools are. They ran an Elixir project. It’s originally an internal prototype, which is a great way to get new technologies into the company. They wound up building a small project that was largely API focused. That’s the kind of thing that Rails is not super great at. They’re exploring what to do with front-end because there’s a sharp understanding of what Ruby on Rails is good for and what might be the purview of other tools. Elixir does a couple of things that Ruby doesn’t do very well. A lot of people who start with Ruby can learn a lot from going off to a functional language like Elixir or something that has a pattern-matching type of language like Elixir. Picks Noel Rappin R programming Podcast: Tech Done Right Author: Martha Wells The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Well Atom Editor Audio Hijack Bear Twitter @noelrap noelrappin.com Charles Max Wood Mighty Mug Phrase Express

26mins

2 Aug 2017

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MRS 014 My Ruby Story Noel Rappin

My Ruby Story

MRS 014 Noel RappinToday's episode is a My Ruby Story with Noel Rappin. Noel talked about his contributions to the Ruby community and how they explore new technologies like Elixir. Listen to learn more about Noel![00:01:40] – Introduction to Noel RappinNoel is in episodes 30, which was about Software Craftsmanship. He was also on episode 185, which was about Rails 4 Test Prescriptions. And then, the latest one was 281, which was about Take My Money.[00:02:45] – How did you get into programming?Noel is a stereotypical nerdy kid so he started programming when he was young. He had afterschool classes in Applesoft BASIC at a place near their house. He had TRS-80 and Texas Instruments, and a couple of other things.[00:03:35] – Computer Science degreeNoel has a Computer Science degree and a Ph.D. from the College of Computing at Georgia Tech, which was in the intersection of user interface design and Ed tech. He was designing interfaces for teaching, specifically for teaching engineers and developers.[00:04:15] – How did you get into Ruby?Noel came out of grad school immediately and went to a small web development company. He started hearing about Rails in about 2005. Having been one of the people who have done a lot of the Java-Struts web development that Rails was created in opposition to, Noel searched it up pretty quickly. But he started using it in 2005 or 2006 for some internal tools for his team.He built a test tracker and other things that his team is using internally. He built a couple of web apps for them to collaborate because they were working with some developers in Poland. And as he got comfortable with it, he contracted to do a Ruby on Rails book and got a full-time professional Ruby job.[00:06:30] – What is it about Ruby that got you excited?Noel has always like scripting languages and dynamic languages. He did a lot of work on Python for a while. It was extraordinary how quickly you do things in Rails compared to Java tools, even compared to Django, which was more or less contemporaneous. Ruby emphasized testing and Rails was very similar to some of the tools that he was building in Python.[00:08:50] – Books and contributions to the Ruby communityNoel had a book which was out of date, 30 to 40 seconds after it was published. It’s normal in this industry. Sometime after that, he started publishing Rails Test Prescriptions and submitted it to the Pragmatic Bookshelf, and they purchased it. They published Rails Test Prescription 6 years. After that, he did a series of self-published JavaScript books called Master Space and Time with JavaScript.They are also out of date but they’re free now. He also did a self-published book about projects called Trust-Driven Development that you can still get. He did a book about purchasing, handling money and web purchases, and mostly this API called Take My Money, which came out last summer.Noel is currently working on a Rails 5 Test Prescriptions, which will include all the new Rails 5.1. It will come out this fall.[00:10:35] – Table XINoel works at Table XI, which is a web consulting firm in Chicago with about 35 people. They do Rails development, websites, mobile development and a lot of React Native development. They build websites for companies that are not web software companies but companies that need web pages like non-profit or start-ups. They like to focus on solid business problems in software, rather than technology problems in software.[00:11:15] – What are you working on these days?Noel has his own podcast called Tech Done Right. The latest episode was with Michael Feathers. There is also an episode with somebody who is in charge of the Medicare Program under President Obama, who was actually the person who was called in to fix healthcare.gov and had some interesting stories about what that was like from a software manager perspective.From the development side, Noel has been doing a lot of Rails development, some JavaScript development, building purchase-sides for nonprofit, and doing a lot of upgrade work recently.[00:12:40] – Rails upgrades storyThis upgrade was for a Rails 2 application that was still in active development. The Rails community, at one point, was so bad at managing upgrades. And now, it does seem like the community has gotten better at managing new tools without breaking old ones. The security needs have pushed people towards the best practices.[00:14:15] – Ruby and ElixirLike a lot of Ruby companies, they’ve been exploring what the next tools are. They ran an Elixir project. It’s originally an internal prototype, which is a great way to get new technologies into the company. They wound up building a small project that was largely API focused. That’s the kind of thing that Rails is not super great at. They’re exploring what to do with front-end because there’s a sharp understanding of what Ruby on Rails is good for and what might be the purview of other tools. Elixir does a couple of things that Ruby doesn’t do very well. A lot of people who start with Ruby can learn a lot from going off to a functional language like Elixir or something that has a pattern-matching type of language like Elixir.PicksNoel Rappin R programming Podcast: Tech Done Right Author: Martha Wells The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Well Atom Editor Audio Hijack Bear Twitter @noelrap noelrappin.com Charles Max Wood Mighty Mug Phrase Express

26mins

2 Aug 2017

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Noel Rappin, Author of Trust-Driven Development

Frontmatter

In this interview, Leanpub co-founder Len Epp talks with Noel about his first encounters with computers, his career, the challenges that come with software consulting and client management and in particular the importance of trust, his book, and at the end they talk a little bit about his experience as a conventionally published and as a self-published writer.

48mins

19 May 2017

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Ep. 131 - Take My Money (Noel Rappin)

CodeNewbie

If you plan on getting a job as a developer, chances are, you’ll deal with the technical side of accepting online payments. It might be as easy as plugging in a tool like Stripe or Braintree, but it can quickly get complicated. In this more technical episode, Noel takes us through some of those thorny situations and how a newbie can navigate the complex world of money. Show Links Turing (sponsor) Microsoft (sponsor) Stellar (sponsor) Code Complete Apple IIe Zork The Pragmatic Programmer The Money Gem Shopify IRB Floating Point VCR gem AJAX Stripe Codeland Conf Codeland 2019 Noel RappinNoel Rappin is the Director of Talent and a Senior Developer at Table XI (tablexi.com). He is the author of multiple technical books including “Rails 4 Test Prescriptions”, “Trust-Driven Development”, and “Master Space and Time With JavaScript”.

45mins

13 Mar 2017

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58: Noel Rappin - Fixing Common Payment Handling Mistakes

Full Stack Radio

As I mention in the show, if you've been thinking about checking out Test-Driven Laravel, the course is still available at the early access price for the next few weeks:Learn more about Test-Driven Laravel Early AccessSponsors: Rollbar, sign up at https://rollbar.com/fullstackradio to try their Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days Hired, sign up at https://www.hired.com/fullstackradio to double your signing bonus to $2000 if you get a job through Hired Links: Test-Driven Laravel, Adam's TDD course Noel's blog Rails 4 Test Prescriptions, Noel's book on testing Take My Money, Noel's book on payment handling Noel's screencast on floating point precision RubyMoney gem ngrok vcr gem

40mins

8 Feb 2017

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