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Nicky Pellegrino

11 Podcast Episodes

Latest 8 Jan 2022 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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The Panel with Nicky Pellegrino and Conor English (Part 2)

The Panel

Panellists Nicky Pellegrino and Conor English discuss BNZs lending limits, the opposition to the All Blacks being sponsored by an oil, gas and plastics company, and dirty pillows. Participants: Sir Bob Harvey, Glen McLeod, Stephen Archer

24mins

29 Oct 2021

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The Panel with Nicky Pellegrino and Conor English (Part 1)

The Panel

Panellists Nicky Pellegrino and Conor English discuss vaccine mandates in workplaces, dodgy roads and the 1pm press conference Participants: Stephen Croucher, Clive Matthew-Wilson

23mins

29 Oct 2021

Similar People

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The Panel with Nicky Pellegrino and Allan Blackman (Part 2)

The Panel

Trump nearly concedes as presidential transition begins; Helen Clark Foundation recommends increasing minimum wage; Calls for a four year government term to be considered; Rum and raisin balls blamed for failed breath test.

25mins

24 Nov 2020

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The Panel with Nicky Pellegrino and Allan Blackman (Part 1)

The Panel

Report on DNA use and storage released, recommending changes; Tourism professor calls for backpackers to return post-COVID.

22mins

24 Nov 2020

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Nicky Pellegrino changes course for new novel Tiny Pieces of Us

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin

Nicky Pellegrino has described her new book as her most dramatic and moving novel, which is probably quite apt given the world at the moment and drama and disruption around its initial launch.Originally set to be released in March, Pellegrino's twelfth novel, Tiny Pieces of Us, sees the recipient of a heart transplant drawn into a quest by the mother of the donor to find everyone else that received organ donations from her son. It is a change from Pellegrino's past novels of food, feuds, family and love in Italy inspired by her childhood holidays spent in her father’s home town of Naples.Four months after the book was originally set to be released, Pellegrino joins Francesca Rudkin to discuss the shift from writing about Italy, her inspiration for talking about organ donation, and getting through lockdown.LISTEN ABOVE

15mins

4 Jul 2020

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Nicky Pellegrino – Tiny Pieces of Us

The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

Jenny Wheeler: Nicky Pellegrino's last book was called A Dream of Italy and it was one of the hottest sellers of 2019. Now she's back with a new heart wrencher, Tiny Pieces of Us, combining her familiar themes of friendship, food, and romance, but this time underlined with a gritty story.Hi there, I'm your host, Jenny Wheeler, and in today's binge reading episode, Nicky talks about the new book, her new podcast and the big life changes she’s facing that are creating new opportunities.To celebrate the launch of Tiny Pieces of Us, we've got three digital copies to give away to three lucky readers. Enter the draw on our website, thejoysofbingereading.com or on our Binge Reading Facebook page.  The website also has links to Nicky’s other books and the podcast, if you want to catch up with that. While you're there, leave us a comment. We love to hear from you.  Six things you’ll learn from this Joys of Binge Reading episode:The real story about organ transplants'Winning formula'' with a gritty edgeOn not living a safe small lifeMourning the loss of a slew of magazinesAn exciting new book podcastLearning new things under challenging circumstancesWhere to find Nicky Pellegrino: Website: https://www.nickypellegrino.com/#homeFacebook: @nickypellegrinoauthorTwitter: @nickypellegrinoWhat follows is a "near as" transcript of our conversation, not word for word but pretty close to it, with links to important mentions.Jenny Wheeler: But now, here’s Nicky. Hello there, Nicky, and welcome to the show. It's great to have you with us.Nicky Pellegrino: Thanks for having me on.Introducing Nicky PellegrinoJenny Wheeler: You're very, very welcome. We're coming back for a second time but that's fully justified because there's been a heap happening in your life. You've got another new book out, you've started a podcast and there are also lots of other life changes going on. It seemed like a very good time to revisit what you're up to.Nicky Pellegrino - heartwarming romance and women's fictionNicky Pellegrino:  It does feel like a lot has happened. I think many people feel like that with the COVID-19 outbreak and the way it changed all our lives. So yes, it feels like there have been a lot of changes and there are probably quite a lot more ahead for me too.Jenny Wheeler: Your latest book, we'll get to that first. It's your twelfth, Tiny Pieces of Us, and its launch was somewhat disrupted by this pandemic, wasn't it? Tell us what happened.Nicky Pellegrino:  It was meant to come out right in the middle of level four on March 30th. We were going to have a big, fancy launch and I was going to go to lots of book festivals and I was very excited and of course, my diary is a mass of crossings out. None of that happened and the launch was postponed. It’s moved around a bit, but we've now settled on June 30th, the end of this month. Obviously there won't be the same big, fancy launch and masses of festivals, but I am hoping that we'll be back to normal by then and all the shops will be back to normal and people will be able to go and at least buy the book.A deeply emotional gritty storyJenny Wheeler: Perhaps I ought to interject here for those who aren't familiar with your work or haven't heard the first interview we did, because a lot of our listeners are in the States. You're one of New Zealand's most popular romance and women’s fiction authors, a name in this country. Everybody's heard of Nicky, but this one, Tiny Pieces of Us, is deeply emotional. It's a slightly darker theme than some of your previous books, isn’t it?A Dream of Italy - Nicky PellegrinoNicky Pellegrino: Yes. I think all my books have got the theme of friendship and food and Italy, but with each one I have tried to do something a little bit different with the structure. For instance, A Year at Hotel Gondola was a book within a book. It might not have been visible to the naked eye,

