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Tri Bourne Podcasts

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13 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Tri Bourne. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Tri Bourne, often where they are interviewed.

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13 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Tri Bourne. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Tri Bourne, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Tri Bourne: AVP Champion & Olympic hopeful on Meditation, Mindfulness, & Winning

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Sponsors mentioned:

Sandcast Podcast (co-host), Monster Hydro, Wilson Volleyball, Maui Jims, Kona Brew, Mizuno Volleyball

  • Listening as a tool for inspired living
  • How Tri overcame auto immune disease, and
  • How he chose to look at it as his biggest challenge yet also his biggest breakthrough
  • Winning an FIVB World Tour event in Berlin
  • Tri’s definition of Flow State
  • Tri on being versatile and adaptable
Aug 26 2020 · 1hr 10mins
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LTS Episode 30: Tri Bourne

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Beach volleyball pro Tri Bourne joins the show, fresh off his cathartic victory with teammate and fellow Hawaii boy Trevor Crabb at the AVP Porsche Cup. He talks about their Olympic hopes and how he overcame an autoimmune disease that threatened his career. Plus, Kanoa and Jordan react to the HHSAA's decision to postpone several fall sports, including prep football and girls volleyball, to 2021. They set the over-under on how many of the Mountain West-approved 10-game schedule the Hawaii football team will actually play. And, as always, the fellas wrap up the show with their "Best and Worst".
Aug 06 2020 · 59mins
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Episode 30: Tri Bourne

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Beach volleyball pro Tri Bourne joins the show, fresh off his cathartic victory with teammate and fellow Hawaii boy Trevor Crabb at the AVP Porsche Cup. He talks about their Olympic hopes and how he overcame an autoimmune disease that threatened his career. Plus, Kanoa and Jordan react to the HHSAA's decision to postpone several fall sports, including prep football and girls volleyball, to 2021. They set the over-under on how many of the Mountain West-approved 10-game schedule the Hawaii football team will actually play. And, as always, the fellas wrap up the show with their "Best and Worst". 

Aug 06 2020 · 59mins
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Tri Bourne has leveled up, winning his first AVP title in five years

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On this episode of SANDCAST: Beach volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter, we bring on host Tri Bourne, who just won his first AVP tournament in five years! 

Since launching this podcast, Bourne has battled -- is still battling -- an autoimmune disease, enrolled in acting classes, hosting classes, improv classes, begun reading books regularly, authored a book of his own, and is back in the winners circle on the AVP Tour. 

He speaks a lot on leveling up on this show. He certainly has himself. 

On this episode, we discuss:

- The AVP Champions Cup Series, from week one to week three, culminating in his win

- Trevor Crabb hilariously guaranteeing a win at the Porsche Cup, for no explicable reason

- Reminiscing to when Bourne was diagnosed with the autoimmune disease, when he had to have the conversation if he was ever going to play again

- Bouncing back from a brutal first set loss to Chaim Schalk and Chase Budinger

- What the next few weeks will look like for Bourne and Crabb

Thanks, as always, for listening to the show. Be sure to give a shout to our sponsor, Wilson Volleyball, for making the show happen! Use our discount code, Sandcast-20 to get 20 PERCENT OFF!

Also, we published a book! It's called Volleyball for Milkshakes, and we'd love it if you bought a copy, or dropped a review. Every little bit helps your favorite podcast :) 

Aug 05 2020 · 1hr 4mins
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Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter publish new book, Volleyball for Milkshakes!

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This episode of SANDCAST: Beach volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter, features a fun announcement from the hosts: They have co-written and published a book!

Their book, Volleyball for Milkshakes, is out today! The easiest place you can find it is on Amazon, and the audio version will be out in a week or so!

This episode covers, first and foremost, the book: how it came about, what it’s about, and how the podcast influenced the narrative. At the bottom of the show notes, we’ll provide the synopsis.

We also answer a number of fan questions, so thank you to all who submitted them!

  • We take a look at all the new teams signing up for the AVP Champions Cup, and why there are so many breakups happening despite no tournaments having been played just yet (hint: POINTS!)
  • Who our underdog picks are to stand out during the Champions Cup
  • If the AVP were to host a co-ed tournament, who would we pick as a partner?
  • Tri’s perspective on the AVP’s Covid-19 precautions
  • Who is our fantasy four-man team
  • Who has been practicing regularly and who might be a bit rusty
  • Which non-coastal city would we like to see the AVP host a tournament?

