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Lula Wiles

16 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 Oct 2022 | Updated Daily

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Mali Obomsawin of Lula Wiles, ep. 126

Basic Folk

Mali Obomsawin is the mighty bassist/songwriter/singer from Lula Wiles, whose musical talents run tandem to her activist spirit. She really had no choice in the matter, seeing that her parents met through their advocacy for Abenaki and First Nations sovereignty battles. Mali's dad is a member of the Odanak Abenaki Nation and her mom at the time they met, was following and supporting tribal land claim initiatives. Along with Lula Wiles, her solo career (which is a bit of a new venture for Mali) and her sideplayer gigs, Mali works with several racial and environmental justice organizations based in Wabanaki homelands, and is the founder and executive director of Bomazeen Land Trust. She is a crucial voice when it comes to speaking out for First Nation representation and justice in the roots music world and beyond. She is generous with her knowledge, but also as her Twitter profile reads: "pay me for educating you." Which you can do! She has her PayPal linked right there.Mali grew up in rural Maine among five siblings and was constantly surrounded by music in her family. Her dad is a musician and Mali was always the performer as a little kid, constantly trying to make people happy and laugh while being a goofball. She was also made aware of the cruel stereotypes and racism in the world at an early age through mainstream culture. As she became older, she gravitated towards the upright bass and talks in the pod about her jazz sensibilities and what drew her to the instrument. She talks about how she came to songwriting last, but has managed to successfully combine a very rad sweepy dream-like style while "punctur[ing] the dream-haze of our apocalyptic capitalist world." On the new Lula Wiles album, Shame and Sedition, Mali's songs really shine through with highlights being "Everybody, (Connected)" "Do You Really Want The World to End" and "In Dreams." I look forward to more conversations with Mali, hopefully about a solo record... No pressure, Mali :) Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

59mins

15 Jul 2021

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Episode 35: Shame and Sedition (Isa Burke and Mali Obomsawin of Lula Wiles)

Ongoing History of Protest Music

This episode features special guest Isa Burke and Mali Obomosawin, two-thirds of the Americana folk trio Lula Wiles. We discuss their latest release Shame and Sedition. We discuss the motivation behind the album title and some of the political themes developed on the album. We chat about why colonialism is such an important topic to discuss as well.    

34mins

31 May 2021

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Isa Burke With Lula Wiles Shares Her Fully Immersed Recording Experience At Great North Sound Society

Makers of the USA

“I've been playing music my whole life, as have my bandmates. All of us come from musical families. Both of my parents are professional musicians and music teachers. My parents' names are Susie Burke and David Seret and they play a lot of different kinds of folk and traditional music. I grew up kind of immersed in the folk and roots music community in the sea coast area. It was kind of a no brainer for me. For a long time I wasn't totally sure if I wanted to be a professional musician, but I always knew that music was going to be a really big part of my life.”Isa dabbled in a few instruments at a young age, but definitely started singing before anything else. “I was the kind of kid who would just like to mess around with whatever was nearby. I was always drumming on surfaces or my parents would have guitars and ukuleles around the house. We had a piano I would sort of plunk away on that. Thought about learning the flute for a second in school, but that didn't pan out. I played trumpet for a couple years. Then, I played guitar when I was around 10. And then, when I was 13, I started playing fiddle. That was the first instrument that I really lost my mind over.”Her experience at Great North Sound Society, has been a fully immersed, changed woman typed of experience. Isa along with her bandmates recorded their first two albums at a studio in Boston, but their third album was recorded in June of 2020 at Great North Sound Society. When they make an album, they aren’t a band that wants to chip away at it over time. When they start, they want to be fully immersed in the experience. “(After recording), then I emerge as changed woman. That's so much what that space is like because it's a house. You are staying there, so you're just there round the clock. It's not like you get up and you go to the studio and then you go home. You’re totally immersed. I think that's a really special way to make a record. That is a big part of what makes Great North so awesome.”Lula Wiles new album, “Shame and Sedition” produced by Sam Kassirer is now out! Be sure to give them a listen.To learn more about Lula Wiles please visit their website and Instagram.Also, please check out the featured musician of this episode, Lula Wiles, and their new track In Dreams.

53mins

27 May 2021

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Lula Wiles

Out of the Box Album of the Week with Paul Shugrue

The Americana trio has transformed themselves for their third album inspired by the pandemic, “Shame and Sedition.”

