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Roger McIntyre

14 Podcast Episodes

Latest 12 Jun 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Dr. Roger McIntyre

Hal Anderson

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

8mins

29 Apr 2021

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E105 - Extended Q&A NEI Synapse Half-Day on The Cutting-Edge of Mood Disorders with Dr. Roger McIntyre

NEI Podcast

What is the evidence that obesity leaves one vulnerable to bipolar disorder? Which of your patients with bipolar disorder would you refer for TMS and what has been the outcome in your experience? Have you seen development of mania with this treatment? What impact or changes have you seen in your bipolar patients who have suffered with COVID? In this Bonus episode of the NEI Podcast, Dr. Roger McIntyre addresses these questions and more unanswered questions from the Q&A session for our NEI Synapse Half-Day on The Cutting-Edge of Mood Disorders. Dr. Roger S. McIntyre is currently a Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology at the University of Toronto and Head of the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit at the University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. Dr. McIntyre is also Executive Director of the Brain and Cognition Discovery Foundation in Toronto, Canada. Dr. McIntyre is involved in multiple research endeavors which primarily aim to characterize the association between mood disorders, notably cognitive function and medical comorbidity. His works broadly aims to characterize the underlying causes of cognitive impairment in individuals with mood disorders and their impact on workplace functioning. This body of work has provided a platform for identifying novel molecular targets to treat and prevent mood disorders and accompanying cognitive impairment. Dr. McIntyre is a contributor to the “Florida Medicaid Drug Therapy Management Program for Behavioral Health: Guidelines for the treatment of adults with Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder”. Dr. McIntyre is also the co-chair of the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Task Force on the Treatment of Comorbidity in Adults with Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar Disorder and as well a contributor to the “CANMAT Guidelines for the Treatment of Depressive Disorders and Bipolar Disorders”. Dr. McIntyre has published hundreds of peer-reviewed articles and has edited and/or co-edited several textbooks on mood disorders. To register for Synapse Half-Days go to: https://www.neiglobal.com/Synapse/SynOverview/tabid/468/Default.aspx

55mins

28 Apr 2021

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E104 - PsychopharmaStahlogy Show: Treatment Resistant Depression and Suicide Prevention: Hot Off the Press Ketamine Guidelines with Dr. Roger McIntyre

NEI Podcast

What do clinicians need to know about the pharmacokinetics of ketamine, especially when it comes to drug-drug interactions? What is the abuse potential for ketamine and for esketamine? What are some ways that clinicians can mitigate the risk of abuse? At this time, what is the consensus, in comparing the efficacy of ketamine and esketamine for treatment resistant depression? In this episode, Dr. Andrew Cutler interviews Dr. Roger McIntyre and Dr. Stephen Stahl on their recent publication in the American Journal of Psychiatry. To access the article click on the link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33726522/ Dr. Roger S. McIntyre is currently a Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology at the University of Toronto and Head of the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit at the University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. Dr. McIntyre is also Executive Director of the Brain and Cognition Discovery Foundation in Toronto, Canada. Dr. McIntyre was named by Thomson Reuters in 2014 and 2015, as one of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds”. This distinction is given by publishing the largest number of articles that rank among those most frequently cited by researchers globally in 21 broad fields of science and social science during the previous decade. Dr. McIntyre is involved in multiple research endeavors which primarily aim to characterize the association between mood disorders, notably cognitive function and medical comorbidity. His works broadly aims to characterize the underlying causes of cognitive impairment in individuals with mood disorders and their impact on workplace functioning. This body of work has provided a platform for identifying novel molecular targets to treat and prevent mood disorders and accompanying cognitive impairment. With this special series, brought to you by the NEI Podcast we will address a different theme in psychopharmacology every 3 months. Each theme is split into 3 parts, with one part released each month. The second theme is treatment-resistant depression and suicide prevention. Episodes to be released under this theme include: Part 1: Treatment Resistant Depression and Suicide Prevention: Hot Off the Press Ketamine Guidelines with Dr. Roger McIntyre Part 2: Shelter-In-Place During the Storm: Mental Health Consequences and Suicide Prevention During the COVID-19 Pandemic with Dr. Roger McIntyre Part 3: Beyond the Storm: An Update on Suicide Prevention and The Suicide Prevention Handbook with Dr. Christine Moutier Subscribe to the NEI Podcast, so that you don’t miss another episode!

59mins

21 Apr 2021

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Roger McIntyre - What is Brain fog, how does it alter your brain, and is it permanent?

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Guest Host Arlene Bynon speaks with Roger McIntyre, Prof. of Psychiatry and Pharmacology and UofT. Head of Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit at the University Health Network. They talk about the becoming more commonplace term "Brain Fog." What it really means, who it affects, and how to clear the fog.  Let's Get TalkingSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

8mins

16 Apr 2021

Most Popular

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Roger McIntyre - What does our fear response have to do with Protests

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Guest Host Arlene Bynon speaks with Roger McIntyre, a Prof. of Psychiatry and Pharmacology at the University of Toronto,  Head of Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit at the University Health Network. They discuss the rise of protests and rallies during this 3rd wave, and how the human brain is wired to handle the stress.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

9mins

13 Apr 2021

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Episode 25 – Fight depression, suicide and be healthier with Dr. Roger McIntyre

NYCTalking Podcast

Today I am joined by Dr. Roger McIntyre, he's a psychiatrist and professor who deals in among other things, mood disorders. We talk about seasonal depression, how the suicide rates are up in this country, the dangers of uncertainty and how we can fight all this and stay healthy both physically and mentally!--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nyctalking/message

35mins

2 Nov 2020

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Dr. Roger McIntyre

NL Newsday with Jeff Andreas

COVID-19 continues to impact our mental health and as we head towards winter that of course leads to many people suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder. The Director of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance from Chicago Dr. Roger McIntyre discusses mental health concerns and how people can cope. 