Thanks as always for listening, and supporting the show. As always, this show is brought to you by our guys at Wilson Volleyball, the No. 1 source of equipment for all things beach volleyball. Use our discount code, Sandcast-20 for 20 percent off! 

SYNOPSIS OF VOLLEYBALL FOR MILKSHAKES

Tri had anxiously been waiting for this day throughout the entire school year: The beginning of summer, when his days would be filled with beach volleyball, surfing, and more beach volleyball. But when he signs up for summer beach volleyball at Outrigger Beach with his best friend and partner, Trevor, he discovers the devastating news that Trevor had teamed up with his arch rival, Ricardo.

Now Tri, with the help of his tough love Auntie, must befriend a misfit named Travis, building a new team, a new partnership, and a deep friendship that changes his view on beach volleyball, and life.

In this first-of-its kind novel, SANDCAST podcast hosts and professional beach volleyball players Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter take you through a fictional tale that will inspire, humor, and teach lessons that will last a lifetime.

Jul 01 2020 · 1hr 2mins
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How Your Setback Can Become Your Comeback with Tri Bourne

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In this episode of Fit Food Junkies Podcast, I interview Tri Bourne, a professional beach volleyball player.⁣

We discuss:⁣

-How food can heal you⁣

-How to get back into the game⁣

-How your mind can control anything that you do in life⁣

-How to allow your setback to become your comeback⁣

-The power of developing a growth mindset⁣

-How adversity can transform your life⁣

-The story behind Tri's chronic inflammatory muscle disease⁣

-How to control and dictate your life to conquer your goals⁣

-The life of a professional athlete ⁣

Connect with Tri:⁣

Instagram: @tribourne 

Jun 24 2020 · 39mins
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The Wilson roundtable show with Stafford Slick, the McKibbin Brothers, and Tri Bourne

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The idea for this episode of SANDCAST: Beach volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter came, as most do, on a whim.

Tri had been talking to Wilson, our main sponsor of the show and who also sponsors some of the most talented athletes on the AVP. Wilson wanted to know if we could do a roundtable of sorts: All seven Wilson athletes – Tri Bourne, Stafford Slick, Riley McKibbin, Madison McKibbin, Casey Patterson, Kelly Reeves, Sarah Sponcil, Irene Pollock – on a single podcast. Adding in my voice as a host of the show, making it eight in total, seemed crowded. A good idea, but a noisy one.

We decided to cut the number down to four – five, including me, the moderator – and have a debate-style show, not unlike ESPN’s Around the Horn. You’ll have to let us know what you think.

We cover 15 topics, including, but obviously not limited to:

  • Why Stafford Slick, king of the NORCECA tour, thinks Wilson makes the best volleyball
  • Does Ron Von Hagen belong on beach volleyball’s Mount Rushmore?
  • Is the Last Dance the best sports documentary ever?
  • Is Tim Bomgren the best player yet to win an AVP?
  • Why Riley McKibbin thinks there should be a substitution rule in beach volleyball

Let us know what you think. As we mentioned, it’s an experiment, and we have no idea if it was a mess, fun to listen to, or somewhere in between.

SHOOTS!

Jun 03 2020 · 1hr 2mins
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Tri Bourne and Trevor Crabb are looking to improve upon first year’s foundation

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Tri Bourne found a funny way to describe a learning moment he and Trevor Crabb had towards the end of the 2019 season, their first as partners and first as split-blockers.

“Only at the end of the year did we figure out: ‘Oh, our timing is off. We’re not doing defense right,’” he said on SANDCAST: Beach Volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter.

Not doing defense right? And still finishing 2019 as the second-ranked American team in the Olympic race? Still being ranked tenth in the world, finishing the season with a bronze medal at the Chetumal four-star?

“It seems simple, but when you’re in the middle of the game, it’s really hard to implement a high level, sophisticated defense with all the right movements and everything,” Bourne said. “So in the middle of the year we were learning and trying to apply it but only some of it stuck. Basically, we think of last year as our foundation and now it’s time to grow on that.”