25 May 2021

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Isa Burke of Lula Wiles, ep. 73

Basic Folk

Isa Burke, of Americana/folk trio Lula Wiles, is an opinionated white lady in America and I literally cannot get enough of her. The Maine native rebelled at a young age (under 10!) against her parents' folky disposition and devoured as much rock and roll as she could find. Eventually, her parents convinced her to attend Maine Fiddle Camp, where they attended as performers and teachers to campers of all ages (babies to grandparents). And what do you know? Isa love the hell out of fiddle camp and met some important friends while she was there: Eleanor Buckland and Mali Obomsawin, who, years later, came to form the trio Lula Wiles. Camp was also the first place that Isa saw young people taking on the folk tradition in a modern way. This excited her to no end thus began a life-long affair with traditional music.Isa talks about the lessons she learned at Maine Fiddle Camp and how they are reflected in her musicality and in her band. It also rooted in her a a love of playing music for the sake of feeling good (vs playing to sell a lot of records). We also get into her lead guitar playing: what made her start, how she approaches her role and what it means to be a female lead guitarist in this patriarchal society. My favorite part of this interview (and maybe any interview, really) are Isa's candid comments about body image issues. She introduced my to the idea of "body neutrality" and talks about working to cultivate that and the struggle that comes along with trying to figure out how to feel about your body. Like I said, I can't get enough of her. Love her, would recommend talking to her for an hour. American Songwriter Podcast Network: https://americansongwriter.com/american-songwriter-podcast-network/basic-folk-podcast/ Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

51mins

18 Jun 2020

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TNT - Episode 10 - featuring Lula Wiles

The Native Truth

This week on The Native Truth, a conversation with members of Lula Wiles. We talk about culture, colonization, the music industry, and what it's like for a trio of young women in the world of contemporary folk and popular music. This is a rebroadcast of...

58mins

26 May 2020

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WoodSongs 971: Baby Gramps and Lula Wiles

Woodsongs Vodcasts

BABY GRAMPS is an energetic humorously entertaining performer with an endless repertoire. He plays a National Steel guitar, and sings his own unique arrangements of rags, jazz, & blues from the 20's & 30's, and many originals with wordplay, humor, and throat singing. According to an article in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine, Baby Gramps is acknowledged as one of the top 50 most influential musicians in the last 100 years. This past year Baby Gramps was asked to be part of three films.LULA WILES is the trio made up of Isa Burke, Eleanor Buckland, and Mali Obomsawin and came of age in Boston, in the practice rooms of Berklee College of Music and the city’s lively roots scene. Anchoring the band’s sharp, provocative songcraft is a mastery of folk music, and a willingness to subvert its hallowed conventions. They infuse their songs with distinctly modern sounds: pop hooks, distorted electric guitars, and dissonant multi-layered vocals, all employed in the service of songs that reclaim folk music in their own voice. ‘What Will We Do’ is the trio’s sophomore album and out Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.WoodSongs Kids: The Grandview Pickers are an up-and-coming bluegrass band from Grandview, Tennessee

1hr 15mins

16 Apr 2020

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Lula Wiles

Folk Alley Sessions

(This Session was first posted on January 25, 2019.)In a world increasingly filled with uncertainty, tension, fear, and anger, how in the world are you supposed to get through each day, doing the best that you can do? That’s the conundrum the trio Lula Wiles ponders, analyzes, argues about, and tries to answer on their new album, What Will We Do. Mali Obomsawin, Ellie Buckland, and Isa Burke, friends for years in their native Maine before coming together, officially, in 2016 in Boston, are three musicians who believe that music has the power to bring out the humanity in all of us. They gathered together at the Upper Jay Arts Center’s Recovery Lounge in Upper Jay, New York to talk about their new album (and their first one, too, on the Smithsonian Folkways label), how they approach making music, and, of course, how they came up with their name.

22 Jan 2020

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Lula Wiles

Folk Alley Sessions

Lula Wiles (Mali Obomsawin, Ellie Buckland, and Isa Burke) were friends for years in their native Maine before coming together, officially, in 2016 in Boston. The trio believes that music has the power to bring out the humanity in all of us. They gathered together at the Upper Jay Arts Center’s Recovery Lounge in Upper Jay, New York to share some songs from their new album, What Will We Do - their first on the Smithsonian Folkways label.

22 Jan 2020

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WS971: Baby Gramps and Lula Wiles

The WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour Podcast

BABY GRAMPS is an energetic humorously entertaining performer with an endless repertoire. He plays a National Steel guitar, and sings his own unique arrangements of rags, jazz, & blues from the 20's & 30's, and many originals with wordplay, humor, and throat singing. According to an article in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine, Baby Gramps is acknowledged as one of the top 50 most influential musicians in the last 100 years. This past year Baby Gramps was asked to be part of three films.LULA WILES is the trio made up of Isa Burke, Eleanor Buckland, and Mali Obomsawin and came of age in Boston, in the practice rooms of Berklee College of Music and the city’s lively roots scene. Anchoring the band’s sharp, provocative songcraft is a mastery of folk music, and a willingness to subvert its hallowed conventions. They infuse their songs with distinctly modern sounds: pop hooks, distorted electric guitars, and dissonant multi-layered vocals, all employed in the service of songs that reclaim folk music in their own voice. ‘What Will We Do’ is the trio’s sophomore album and out Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.WoodSongs Kids: The Grandview Pickers are an up-and-coming bluegrass band from Grandview, Tennessee.

59mins

8 Jul 2019

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