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Thom Brooks

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Thom Brooks Interview

The Young Fabians Podcast

After a long hiatus... WE ARE BACK! This week's episode is an interview with Thom Brooks. Thom is an award-winning author, columnist, policy advisor, and political philosopher who is President of the Society of Legal Scholars and a member of the Fabian Society executive committee.He was joined by John Morgan, Chair of the Young Fabians Law Network, to discuss his work on migration policy and criminal justice as well as his involvement within the Labour Party and Fabian Society.Check out the Labour Academic Network!Speakers:John Morgan - https://twitter.com/jorgmorgThom Brooks - https://twitter.com/thom_brooksTo all our listeners: we want you in our podcast, so if you’re passionate about a topic just get in touch with us at podcast@youngfabians.org.ukFollow us on social media:https://www.facebook.com/PodcastYFhttps://twitter.com/PodcastYfDonate to the Young Fabians https://bit.ly/326RrJYThe intro music is by ‘One in a Googolplex' and used under Creative Commons. Find out more about them here:https://oneinagoogolplex.bandcamp.com/

53mins

18 Jun 2021

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The Secrets Behind Durham Law School's Success - Thom Brooks - S4E12

Legally Speaking Podcast

This week on the Legally Speaking Podcast, our host Robert Hanna speaks to Thom Brooks.  Thom is an award-winning author, columnist, policy advisor, academic and public speaker. He currently serves as Dean of Durham Law School, one of the UK's most prestigious undergraduate law departments. At Durham, he's led the biggest expansion in the schools's 50 year history, doubling the academic staff count from 42 to 75. Using data-driven US-style management techniques, he's shaken up the department to give it a more internationalist outlook and a research remit which aims to be more relevant to wider society.Alongside his demanding role, he frequently writes in the press, including for the likes of the Daily Telegraph, Guardian, Independent, Times and more. Originally from the United States, his background as a top legal academic and recent migrant has ensured he remains a popular source for public commentary in the fiery UK immigration debate.  He is also President of the Society of Legal Scholars and an Academic Bencher of the Inner Temple. Topics discussed include: Thom's career journey prior to becoming Dean of the Durham Law SchoolHow he's shaken up the department with a data-driven & internationalist mindsetHis work on making the school's research more relevant to policymaking & societyThe stark differences between UK and US law schoolsHis expert on the notorious SQEOut now on the Legally Speaking Podcast website and all major audio platforms.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/legallyspeakingpodcast)

38mins

7 Jun 2021

Similar People

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A Unified (and morally superior) Theory of Legal Punishment - Thom Brooks

Thesis

In this episode we explore the history and future of legal punishment. My guest today will give us an introduction to the debate around judicial sanctions and to the two dialectical forces that have historically driven it ‘retributivism’ and ‘consequentialism’. My guest Thom Brooks also lays out a vision for judicial punishment that may be able to resolve these conflicting views and explains how this new hybrid model may help us address some of the current moral short fallings in the American legal system

50mins

2 Jun 2021

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Thom Brooks & There is no Solving Climate Change

The Philosopher & The News

What if we’re been thinking about climate change the wrong way? What if it’s not a problem that can be solved, but something that can only be managed? What if climate change is here to stay? Thom Brooks is the author of Climate Change Ethics for an Endangered World. He is professor of Law and Government at the University of Durham, and the outgoing Dean of the Durham Law School. He is also a public policy advisor and the founding Director of the Labour Academic Network. This podcast is created in partnership with The Philosopher, the UK’s longest running public philosophy journal.  Register for free for the spring series of talks and events at: https://www.thephilosopher1923.org/events Music by Pataphysical Artwork by Nick Halliday

1hr 6mins

5 Apr 2021

Most Popular

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Immigration Policy w/ Thom Brooks

Debated Podcast

In this episode Will speaks to Dean of Durham University's Law School, Professor of Law and Government at Durham, member of the Fabian Society Executive, Advisor to the Labour Party and Chair of the Sedgefield Branch of the Sedgefield Constituency Labour Party, Thom Brooks. In the episode they discuss Thom's time advising Ed Miliband, Jeremy Corbyn and Keir Starmer; UK immigration policy; Shamima Begum's case before the Supreme Court; Brexit and this year's US Presidential Election. 