Bourne and Crabb may be in the most interesting position as any team in the United States, male or female. They enter the season as one of the coveted two American teams who, if the Olympics were to take place tomorrow, would be competing in Tokyo. But the race is close enough that it doesn’t really matter, because the Olympics are not going to take place tomorrow, and at the end of the day, it will likely come down to the Rome Major in June.

What Crabb and Bourne do have is this: An upside – and downside – that is entirely unknown. As Bourne mentioned, neither of them really knew what they were doing on defense last year, and they still finished fourth at the World Championships, taking both Russia’s Viacheslav Krasilnikov and Oleg Stoyanovskiy and Norway’s Anders Mol and Christian Sorum to three sets.

Who knows what the potential upside could be? Then again, who knows how quickly they can begin to, in Bourne’s parlance, do defense right?

Such a quandary is not a quandary at all for either Jake Gibb and Taylor Crabb or Phil Dalhausser and Nick Lucena. Gibb, Dalhausser and Lucena have seven Olympics between them, and Taylor Crabb is on the short list of best defenders in the world. In other words: Defensively speaking, you know exactly what you’re going to get on their side of the net.

With Bourne and Trevor Crabb?

“There’s a lot of stuff to clean up,” Bourne said. “Continue to buy into the stuff that [coach] Jose [Loiola] is bringing to the table. We were spending so much time learning how to play this new style of volleyball that I don’t feel like I ever blocked the way I used to, not even close. So I’d like to get back to that for sure.”

What Bourne is grateful for, at the moment, is the fact that he’s back in this situation at all: Six months of Olympic qualifying to go, sitting in the second American spot. It was only two years ago, sidelined with an autoimmune disease, that Bourne wasn’t sure if he’d be able to play beach volleyball again, let alone at a level that could qualify him for the Olympics.

Now here he is, autoimmune disease under control, tenth-ranked team in the world – and he didn’t even “do defense right” the whole time.

“If we play well and get better at volleyball, if we’re a better team, and we play better, and I become a better volleyball player, I’m good with the result,” Bourne said. “I’m gonna be pissed if we don’t make the Olympics. Don’t get me wrong. That is the goal, but what are you going to do? You got better. You improved. And these other teams did better? Ok, I’ll live with it.

“Right after the last Olympic quad I was like ‘This is my time.’ It’s cool to be in this position and I’m super grateful and it’s going to be fun no matter what happens.”

Jan 22 2020 · 54mins
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Tri Bourne is back on the road again

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It seems an idyllic existence, to be a professional beach volleyball player. Travel the world. Explore the planet’s most breathtaking beaches. See everything there is to see, both inland and coastal. Play in front of thousands of adoring fans. Sign autographs. Take pictures.

Live the life Instagram would love you to have.

That’s all true, yes. Tri Bourne gets to travel the world. He gets to explore the planet’s most breathtaking beaches, eat all the world’s best and unique foods. He gets to see everything there is to see.

Including 2 a.m. in Jinjiang, China. A world away from his family, his pregnant wife, running on two hours of sleep per night for the previous few nights, having just spent the previous 45 hours on planes and buses and shuttles, crammed into spaces not made for abnormally large men who need to use their bodies to make a living. That, and Bourne’s body has been notoriously rebellious these past two years, with an autoimmune disease that has made traveling the world to play a sport with exceptionally high demands on the body that much more stressful.

Most don’t recognize that side of the sport.

Bourne, back full-time on the world tour for the first time since 2016, is again feeling its effects.

“I was up at 2 multiple times,” he said of his time at the Jinjiang four-star, where he and Trevor Crabb finished fourth. “Dude, just freaking lay there. It’s brutal. We kept losing time. We kept going the same direction without going back, so we were going around the world and you had to adjust. So when we got used to it being 7 a.m., we had to adjust.”

Adjusting is the name of the game for professional beach volleyball players. As Kerri Walsh Jennings said from Ostrava, the tournament following Jinjiang – where her and Brooke Sweat claimed their first gold medal as a team – “jet lag doesn’t discriminate.”

Then she was off to the sauna to sweat out some of that jet lag. Which brings up the next aspect of life on the world tour: Staying fit and healthy, maintaining those lean bodies seen on livestreams and TV, is not the easiest of tasks. Hardly.