35mins

28 Jun 2020

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Tiny Pieces of Us by Nicky Pellegrino, read by Jane McDowell

Orion Books

Click here to buy: https://adbl.co/33A51G7My heart is less than 1% of my body, it weighs hardly anything; it is only a tiny piece of me, yet it is the part everyone finds most interesting.Vivi Palmer knows what it's like to live life carefully. Born with a heart defect, she was given a second chance after a transplant, but has never quite dared to make the most of it. Until she comes face-to-face with her donor's mother, Grace, who wants something in return for Vivi's second-hand heart: her help to find all the other people who have tiny pieces of her son.Reluctantly drawn into Grace's mission, Vivi's journalist training takes over as one by one she tracks down a small group of strangers. As their lives intertwine Vivi finds herself with a new kind of family, and by finding out more about all the pieces that make up the many parts of her, Vivi might just discover a whole new world waiting for her...

5mins

20 Mar 2020

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Nicky Pellegrino weighs in on controversial new novel American Dirt

Kerre McIvor Mornings Podcast

New Zealand author Nicky Pellegrino discusses controversial new novel American Dirt with Kerre McIvor above. CNN's Catherine E. Shoichet explores the debate below.Oprah Winfrey's new message is clear: You won't be able to put this book down."From the first page, the first sentence, I was in, I was open, I was shook up," she says in a video announcing the novel "American Dirt" as her next book club pick. "It woke me up, and I feel that everybody who reads this book is actually going to be immersed in the experience of what it means to be a migrant on the run for freedom."But some Latinos are responding with a message of their own: We won't be picking this book up, and neither should you."American Dirt" tells the story of a Mexican woman and her son fleeing to the US after a drug cartel massacre devastates their family. It's billed as "a 'Grapes of Wrath' for our times" and "a new American classic."But Jeanine Cummins, the author, isn't Mexican or a migrant. And for some would-be readers, that's a problem that can't be erased by plugs from celebrities or promotion from publishers.The novel, already being adapted into a movie, has become the latest flashpoint in a growing debate about representation, cultural appropriation and whether artists can -- or should -- tell stories about identities they don't know firsthand.It's an argument that's raged in response to music and movies, too -- remember when Jennifer Lopez sang Motown and Emma Stone played a character of Chinese and Hawaiian descent?And now the debate has detonated yet again, thanks to a 392-page book with barbed wire criss-crossing its cover.A book party with barbed wire decorationsOprah's Book Club picks have a reputation for their hefty influence in the publishing industry. Winning the billionaire's blessing can send a book to the top of the bestseller list as adoring fans and avid readers scramble to get a copy.It's been called "the Oprah Effect." Toni Morrison's books, for example, reportedly got more of a sales boost from Oprah's endorsements than from the author's Nobel Prize.That could happen for "American Dirt," too. Amazon is already listing the book among its most popular titles.Debate over "American Dirt" had already bubbled up before Oprah's announcement Tuesday. The book had garnered some rave reviews and praise from authors like Stephen King, Don Winslow and Sandra Cisneros, but also fierce criticism in some corners from reviewers who'd read it and some authors who vowed they never would.But when Oprah blessed the book, the conversation kicked into overdrive.Critics accuse Cummins -- who reportedly got a seven-figure book deal for "American Dirt" after a bidding war between publishing houses -- of relying on stereotypes to paint an inauthentic picture of Mexican migrants, and exploiting trauma and pain for profit.And their outrage grew this week as tweets surfaced showing the author celebrating the book at a dinner featuring floral centerpieces wrapped with barbed wire and sporting a manicure featuring the barbed wire design that's on her book cover.The author wrote that she 'wished someone slightly browner' would tell the storyIn an author's note included in the book, Cummins acknowledges she grappled with whether she should be the one to write it."I worried that my privilege would make me blind to certain truths, that I'd get things wrong, as I may well have. I worried that, as a nonmigrant and non-Mexican, I had no business writing a book set almost entirely in Mexico, set entirely among migrants. I wished someone slightly browner than me would write it," she says."But then, I thought, If you're a person who has the capacity to be a bridge, why not be a bridge? So I began."Cummins, who has described herself as white, also says in the note that her Puerto Rican grandmother's experience coming to the United States inspired her. She describes her research for "American Dirt" as "careful and deliberate.""I traveled extensively o...