12mins

29 Oct 2020

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Dr Roger McIntyre

The Michael Berry Show

This World-leading mental health researcher says we are staring down "The Perfect Storm" for a long-running mental health crisis. (Covid Related). "Mental health needs to take center stage in guiding our leaders in the right direction during re-opening, " says Dr. Roger McIntyre, "The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is affecting everyone's mental health in ways small and large and you will see the effects for years to come.

18mins

21 Sep 2020

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COVID-19, the ‘echo pandemic’ of suicide and mental illness, and the need to virtualize health care to mitigate risks with Dr. Roger McIntyre

Psychcast

Roger S. McIntyre, MD, returns the Psychcast, this time to talk with host Lorenzo Norris, MD, about the mental health hazards of COVID-19 and what clinicians can do to help protect patients. Dr. McIntyre is professor of psychiatry and pharmacology, and head of the mood disorders psychopharmacology unit at the University Health Network at the University of Toronto. He disclosed receiving research or grants from the Stanley Medical Research Institute and the CIHR/GACD/National Natural Science Foundation of China. Dr. McIntyre also disclosed receiving consultation/speaker fees from several pharmaceutical companies. Dr. Norris has no disclosures.  Take-home points Uncertainty tied to the COVID-19 pandemic threatens to undermine mental health and exacerbate problems for those with mental illness. U.S. suicide rates, which were already rising after the Great Recession of 2007-2009, are likely to climb further because of the impact of COVID-19. Clinicians can take steps to prevent some of the negative mental health outcomes tied to the pandemic. Summary COVID-19 presents a triple threat to patients' mental health. The fear of viral infection is a mental health hazard. The financial shock that COVID-19 has had on the economy has not been seen since the Great Depression. Links between suicide and unemployment are powerful. In a study published in World Psychiatry, McIntyre and colleagues found associations between COVID-19 and major depression, PTSD, binge alcohol use, and substance use disorders. French social scientist Emile Durheim, PhD described the link between suicide and unemployment. Quarantining affects mental health, and there is nothing like COVID-19 in the history books. The Toronto experience with severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2003 offers lessons about the devastating impact of quarantining on mental health. “Deaths of despair” in the form of suicides have been on the increase in the United States. From the Great Recession, researchers found that for every 1% increase in unemployment, there is a commensurate 1% increase in suicide. U.S. unemployment stood at 8%-9% during the Great Recession, and now those percentages are much higher. Dr. McIntyre and his team projected that an unemployment rate of 14%-20% would lead to an additional 8,000-10,000 suicides could occur each year for the next 2 years. That’s in addition to the current number of approximately 50,000 suicides annually. Express Scripts, a pharmacy benefits manager, recently reported a 40% increase in prescriptions for anxiety-related medications. This suggests that people are distressed. Clinicians should take an aspirational approach to addressing these issues by pivoting to virtual platforms to increase patients’ access to care. Create medical homes that are HIPAA compliant. Look toward evidence-based models such as those found in Japan. That country found that, for every 0.2% increase in GDP spending on mental health care right after the Great Recession, the suicide rate fell by 1%. Encourage patients to structure the day and avoid consuming too much news or participating on social media. Two studies conducted in China found that people who spent more than 2-3 hours a day on news consumption were more likely to report clinical levels of depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Social media consumption has been associated with many adverse mental health outcomes, including loneliness. People who spent more than 3 hours a day were more likely to experience depression. Support programs for small-business people; jobs enhance resilience. Target the “basics” of self-care, such as getting enough sleep and engaging with others. References McIntyre RS, Lee Y. Psychiatry Res. 2020 May 19. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2020.113104. McIntyre RS, Lee Y. World Psychiatry. 2020 Jun;19(2):250-1. Shanahan L et al. Am J Public Health. 2012 Jun;109(6):854-8. Kang S, Chua HC. CMAJ. 2004 Mar 2;170(5):811-2. Express Scripts. America’s State of Mind Report. 2020 Apr 16. Lee Y et al. Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2020 Jul 1. doi: 10.1111/pch.13101. Hao F et al. Brain Behav Immun. 2020 Jul;87:100-6. Tan W et al. Brain Behav Immun. 2020 Jul;87:84-92. Wang C et al. Brain Behav Immun. 2020 Jul;87:40-8. Harvey SB et al. Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Jan 1;175(1):28-36. *  *  * For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com

42mins

15 Jul 2020

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Innovating Depression Treatment Protocols by Using Party Drugs and Psychedelics with Roger McIntyre, MD, world renowned psychiatrist

Bright Spots in Healthcare

Many people know ketamine as a party or street drug but it now used as a novel treatment for patients with treatment-resistant depression. Depression is a common illness worldwide with the World Health Organization reporting more than 264 million people are affected. A large percentage of patients with depression do not respond to standard treatment, leading doctors to find novel treatments for depression including the use of oral ketamine.  Dr. Roger McIntyre, a professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the University of Toronto founded the Canadian Rapid Treatment Centre of Excellence in a suburb of Toronto, Canada to offer intravenous ketamine infusion therapy to patients with mood disorders.  During the podcast, Dr. McIntyre talks about which patients are good candidates for ketamine use, the proper dosage, and any potential side effects. Dr. McIntyre also talks about the components of a ketamine therapy program, the challenges he faced building his clinic, and what he might do differently if starting again. 

43mins

12 Jul 2020

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