“It’s difficult,” Bourne said. “A lot of times, we’re using our matches to get us into shape. These tournaments where we’re going seven matches in, you have two days of travel and then you need to recover from that travel, then you have a day or two before you play, so you don’t really have any time.

“Our lifts were super jet lagged. We were just trying to open the body up because everything is super locked up from the plane. And when you haven’t gotten great sleep, you’re sore, you don’t want to push it, because that’s how you hurt yourself. There’s really not much lifting or practicing.”

So they play. They play in Brazil and China and Czech and, hey, last week they even had the chance to play in the United States, for AVP New York! It wasn’t home, necessarily, but it was as close as it gets for life on the world tour. Everyone speaks English. The food is familiar. There’s family. Gyms.

And now, after a quick stay, Bourne and the rest of the U.S. Olympic hopefuls are back on the road, to Warsaw, Poland. Some had to play a country quota, hardly a day to prepare for the cut-throat nature of the single-elimination format. Others will be in the qualifier.

Everyone will be fighting the same, tired, thrilling, exhausted, rewarding, wonderful battle.

“You watch some video, you’re playing,” Bourne said, “then you’re back to preparation.”

Jun 12 2019 · 41mins
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HawaiiCast with Tri Bourne and Taylor and Trevor Crabb

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The relationship between brothers is often too complicated for even brothers to fully understand, let alone communicate to the world beyond, especially when their immediate world beyond knows their life history – where they grew up and went to high school, where they went to college and what they’ve done since.

When you throw into that the fact that the two brothers in mind – Taylor and Trevor Crabb – were, for a period of two years, also simultaneously maintaining the most volatile of relationships – business partners, roommates, volleyball partners, running among the same group of friends – it would have been quite curious if they didn’t fight a bit than to the extent they did.

So yes, when Taylor and Trevor Crabb played beach volleyball together, as they did at the professional level in 2015 and 2016 and in various tournaments in 2011 and 2013, there were times they didn’t get along.

And there were times – almost all the time, really – on the court, that it just didn’t matter.

“It’s every partnership,” Taylor said on SANDCAST: Beach Volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter. “The longer you’re with someone, the more stuff is going to get on your nerves. Being brothers just amplifies it that much more. For the most part we were able to put it behind us and perform, and we played great for the year and a half that we were together. But just like every partnership it gets harder and harder as it goes on.”

Watch any sibling partnership and you will see much of the same. Nicole and Megan McNamara at UCLA “will say things to each other they would never say to a different partner,” former Bruin assistant coach Jeff Alzina said. But they’re able to snipe at each other, to demand more, because they’re sisters. The McKibbins, Riley and Maddison, are no different. This is just what siblings do.

They demand more. Expect more.

And besides, it’s not as if a true blood relationship is needed to dig at one another. Growing up, the Hawaiian crew – the Crabbs, Bourne, McKibbins, Brad Lawson, Spencer McLaughlin – simply labeled Taylor “little shit.” Nobody is quicker to talk a little trash to Trevor than Bourne, his own partner, and vice versa.

“They still try to give me crap,” Taylor said, “but it’s getting harder to.”

The point in their careers is a rare one for siblings of any sort in the sense that, 18 months from now, it is not all that unlikely to see both Crabbs in the Olympic Games, Tokyo 2020. Taylor and Jake Gibb are the No. 2 team in the U.S., Bourne and Trevor No. 3.

“You really gotta stay present in it,” Bourne said. “It’s such a long process. As much as our sport weighs on Olympics, you want that label, that’s everyone’s dream, it’s literally one tournament of your whole career. If you get caught up in two years of that certain event putting pressure on every other event, you’re really wasting your time. You just had a great finish on the world tour? Enjoy that. Be there.”

And so the process begins. Taylor and Gibb are in Sydney this week for a three-star, their first event of the Olympic push and of the 2019 season. Trevor and Bourne skipped Sydney, focusing instead on a four-star in Doha the following week. By 2020, three kids from the Outrigger Canoe Club could be donning the red, white, and blue.

“It’s pretty nuts,” Bourne said. “We were – well, we still are – cocky little shits.”

You see, whether the birth certificates say so or not, this Hawaiian bunch is a family. And, like most competitive siblings, the trash talk never stops, no matter what side of the net you’re on.

Mar 06 2019 · 56mins
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