9mins

26 Jan 2020

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Nicky Pellegrino – A Winning Formula

The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

Nicky Pellegrino’s readers tell her that if they can’t go to Italy on holiday, reading one of her eleven novels so full of friendship, laughter, beautiful Italian food and sunshine is the next best thing.HI there I’m your host Jenny Wheeler, and today Nicky talks about her affinity for all things Italian, the ‘Seize the Day’ experience that made her determined to write fiction, and  the foodie tour she’s leading to Sicily in 2020.Sixthings you’ll learn from this Joys of Binge Reading episode:The 'mistake' that led to a winning formulaWhy beginning is harder than finishingHer passion for all things ItalianThe 'Seize The Day' experience that got her startedWhy shegave up a magazine editorship to write booksThe blossoming of popular NZ women's fictionWhere to find Nicky Pellegrino: Website: https://www.nickypellegrino.com/Facebook: @nickypellegrinoauthorTwitter: @nickypellegrinoWhatfollows is a "near as" transcript of our conversation, not word forword but pretty close to it, with links to important mentions.Jenny: But now, here’s Nicky. Hello there Nicky and welcome to the show, it’s great to have you with us.Nicky Pellegrino; "uplit" fiction Was there a “Once Upon A Time’ moment when you decided you must write fiction or you would have somehow let yourself down, or not completed something you were meant to do?  And if so what was the catalyst for itNicky: Well I'd always wanted to write. It was why I became a journalist, because I'd come from a very ordinary working class Northern English background and I didn't know any writers. So that's why I went into journalism, because I thought 'one day I'll write a book.'I had lots of ideas - and ideas are the easy part. But I hadn't sat down and done anything about it. And then one day I was at work - I was deputy editor of the New Zealand Woman's Weekly - and I got an email from a friend who was in Television New Zealand at the time, to let me know that Angela d'Audney, who was a very well known New Zealander on television had been diagnosed with a brain tumor. She was terminally ill.A 'Seize the Day' momentI didn't know her well, she wasn't a personal friend. I had only interviewed her a couple of times, but it was one of those 'Seize the Day' moments. I knew she was only in her 50's and it made me think that you just don't know what's around the corner. I realized if there is something you want to do, you should really get to it and do it. And the thing I wanted to do was write this novel that was in my head. Delicious: Nicky PellegrinoI went home and that night I started writing Delicious, my first novel. I just plunged into it. I didn't have a plot, nor a character breakdown. I was working on an ancient computer that was made before email was invented, it was all very ill advised. But I just kept plugging away at nights, weekends and holidays - I did get a better computer - but I just kept going.In between all this Angela d'Audney had asked me to write a book with her and that was an amazing gift she gave me because I didn't know if I could write a book. And now she was running out of time and I had a publisher's deadline so I really couldn't waste time being insecure and worried about it. I just had to get on and do it.Finishing the BookSo I finished that book, and then going back into my own book seemed incredible because it didn't involve the sadness of seeing this friend who looked a little less well every time I visited her. Back in my own imaginary world with these characters I'd invented suddenly it felt "This is great!" That was it really, I was incredibly lucky to get a publishing deal for that first book. I am not one of those writers who have half finished manuscripts or rejected manuscripts lying around, everything I have started I've finished and it's been published which I think is a little unusual.Jenny: I think it is, yes.

37mins

1 Apr 2019

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2019-03-24 Interview: Nicky Pellegrino

Real Life with John Cowan

John Cowan interviews author, Nicky Pellegrino.

24mins

25 Mar 2019

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