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Dorothea Lange Podcasts

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13 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Dorothea Lange. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Dorothea Lange, often where they are interviewed.

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13 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Dorothea Lange. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Dorothea Lange, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Why Dorothea Lange still matters: Q&A with Oakland Museum's Drew Johnson

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The first part of this episode originally aired three years ago, when the Oakland Museum opened an exhibit of Dorothea Lange photos called Politics of Seeing. Now, the Oakland Museum is launching a huge digital archive of Lange’s work, so I’ve decided to re-run the original episode plus a new interview with Drew Johnson, OMCA’s Curator of Photography and Visual Culture, about why these photos are worth a new look in 2020.

Here’s the description for the original episode:

Dorothea Lange is one of the most famous photographers of all time, but the local work she did during her many decades as an East Bay resident is often overlooked. This episode explores how she went from taking portraits of the Bay Area’s wealthiest families to documenting the poor and working class. Dorothea’s goddaughter, Elizabeth Partridge, and Drew Johnson, curator of the Oakland Museum’s new Dorothea Lange exhibition, share insights on what makes her photographs so iconic—and why they’re still so relevant.

To see the Dorothea Lange Digital Archive, visit: https://dorothealange.museumca.org/

To see images and links to related to this story, visit: https://eastbayyesterday.com/

East Bay Yesterday can’t survive without your support. Please donate to keep this show alive: www.patreon.com/eastbayyesterday
Aug 18 2020 · 1hr 2mins
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029: Dorothea Lange

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How did one woman make a picture worth 20,000 lbs. of food? Listen to the incredible story of Dorothea Lange and how she was able to influence the government with her art.

May 31 2020 · 51mins
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Dorothea Lange, Soul of a Nation

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Episode No. 429 features curators Sarah Meister and Lauren Palmor.

On February 9, the Museum of Modern Art, New York opens "Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures," the first significant solo presentation of Lange's work at MoMA since this 1966 survey. The exhibition, which is drawn from MoMA's collection, was curated by Meister with River Bullock and Madeline Weisburg. It will be on view through May 9. It is accompanied by a book featuring contributions by Julie Ault, Sandy Phillips, Sally Mann, Wendy Red Star, and others. Amazon offers it for $55.

"Lange" specifically examines the way words -- including Lange's own, which Lange often presented in extended captions, and the words in Lange's photographs -- have guided our understanding of Lange's work.

Host Tyler Green and Meister discuss Lange and Pirkle Jones's 1956 series "Death of a Valley." See each picture on SFMOMA's website.

On the second segment, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco curator Lauren Palmor discusses additions FAMSF made to "Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983."  The exhibition, which is at the de Young Museum through March 15, examines art made during two decades during which Black political and cultural power ascended in the United States. "Soul of a Nation" originated at the Tate Modern and was curated by Mark Godfrey and Zoé Whitley. Palmor and a team of FAMSF curators added a range of Bay Area-made art to the exhibition.

Jan 23 2020 · 1hr 16mins
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Dorothea Lange, Nikon mirrorless and beer

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In this first episode, Mark and David look back at the recent major exhibition of Dorothea Lange's work at London's Barbican, and briefly discuss Nikon's new mirrorless cameras, whilst sampling a couple of nice beers and working on their microphone technique.

We've posted up some of the images we discuss on our Pinterest page for this episode.

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing was the first UK exhibition of the pioneering American social documentary photographer Dorothea Lange (1895–1965). It presents Lange as a critical and influential voice in twentieth-century photography, an activist and early environmental campaigner and a founding figure of photojournalism.

Although Lange is famous for her evocative portraits of Dust Bowl migrant workers, and the almost era-defining Migrant Mother image (one of 6 taken in 10 minutes), her work encompassed much more. The exhibition, divided into three sections (Great Depression, World War II and Postwar California), also briefly highlighted her early career as an in-demand studio photographer in San Francisco.

Lange's images from WWII are just as powerful as those from the depression. Pictures of Japanese-Americans under internment are particularly moving and topical. The Lange exhibition was so large and thought-provoking that perhaps it was almost too ambitious a subject for our first podcast, and we may well return to discuss her work at a later date.

Also we didn't have a chance to touch on the accompanying exhibition of contemporary photographer Vanessa Winship, whose work was fantastic.

We hold regular photo meet-ups in central London, all levels welcome - see Meetup for details. For more information about us and forthcoming podcasts, visit the PhotoChilli website, or get in touch on Twitter.

Music credit: DJ Quads

Sep 10 2018 · 1hr 31mins
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Outerfocus 24 - Dorothea Lange (Gonçalo Delgado)

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“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera” Dorothea Lange 

Welcome to the Outerfocus Podcast!

Joining us after a 2 minute photoshoot earlier in the day, we are pleased to be speaking this week with, Gonçalo Delgado. Growing up with a Father who was a photographer and his Mother a Painter, it’s not surprising Gonçalo embarked on a career as a photojournalist in 2006. Working for several agencies and undertaking a plethora of projects Gonçalo has had his work published around the world in publications such as La Republica, The Telegraph, The Wall Street Journal and many more.

We waste no time in discussing what Gonçalo has been working on recently and what his plans for the future are, including a project surrounding a national park in Portugal. We also talk about the impact camera equipment has on the progression of our photography, as well as some of Gonçalo’s favourite photography books. Ian also gives us an insight into what he has coming up soon.