1hr 1min

4 Aug 2020

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Brexit, Trump, & Democracy with Thom Brooks

Why We Argue

Thom Brooks is Dean of Durham Law School, Professor of Law and Government, and Associate in the Department of Philosophy in the School of Government and International Affairs at Durham University. His academic work focuses on issues in Ethics, Criminal Law, and Public Policy. But he is widely known as an outspoken critic of the UK Citizenship Test. His most recent book is Becoming British: UK Citizenship Examined (Biteback Publishing 2016).The "Why We Argue" podcast is produced by the Humanities Institute at the University of Connecticut as part of the Humility and Conviction in Public Life project.

38mins

13 Jul 2017

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Thom Brooks, “Punishment” (Routledge, 2012)

New Books in Philosophy

Social stability and justice requires that we live together according to rules. And this in turn means that the rules must be enforced. Accordingly, we sometimes see fit to punish those who break the rules. Hence society features a broad system of institutions by which we punish. But there is a deep and longstanding philosophical disagreement over what, precisely, punishment is for. The standard views are easy to anticipate. Some say that we punish in order to give offenders what they deserve. Others claim that we punish in order to encourage others to obey the rules. Still others see punishment as a process of rehabilitating offenders. Recent theorists have attempted to combine these views in various ways. The debates go on.In his new book, Punishment (Routledge, 2012), Thom Brooks reviews the leading debates concerning punishment and makes a compelling case for a distinctive theory of punishment called the “unified theory.” Brooks contends that the unified theory can embrace several highly intuitive penal goals while avoiding the philosophical difficulties confronting each of the competing theories. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

1hr 24mins

1 Aug 2013

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Thom Brooks, “Punishment” (Routledge, 2012)

New Books in Political Science

Social stability and justice requires that we live together according to rules. And this in turn means that the rules must be enforced. Accordingly, we sometimes see fit to punish those who break the rules. Hence society features a broad system of institutions by which we punish. But there is a deep and longstanding philosophical disagreement over what, precisely, punishment is for. The standard views are easy to anticipate. Some say that we punish in order to give offenders what they deserve. Others claim that we punish in order to encourage others to obey the rules. Still others see punishment as a process of rehabilitating offenders. Recent theorists have attempted to combine these views in various ways. The debates go on.In his new book, Punishment (Routledge, 2012), Thom Brooks reviews the leading debates concerning punishment and makes a compelling case for a distinctive theory of punishment called the “unified theory.” Brooks contends that the unified theory can embrace several highly intuitive penal goals while avoiding the philosophical difficulties confronting each of the competing theories. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr 24mins

1 Aug 2013

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Thom Brooks, “Punishment” (Routledge, 2012)

New Books in Public Policy

Social stability and justice requires that we live together according to rules. And this in turn means that the rules must be enforced. Accordingly, we sometimes see fit to punish those who break the rules. Hence society features a broad system of institutions by which we punish. But there is a deep and longstanding philosophical disagreement over what, precisely, punishment is for. The standard views are easy to anticipate. Some say that we punish in order to give offenders what they deserve. Others claim that we punish in order to encourage others to obey the rules. Still others see punishment as a process of rehabilitating offenders. Recent theorists have attempted to combine these views in various ways. The debates go on.In his new book, Punishment (Routledge, 2012), Thom Brooks reviews the leading debates concerning punishment and makes a compelling case for a distinctive theory of punishment called the “unified theory.” Brooks contends that the unified theory can embrace several highly intuitive penal goals while avoiding the philosophical difficulties confronting each of the competing theories. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

1hr 24mins

1 Aug 2013