History of photography for this weeks episode focuses on Dorothea Lange. Born in 1895 Dorothea was a photojournalist and documentary photographer from America, who was well known for humanising the consequences of the Great Depression. We look back at Lange’s education at Columbia University, where she was taught by Clarence H. White, a founding member of the Photo Secession movement and US photographer; and discuss her importance, work and more.

Links:

Dorothea Lange - Wikipedia

Guest Links: 

Gonçalo - Website

Instagram

Book recommendations:

Dies Irae - Paolo Pellegrin

<-------click book for purchase info

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/outerfocuspodcast)

Aug 22 2018 · 1hr 24mins
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Art Shots - Dorothea Lange, Vanessa Winship and Killed Negatives

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Two exhibitions for the price of one, and a free display! I went to Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing and Vanessa Winship: And Time Folds at the Barbican, and Killed Negatives: Unseen Images of 1930s America at the Whitechapel Gallery. So much documentary photography. All highly recommended.

Lange and Winship run until 2.09.2018 - information and tickets (£13.50/£9 students) here https://www.barbican.org.uk/whats-on/2018/event/dorothea-lange-vanessa-winship

Killed Negatives (admission free) runs until 26.08.2018 http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/killed-negatives-unseen-images-1930s-america/

Contact me via theexhibitionist.org, facebook.com/exhibitionistpod and exhibitionistpod@gmail.com, or on twitter @aaprocter to let me know what shows you'd like to see me review - and, as always, please leave a rating and review on iTunes. It helps new listeners find me, and makes me feel loved.
Aug 10 2018 · 24mins
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The Radio Ballads, Dorothea Lange, Archaeology of the A14

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Helen Castor is joined by Professor Lucy Robinson from the University of Sussex.

A new exhibition at the Barbican in London features the photography of Dorothea Lange who is best known for her coverage of the dust-bowl depression of mid-west America in the 1930s. Many of her now iconic images were actually staged - but does that alter their historical importance? Helen takes in the exhibition with the historian of race in modern America, Dr Melissa Milewski.

The 70th anniversary of the NHS at 70 is being marked across the BBC. In one of the more unusual ideas, Radio 3 are creating a symphony from the sounds that are commonplace in the health service. The inspiration for the piece comes from the "radio ballads" back in the late fifties and early sixties, produced by Charles Parker and featuring the music of Ewan McColl. Olivette Otele is a French-African historian who had never come across these radio programmes - so what can she glean about life in Britain sixty years ago by listening to them again?

And Tom Holland has a song of the road too. He's in Cambridgeshire, in the middle of Britain's biggest archaeological dig, where the A14 meets the A1 and a new historic landscape is being revealed.
Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.
Jul 03 2018 · 27mins
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John Wilmerding Symposium on American Art 2018, Part 10: Dorothea Lange’s Photographs

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Anne Whiston Spirn, author, photographer, landscape architect, and Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Landscape Architecture and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Many of Dorothea Lange’s photographs from the recent, important gift of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser appear in her books An American Exodus: A Record of Human Erosion (1939) and The American Country Woman (1967), in which she paired photographs to expand meaning. Speaking at the second annual John Wilmerding Symposium on American Art, held on March 23, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art, Anne Whiston Spirn looks at a selection of images from this collection in the context of the pair to which they belong and the captions that Lange wrote for them. “I used to think in terms of single photographs. The Bull’s-eye technique. No more. A photographic statement is what I now reach for. Therefore these pairs, like a statement of 2 words.” By the time she wrote this in 1958 Lange had been experimenting with pairing, sequencing, and captions for more than two decades. The John Wilmerding Symposium on American Art is made possible by a grant from the Walton Family Foundation.
Apr 17 2018 · 51mins
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“What about the underdog?”: Dorothea Lange never stopped fighting for freedom

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Dorothea Lange is one of the most famous photographers of all time, but the local work she did during her many decades as an East Bay resident is often overlooked. This episode explores how she went from taking portraits of the Bay Area’s wealthiest families to documenting the poor and working class. Dorothea’s goddaughter, Elizabeth Partridge, and Drew Johnson, curator of the Oakland Museum’s new Dorothea Lange exhibition, share insights on what makes her photographs so iconic—and why they’re still so relevant.

“Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing” is showing at the Oakland Museum of California from May 13 through August 13, 2017. For details, visit: http://museumca.org/exhibit/dorothea-lange-politics-seeing
May 11 2017 · 33mins
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Dorothea Lange

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Long, long after the death of LIFE and LOOK, we once again live in a world of images.  Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest all cater to that proverbial idea that a picture is worth a thousand words.  Yet perhaps it's because we have too many images, or that they are coming at us to fast, few truly capture the essence of any particular moment or ethos.However when we look back at the work of famed photographer Dorothea Lange, it’s different.  Her  striking black and white images taken during the depression years and depicting those on the margins of society, are a kind o tabula rosa for understanding a place, a time, a way of life.Dorothea Lange will soon be the subject of a PBS documentary  on the American Masters series, and Chronicle Books has just released a career spanning collection of her work entitled Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning. It is the companion book to the PBS documentary.  The new volume is written and curated by her goddaughter acclaimed biographer Elizabeth Partridge.My conversation with Elizabeth Partridge:
Jan 03 2014 · 25mins
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